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Thread: Responsibly disposing of fluids and waste

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    20

    Default Responsibly disposing of fluids and waste

    Im pretty sure i already know the answer to this, i just wanted to hear from you all about your opinions.

    How do you guys dispose of hazardous waste in a home shop? Oil is easy enough, just run it down to Advance Auto and pour it in their collection tank. But other fluids are not as easy. im thinking like kerosene for cleaning high precision bearings, highly caustic parts washer fluids, coolant fluids, paint thinner, acetone, etc. how do you all dispose of them?

    my current thought is to get a 35 gallon drum and find some kind of disposal company but i wanted your thoughts.

    thanks
    Why buy one for $300 when i can BUILD one for $25 in materials, (and $1000 in tools)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Stevens Point, WI
    Posts
    4,771

    Default

    I have heard from many different people that some cities are set up to take coolant fluids (antifreeze) in the sewage treatment.
    Andy

  3. #3
    Dr Stan Guest

    Default

    Many communities have hazardous material collection sites, or annual/semi-annual collection events for all sorts of chemicals ranging from oil based paint to insecticides. I recommend contacting your local government and/or your waste disposal service to find out the details.

    If they do not have these services, maybe its time someone (hint) takes the time to advocate for such a service.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    157

    Default

    At this point, I try to find the local hazard waste collection site in my community. It's taken awhile but I've now got one that happens once every month or so. I will say it was a long road though. 10 years ago there was only one offered and it was roughly every 6 months. I don't like storing bad stuff around the house even when I don't have kids.

    I do quite a bit of painting. The things I generally take to these collection sites are hardners (isocyanates) and left over urethane resins. I do know people who take what's left of the paint, pour in hardner, and then pour it out onto a towel lined plastic bucket, let it harden and then throw it the trash.

    I do a fair amount of home plating, mostly zinc but some electroless nickel. Most of the modern chemical providers are nice enough to provide instructions on how to render the bad ones harmless which enables you to pour SOME of them down the drain. Acids the same although trying to neutralize a gallon of hydrochloric is just insane. I take that stuff to the above mentioned collection days.

    I toured a modern sewage treatment plant recently and although I was amazed at how much they can pull out I'm not sure they can deal with the really bad stuff. Right now I know the biggest problem they have is steroids and hormones.

    $.02

    Ken

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Woodinville, WA
    Posts
    5,162

    Default

    Here we have a specific transfer station set up to take hazadous waste. Also, there is a "waste-mobile" that roams around the different local cities every 6 months for homeowner wastes (but they take up to 10 gallon of "anything").

    We an also can get it picked up and hauled away, but at $3 a gallon by the 55 gallon drum full, it can get pricey. A local machine shop concentrates (boils) much of the the water out of his water based coolent - the waste hauler doesn't care if he hauls concentrate or water -same price.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    in dixie
    Posts
    1,198

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by scphantm
    Oil is easy enough, just run it down to Advance Auto and pour it in their collection tank. But other fluids are not as easy. im thinking like kerosene for cleaning high precision bearings, highly caustic parts washer fluids, coolant fluids, paint thinner, acetone, etc. how do you all dispose of them?
    thanks
    Motor oil to a local recyclers, combustible mixes of "other" oils, trans fluid, thinners, solvents, hydraulic, etc. to a guy with a waste oil burner. Parts cleaning fluid: the bulk of the liquid goes to the local Hazmat place in 5 gal. quantities; remainder is evaporated, the sludge scraped out, dried and into the municipal trash.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Merkel, Tx
    Posts
    723

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rosco-P
    remainder is evaporated, the sludge scraped out, dried and into the municipal trash.
    I kind of agree with Rosco, evaporate the kero, naptha, varsol and dispose of the sludge in municipal waste.

    Motor oil goes to the recyclers.

    Tim

  8. #8

    Default

    Please be safe in mixing a lot of different chemicals together in a single disposable container. Chemical reactions can really cause havoc, and will happen at the least expected moment, like 15 minutes after you close the shop for the night.
    George
    My Web Site
    www.mrrace.com
    Builder & Test Pilot N73EX

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    webster, ma
    Posts
    829

    Default

    I dump dirty kero & real paint thinner into the tank for the oil burner.

    Don't generate much other hazards, but something like rags with cutting oil or cat litter soaked with spills goes into the trash. No liquid as I don't want any trails from me.

    Acetone when I use it, it evaporates, and anything else, is handled in a similar matter
    gvasale

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,513

    Default

    Neutralizing the common acids is the ONLY wat to go. Garden lime in the form of crushed limestone, (not hydrated builder's lime,) placed in a 5 gal bucket. Pour your acid in a little at a time and let the foaming subside.
    Hydrochloric reacts to form calcium chloride, sulfuric to form calcium sulfate, and phosphoric to form calcium phosphate. The first two can go down the sewer; they are harmless. The last one is an essential fertilizer, (the third number on the fertilizer bag.)
    If you mix all your goodies in a drum, the nice man from the Hazardous Waste company will ask you what is in it. When you say: "I am not sure." He will reply: "Then we will analyse it, but it will cost you." Then he will tell you how much per gallon your "economy of mixing" will cost you, ON TOP OF THE ANALYSIS!
    Dont try and save money or space by blending, unless you are VERY sure what you are doing.
    Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

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