Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 24

Thread: Repairing milling attachment for Craftsman/atlas lathe

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    111

    Default Repairing milling attachment for Craftsman/atlas lathe

    Last night I made a craigslist purchase of an old craftsman 12" lathe just so I could get some of the accessories. One of them was the factory milling attachment. After I got home and was making a close inspection of my haul, I noticed a slight bulge below each of the retaining pins indicating that sometime in the past the mill was forced against the pins and cracked the cast iron around the holes out....

    Just curious how I should go about fixing this? Any ideas? My first thought is to just knock out the broken parts, weld, machine, and re-drill the holes, but my cast iron experience is limited to knowing that it can be tricky stuff....

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Angaston, South Australia
    Posts
    60

    Default

    If you can post a pic of it we may be able to get a better idea of the problem.

    Mtw fdu.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    South Florida and NC
    Posts
    1,245

    Default

    Having no picture to help me fully understand the problem, I'll offer the following experience.

    I obtained an Atlas MF Mill with vise. Upon cleaning up the vise i discovered that at some point the fixed jaw had bee broken off and repaired with brazing. So far this repair has worked well and not shown any signs of breaking again. With common sense use it will probably be fine for as long as I want the Mill.

    So, that all said, perhaps brazing would be an acceptable repair for your issue.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    111

    Default

    Thanks for the responses. I'd considered brazing but since this is probably the point where all the leverage against the whole mill concentrates I was concerned it might not be strong enough.

    I need to clean the attachment up so the damage will show up in a photo. I'll probably start on that tonight and see about posting pics tomorrow.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    215

    Default

    The pin and taper system isnít up to the task. Even with parts that are in perfect order you will see movement - oil pumping from this joint. Drill and tap a .375 ish thread in the cross slide stud and drill a corresponding clearance hole through the center of your attachment between the gussets. Relieve the high spots and bolt the attachment on with a SHCS or a bolt with spacer. A piece of thin paper, phone book page, between the parts will ensure that nothing slips without the need to gorilla tighten them. This modification yields such good results that it is worth doing to undamaged parts, so you might consider doing both of them while you are at it. Having a threaded hole in the stud makes it much easier to rigidly mount other fixtures.
    One more point, this modification is also the cure if your lathe or the attachment has been used a lot as the attachment will want to return to the worn spots, from previous use, on the stud taper and this can make it very difficult to properly tram for your setup.
    Donít apply heat!
    Good luck, Mike

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Posts
    3,667

    Default

    Mike,sounds like a great mod. Any chance of getting a picture of this mod. I think a lot of us will be doing this. Thanks! Eric

    Quote Originally Posted by mf205i
    The pin and taper system isnít up to the task. Even with parts that are in perfect order you will see movement - oil pumping from this joint. Drill and tap a .375 ish thread in the cross slide stud and drill a corresponding clearance hole through the center of your attachment between the gussets. Relieve the high spots and bolt the attachment on with a SHCS or a bolt with spacer. A piece of thin paper, phone book page, between the parts will ensure that nothing slips without the need to gorilla tighten them. This modification yields such good results that it is worth doing to undamaged parts, so you might consider doing both of them while you are at it. Having a threaded hole in the stud makes it much easier to rigidly mount other fixtures.
    One more point, this modification is also the cure if your lathe or the attachment has been used a lot as the attachment will want to return to the worn spots, from previous use, on the stud taper and this can make it very difficult to properly tram for your setup.
    Donít apply heat!
    Good luck, Mike
    "The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, peace at any price, safety first instead of duty first, the love of soft living and the get rich theory of life." Theodore Roosevelt

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Deep in the Heart of Texas!
    Posts
    5,650

    Default

    I'm not sure what "pin" you're talking about. The picture below shows the Atlas Milling Attachment. The only pins I know of are the beveled pins that fit against the swivel when you pull the compound off to mount the attachment.


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    northwest wisconsin
    Posts
    1,160

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mf205i
    The pin and taper system isnít up to the task. Even with parts that are in perfect order you will see movement - oil pumping from this joint. Drill and tap a .375 ish thread in the cross slide stud and drill a corresponding clearance hole through the center of your attachment between the gussets. Relieve the high spots and bolt the attachment on with a SHCS or a bolt with spacer. A piece of thin paper, phone book page, between the parts will ensure that nothing slips without the need to gorilla tighten them. This modification yields such good results that it is worth doing to undamaged parts, so you might consider doing both of them while you are at it. Having a threaded hole in the stud makes it much easier to rigidly mount other fixtures.
    One more point, this modification is also the cure if your lathe or the attachment has been used a lot as the attachment will want to return to the worn spots, from previous use, on the stud taper and this can make it very difficult to properly tram for your setup.
    Donít apply heat!
    Good luck, Mike
    .
    .
    i too would like to see a pix. . .

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    2,092

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hal9000
    I'd considered brazing but I was concerned it might not be strong enough.

    Don't underestimate the strength of a properly done braze joint, it most likely will be nearly as strong, or even AS strong, as the original cast iron. If you do decide to weld this thing brazing would probably be a much better way to do it than arc welding with Nickle rod.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    DFW Texas
    Posts
    912

    Default

    The stud he is referring to is the dovetailed boss sticking up from the cross-slide, to which the milling attachment or compound clamps. You drill and tap this for that bolt which goes vertically through a new hole in the milling attachment down into the threaded hole.
    Great idea BTW.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •