Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 29

Thread: Wire Rope Crimps.....

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Mount Clemens, Mi
    Posts
    2,558

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jkilroy View Post
    The ferrules or crimp tool should come with a gauge that will let you know when the ferrule has been crimped far enough. I would be wary of the hydraulic crimper made for electrical work, the hex shape leaves more room at the parting line of the crimp than does the proper tool. May work fine, but I would want to run some tests first. I have a couple of bolt cutter style units for up to 3/8 cable and a large manual unit for 1/2 that is bench mounted. I usually apply three crimps to each ferrule. The ferrules that I have would not have room for four.
    I only use the solid crimps, and then crimp 3 times turning the loop and crimp. "Testing" like I said I am only doing tie downs of the frame on the carport and other non life in the balance type stuff.The bungee cords or the tarp will go away first. As a matter of fact the only ones that have ever come apart are the ones I had done by a company when I was paint signs!
    Glen
    Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
    I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
    All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    337

    Default

    The aluminium ferrules are for your galvanised wire, the copper are for stainless wire.

    Copper may be stronger than the Aluminium, both are stronger than the wire when correctly done.

    This company do it correctly. http://www.talurit.com/webbplats/sho...ge_English.asp

    You will find a company like then in your country.

    If this is for a lifting application or is mission critical you might be better to get someone to do the crimps ( with quality assured ferrules) for you.
    Last edited by Davidhcnc; 08-25-2012 at 08:04 PM. Reason: It's late. Spelling has gone bad
    "...do you not think you have enough machines?"

  3. #13

    Default Crimping cables

    When I built my airplane I crimped a lot of ends of 1/8 inch cables. Here is how they looked when finished. This was one of my rudder cable turnbuckle connections.


    This is a plated copper Nico Press. I used a commercial tool, with about 30" long handles. Each Nico Press has three crimps. You start with the center, then do the one next to the cable eye, and the cable exit end last. The tool has 3 or 4 different crimp openings, (holes) and you must use the right one for the Nico Press you are using. You can see that when done properly, they really come out very nice. And, there is no way you can pull it apart, before breaking the cable, when properly installed.

    I borrowed the tool from my local Experimental Aircraft Chapter. Most have these tools for loan to home builders to use. The particular tool that I used was about 30 years old and cost over $100 back when it was purchased. Really very heavy duty. One of the guys at my Chapter told me the tool was rated an 3 tons for my size of crimp. One heck of a mechanical advantage with about a 36 inch hand operated tool.

    If you want to see all of this kind of stuff in one place, take a look at the Aircraft Spruce website. Look up cable crimping tools and supplies, you will find it all there.
    http://www.aircraftspruce.com

    A visit to your local airport, and finding any pilot will put you in touch with someone who has one of these tools. And I bet if you ask, it could be borrowed.
    George
    My Web Site
    www.mrrace.com
    Builder & Test Pilot N73EX

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    2,500

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tryfred View Post
    You might look up Nico press crimp and/or fittings for more information.
    I do believe that the 4 crimps were done with a tool that resembles a bolt cutter type tool with the proper dies in it for making individual crimps.

    Joe
    Thats what I thought too and was told the same by a few people even some in the business. I called the tower mfg. co. and spoke to one of the engineers and he told me that the crimps done at the factory are not done with a hand crimp tool, they are done in a die, one shot in a press.
    The crimps are Nico. I think they may have had a special 4 segment die made special. I like the idea of leaving about 3/4" of tail sticking out past the ferrule end, it's a good way to tell if it's slipping. I was also told by the same engineer that it's not necssary to have the tail, but I'm leary of having the cable cut right at the end of the ferrule. Was also told that two ferrules won't make any difference in holding power as the cable should break before the crimp slips. If the crimp were to start slipping I think that the tail would ad to the holding power as the frayed end of the cable would have to compress and pull into the fitting.
    I also measured the space between each segment of several cables and every one of the segments is spaced exactly to the thou.
    No one can place a hand crimper that accuratly, there would be some variation. I know there is a check gage, I'm sure they must use one and they do give all the finished cables the pull test before sending them out.

    JL..................

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Palmer Alaska
    Posts
    323

    Default

    I’ve never played with the little stuff but was a crane rigger in a former life. We always used a fid and back braded first, otherwise OSHA said we could only use 85% of the lines WLL or 60% with the bolt on clamps. Never saddle a dead horse and always torque to proper specks with the bolt on clamps.
    Anybody that thinks they know it all doesn’t even know enough to understand they know nothing!
    Andy

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Buffalo NY
    Posts
    2,173

    Default

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...7iftUnnL4&NR=1


    Watch this video closely.
    The proper way to do this is to separate the strands into 2 groups.
    Form a loop and back wind them on to each other.
    The lays will fit back together, making for a smooth cable again in the form of the loop.
    Then when the ends meet again, secure them with a furrell.
    Without the furrell, the cable is 85% as strong as with the furrell.
    What the video leaved off is the crimping of the furrell.
    Done in a press, usually a smaller 4 poster, at least 500 tons.
    Using a furrell without the interweaving is just second rate.

    You will NOT see a rigger or an ironworker use a choker with the ends not interwoven.

    --Doozer

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    On the Oil Coast,USA
    Posts
    16,871

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Doozer View Post
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...7iftUnnL4&NR=1


    Watch this video closely.
    The proper way to do this is to separate the strands into 2 groups.
    Form a loop and back wind them on to each other.
    The lays will fit back together, making for a smooth cable again in the form of the loop.
    Then when the ends meet again, secure them with a furrell.
    Without the furrell, the cable is 85% as strong as with the furrell.
    What the video leaved off is the crimping of the furrell.
    Done in a press, usually a smaller 4 poster, at least 500 tons.
    Using a furrell without the interweaving is just second rate.

    You will NOT see a rigger or an ironworker use a choker with the ends not interwoven.

    --Doozer
    +1 for that,called a Flemish eye,used to do them all the time logging.
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Palmer Alaska
    Posts
    323

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Doozer View Post
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...7iftUnnL4&NR=1


    Watch this video closely.
    The proper way to do this is to separate the strands into 2 groups.
    Form a loop and back wind them on to each other.
    The lays will fit back together, making for a smooth cable again in the form of the loop.
    Then when the ends meet again, secure them with a furrell.
    Without the furrell, the cable is 85% as strong as with the furrell.
    What the video leaved off is the crimping of the furrell.
    Done in a press, usually a smaller 4 poster, at least 500 tons.
    Using a furrell without the interweaving is just second rate.

    You will NOT see a rigger or an ironworker use a choker with the ends not interwoven.

    --Doozer
    That guy is good at it.
    Anybody that thinks they know it all doesn’t even know enough to understand they know nothing!
    Andy

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    2,500

    Default

    Thats interesting but they don't do that with smaller cables and thinbles.

    JL.................

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Buffalo NY
    Posts
    2,173

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeLee View Post
    Thats interesting but they don't do that with smaller cables and thinbles.

    JL.................

    I used some 1/4 cable to replace the tailgate chains on my old pickup
    truck box. I wove the strands around the eyelet just like the video. Actually I did not have any
    crimp furrells, so I wrapped the terminations with tape. That was 13 years ago.
    The tailgate cables still hold.

    --Doozer

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •