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Thread: Did Chevrolet ever make a slant six engine?

  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by gvasale
    too bad you who live on the other side of the world never got to drive any of the Mopars with the B, RB engines or 426 Hemi.
    The first car I owned was a 1951 Riley sedan with a twin cam hemi engine, it was a great gravel road car.

  2. #52
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    Artful: Stylish in their typical British manner. I'd like to see a photo of the cylinder head showing the combustion chamber. The earlier photo showing the cylinder head in this thread is not a "true" hemi. A "true" hemi engine has a straight path for airflow from intake to exaust in addition to the hemispherical combustion chamber.

    Also like we say over here, there"s no substitute for cubic inches.

    The 2.5L is still less than 150 CI. Chrysler B engines started out with 350 CI. Most popular were the 383 CI and later the 400 CI.

    RB engined started out with 383CI (known as the 383 High Block because of the 3.75" stroke) the 413 CI, the 426 CI (also known as the 426 Wedge) and finally the 440 CI.

    The 426 Hemi was a redesigned 426 Wedge engine fitted with hemi heads, a different bolt pattern for the heads and a cross tied main bearing cap setup.
    gvasale

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by gvasale
    too bad you who live on the other side of the world never got to drive any of the Mopars with the B, RB engines or 426 Hemi.
    I wouldnt say theyre lacking for opportunity, "original" hemi cars are probably like big block mid year Corvettes and early Camaro SSs - there are more of them today than produced originally.

    I had the "fun" of driving a truly original (1 owner) hemi Road Runner a few years back bc I am good friends with both the car owner and shop owner who restored it. In the shop owner's words, "Treat it like a Farmall tractor. Forget about the gas pedal. Put it in gear and let out the clutch. Once its rolling steady, then CAREFULLY feather the gas." Huge torquey engine + skinny tires + trying not to harm someone else's expensive restoration = not my kind of fun. Now had it been an "original" poser/clone car, that would be fun to beat on.
    "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

  4. #54
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    Justanengineer: Right on the money with an original car. I owned a 67 Dodge Charger originally equipped with a 383 2bbl and 4 speed. Over the 19 years I owned it I put on a ton of miles swapping engines as needed. I drove it for the last five years I owned it with a 440. At one time this engine had the hemi grind camshaft and 4.10 rear axle gearset. It had the 8 3/4 rear so I knew I couldn't hammer it like if it had the Dana 60 and the coarse spline tranny. But that never stopped me from stomping in it and listening to the roar of an AFB carb which sounded much better than a Holley. When gas was no longer cheap a mild cam and 3.23 gears were called for. Didn't need to downshift once you were in the 30 mph range. At that speed unless you wanted to get crazy, even with the mild setup just step on the gas and go.
    gvasale

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by gvasale
    Artful: Stylish in their typical British manner. I'd like to see a photo of the cylinder head showing the combustion chamber. The earlier photo showing the cylinder head in this thread is not a "true" hemi. A "true" hemi engine has a straight path for airflow from intake to exaust in addition to the hemispherical combustion chamber.

    Sorry, cant find a picture of the internals.




    The Riley engine has two cams, operating inclined valves in a hemispherical shaped combustion chamber, inlet on one side of the head and exhaust on the other with the spark plug vertical between them.

    Also like we say over here, there"s no substitute for cubic inches.
    Yeabut... a 1 1/2 ton car with a top speed of 90mph is not too shabby on 2.5 litres, I suppose if I had grafted another engine (or two) on to bring it up to 'acceptable cubes' it would have gone better, in a straight line.


    The 2.5L is still less than 150 CI. Chrysler B engines started out with 350 CI. Most popular were the 383 CI and later the 400 CI.

    RB engined started out with 383CI (known as the 383 High Block because of the 3.75" stroke) the 413 CI, the 426 CI (also known as the 426 Wedge) and finally the 440 CI.

    The 426 Hemi was a redesigned 426 Wedge engine fitted with hemi heads, a different bolt pattern for the heads and a cross tied main bearing cap setup.
    You are making the assumption that a huge heavy engine must be better, the biggest engine I have ever rode behind was nearly 10 litres and althought it was very good at pulling stumps out it was not so flash on the road...



    BTW, when I had the Riley I could drive a particular route in 1 hour 35 which included a climb to over 2000' in the first 12 miles followed by a deep gravel, narrow twisting, alpine road. I sold the Riley and brought a fine product of General Motors with a 308 V8, the same route took me 1 hour 45 no matter how hard I tried.
    Last edited by The Artful Bodger; 06-02-2012 at 07:26 PM.

  6. #56
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    Bodger do you know the bore and stroke of that tractor?

    Is that possibly a "Lanz" ?

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch
    Bodger do you know the bore and stroke of that tractor?

    Is that possibly a "Lanz" ?
    Yes, it is a Lanz. Similar tractors were made in various countries including the UK (Field Marshall), Australia (Imperial and Lanz), South America (Lanz?), France, Soviet Union.

    They are single cylinder 2 stroke 'semi-diesels' on the Hornsby-Ackroyd principle, IIRC.

    There were various models and the big one had a 225mm bore 260mm stroke. (10.266litre)

    Honest tractors and no good for anything except pulling stuff!

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