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Thread: OT: Sharpening Scissors

  1. #1

    Default OT: Sharpening Scissors

    My wife is a quilter. She handed me a box of scissors and asked if I could sharpen them. Well, it's metalworking, sorta, so I agreed to undertake the job, particularly as the alternative is to (gasp!) pay to have someone else do it. So off to the computer and Google, and eventually wind up at Wolff "Twice-As-Sharp" system. I have an 8" slow speed grinder that I like for sharpening wood turning tools, and I thought that the combinatation of the grinder plus the arms and clamp from Wolff would be a good solution. Yeah, I know I could make them, but that is a project too far. Before laying down the credit card I thought I would solicit the experience of the forum. What say you guys? Oh yeah, the budget for this is in the range of $250 US so anything more expensive would have to be converted into a DIY project. I don't really need another one of those, but ......

    http://twiceassharp.com/

    Thanks
    Carl

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    678

    Default

    I always sharpened them by hand on a knife sharpening stone. You only hone the one edge, keep at it until the edge "disappears". It needs to be a smooth edge. What I've done probably isn't as good as a factory edge, or maybe what that grinder can do, but so far they've done OK.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    405

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    These videos about how fine scissors are made might give you some inspiration, especially the hand finishing steps.

    http://youtu.be/LHucRh0NTPo

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kjb-NMkMNhg

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2003
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    52N 122W Western Kanuckistan
    Posts
    40,418

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    Just don't run while your doing it.
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Origin now settable to bottom left! All values positive. Click Here

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,502

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    My wife also is an experienced sewer. In addition, she owned, (briefly,) a wool and yarn shop, specializing in embroidery yarns and supplies. As part of her services, she had me sharpen scissors.
    All I did was darken the bevel angle of each blade with a black or blue Sharpie, and then hone the ink away with a hand-held stone or diamond padle. Most scissors only took a few strokes, and the diamond was definitely quicker. A few minutes would serve for most pairs, but if I ran into pin-nicks, they took more time. Was I successful? Everyone who used the service was happy. I cant remember what my wife charged as it was thirty years ago.
    If all you are doing is sharpening scissors for your wife and maybe her friends, then I cannot see how you can justify a sharpening rig.
    BUT, if you want a sharpening rig, and the scissors are an EXCUSE, then THAT is an entirely different matter.
    Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    1,834

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    Here's one at Sam's Club... $80.22.





    http://www.samsclub.com/sams/chef-s-...ci_sku=101509S

    You can buy it and try it. If it works for you then keep it... if not, they'll take it back.

    It's also available at stores other than Sam's Club.

    If you want more info, it's a ScissorPro Model 500

    http://www.chefschoice.com/page2a.html

    .
    Last edited by Mike Burdick; 09-21-2012 at 02:04 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    731

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    Draw file with appropriate needle file.

    This method was used to save the life of six year old son, who used mother's sewing scissors instead of sheet metal shears!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Beaumont, TX
    Posts
    7,250

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    I have a much simpler method of sharpening scissors. I hold a 1/16" drill bit (even a broken one will work) by the flutes in my left hand and just try to cut the round shank with the scissors. Use heavy pressure. The drill bit should be angled at the same angle as the original sharpened edges of the scissors. The scissors just slide along the drill bit and that hones the edges. A half dozen such strokes is usually enough. I then dry cut with them an additional half dozen times to remove any burr.

    Quick and simple and it produces a very good edge. This method has the additional advantage of not removing any metal from the scissors so they last a lot longer. In some cases a very light dressing with a fine stone can improve the edge after this procedure. VERY LIGHT.

    This method will not work if there is moderate or severe damage to the cutting edges. In this case, the more drastic methods above should be used. Personally, I would use my slow speed, wet wheel for that.
    Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 09-21-2012 at 02:29 PM.
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    3,903

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    I have a much simpler method of sharpening scissors. I hold a 1/16" drill bit (even a broken one will work) by the flutes in my left hand and just try to cut the round shank with the scissors. Use heavy pressure. The drill bit should be angled at the same angle as the original sharpened edges of the scissors. The scissors just slide along the drill bit and that hones the edges. A half dozen such strokes is usually enough. I then dry cut with them an additional half dozen times to remove any burr.

    Quick and simple and it produces a very good edge. This method has the additional advantage of not removing any metal from the scissors so they last a lot longer. In some cases a very light dressing with a fine stone can improve the edge after this procedure. VERY LIGHT.




    This method will not work if there is moderate or severe damage to the cutting edges. In this case, the more drastic methods above should be used. Personally, I would use my slow speed, wet wheel for that.

    My grandmother would do that and then take several cuts on a piece of very fine sand paper until she was satisfied her scissors were sharp.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Western central Fl
    Posts
    441

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rustybolt View Post
    My grandmother would do that and then take several cuts on a piece of very fine sand paper until she was satisfied her scissors were sharp.
    My grandmother used to do the same thing with a coke bottle, using the section where the cap crimped on.

    Ken

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