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Thread: Another Hardinge mill

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    NW Illinois
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    15

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    PaulT & DrStan,
    I understand your feelings. My shop includes a Quincy 325 compressor, a Logan 14x40 veri-speed lathe, a 16" Prema shaper, a small TAIG CNC mill, and now this Hardinge/Bridgeport mongrel. Oh, and a Buffalo (Taiwanese, sorry) drill press.
    Ken

  2. #22
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    Aug 2012
    Location
    NW Illinois
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    15

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    Lane,
    I find the Hammerite hammer tone grey to be some unique stuff. It took a while to develop a technique that I was happy with. First off, spraying is not an option for me. Brushing the hammer tone finish would leave brush marks as it tacked up quickly. I ended up resorting to “stippling”. I cut the first third of the bristles off a cheap brush (chip brush) to shorten it then dipped it in the paint and just kept poking it at the surface. If a run developed, I just poked at it. The stuff levels remarkably well. See the “M” head picture. I tried “stippling” Hammerite that was a regular gloss black finish (not a hammer tone) and was not pleased as the surface looked lumpy. The hammer tone is probably lumpy to but the effect enhances that type of finish. Whether one likes the hammer tone effect or not is a matter of taste. For my equipment, I feel it renders a somewhat sophisticated look that is easily applied without a paint booth or special equipment.
    Ken


  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    NW Illinois
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    1200rpm,
    Putting an “M” head on a Harding TM/UM is probably more involved after it’s done than before. I say this because the height from the table to the spindle is 11 ½ inches…max. and one must keep the tooling stack up short. My solution was to acquire a 0 to 3/8 inch drill chuck with a 3/8 shank and a complete set of screw machine drills. All over 3/8 had their shanks turned down to 3/8 inch. Now I do not have to change collets when drilling holes ½ inch and less. I have a set of Demming drills with ½ inch shanks for up to 1 inch. Single ended end mills is the rule. Another help is to not have a swivel base on the vise unless really needed. The 4 inch Kurt vise is really too big, but the capacity is handy. Putting some kind of “feet” on the Hardinge to raise it some helps the back (I am 5’ 9”).

    My “M” head had a ¼ or 3/8 inch deep 2.001 inch dia. depression in the back that served as a pilot hole for the knuckle. I eliminated the knuckle. The Hardinge over arm was 2.000 dia. I heat shrunk (.005 shrink, 700 degrees F.) an adapter to the back of the over arm leaving enough shaft sticking out to engage the pilot hole. I took a cleanup facing cut (with the over arm between centers) on the adapter to assure squareness. The adapter was made from 6 inch dia. (5 ½ inch would do fine) by 1 ¼ inch long mild steel. Don’t know the alloy. Same welder I got the Hardinge from had it lying on the floor. When he heard my plan, he gave it to me.
    Ken

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    NW Illinois
    Posts
    15

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    Bill,
    You are quite observant. I have it in the back of my mind that the mill is neither a TM or UM, but a "Cataract 5" production mill. Sorry to say, I can not recall where I got that notion. The name may be from the 5C (5 Cataract) collet series that this machine can use in the horizontal spindle.

    Interestingly, the knee and Y axis have threaded stops for repeat production that are not found on the TM/UM. Also there is no provision for an X axis table lock.

    The spindle nose is not threaded.

    The knee slide is not level with the table but ends above it about 1/2 inch which restricts Y travel some when the Kurt vise is on.

    The tray is fabricated as is the base.

    The table did not have the usual oil holes so I drilled it for oil cups to oil the table feed screws. The ways are easy enough to get to with and oil can.
    Ken

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    NW Illinois
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    15

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    Dave
    "Do you have any intermediate pictures and any hints or tricks you picked up along the way."

    Not many, however, below are three. Out here in farm country I have the luxury of space and power equipment and the pictures refelect this. After removing everything from the basic hulk, I made use of a pressure washer to help clean crud and strip paint. I painted the inside white to aid in being able to see in there. Being able to raise it up helped a lot.
    Ken






  6. #26
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    Aug 2012
    Location
    NW Illinois
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    Thank you all for your generous and encouraging comments.
    Ken

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Colchester (where the lathes were made)
    Posts
    161

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    I have it in the back of my mind that the mill is neither a TM or UM, but a "Cataract 5" production mill.
    Hardinge did seem to make quite an array of variants

    What's that lower square hole in the RHS of the main body for? Power feed gear box perhaps? (another difference to the UM/TM)

    Bill


    BTW I found I used my Haighton Major(UK made UM copy/variant) as a horizontal more than a vertical (the Haighton's vertical clearance is even more restricted than on your machine) .

  8. #28
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    Aug 2012
    Location
    NW Illinois
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    [QUOTE=BillTodd;793459]What's that lower square hole in the RHS of the main body for? Power feed gear box perhaps? (another difference to the UM/TM)[QUOTE]

    Bill,

    After rechecking, it appears that the "square hole" was put in by an owner merely to make access to the electric motor junction box easier.

    Ken

  9. #29
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Colchester (where the lathes were made)
    Posts
    161

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    Hi Ken,

    No, not that one

    I'm talking about the cast in access panels - UM/TMs have the upper one for access to the spindle, but not the lower panel.

    It's in the place where the UM/TMs have their power feed pulley mount.

    Regards,

    Bill

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    SE Cheesehead land, WI
    Posts
    557

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    For anyone interested, here's a neat horizontal Hardinge in the chicago area.
    If only I had more room....

    http://chicago.craigslist.org/wcl/tls/3245429264.html
    Last edited by T.Hoffman; 09-06-2012 at 08:12 AM.

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