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Thread: OT: pulling a vacuum in 5 gal buckets

  1. #1
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    Default OT: pulling a vacuum in 5 gal buckets

    I can find many hand pumps for pulling a vacuum in a plastic sack, vacuum seal bags or in glass jars, but nothing that looks practical for 5 gallon buckets. The larger ones look like they are going to get into the 3 digit dollar range, which is not good at this time. The buckets are full of things like grains, cloth items, light tools and such. What I want is enough vacuum to firmly seal the snap-on lid down on the gasket.

    I don't have the valve figured out, yet, but I think a flap valve style thingy would be fabricated fairly easily. Or, perhaps a standard tire valve, since I don't need a full vacuum, just some reverse pressure.

    Pops

  2. #2
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    One od the cheap harbor freight air conditioning pumps would work. Or just about any diaphragm pump.

  3. #3
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    is 17 - 20 inches of mercury enough vacuum? I think you can get that from a tap on the intake manifold of a petrol engine at idle.

  4. #4
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    Google "aspirator pump"
    "I am not academically qualified. I am what I call QBE - thatís my degree - Qualified By Experience."

    Rupert Neve, Audio Technology Magazine Issue 1, March 1998

  5. #5
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    Or just heat the contents and bucket to about 200 degrees then put the top on. When it cools, it will be under vacuum. So much so, that you'll probably have to punch a hole in the top to open it. The bucket will handle the heat but you have to watch the contents. You probably wouldn't even need to go that high of a temperature. Maybe 50% over ambient.

  6. #6
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    I experimented once with surgical tubing and air pressure. Apply pressure, and at a certain point, the tubing suddenly goes from swelling slightly to a much larger diameter. If you mounted it within a cylinder that has that same inner size and shape, the first expansion will drive out all the air inside the cylinder. Then as you remove the air pressure, the tubing will collapse and draw a vacuum in the cylinder. With suitable in and out valves, and a suitable valve to control the air, you could generate a vacuum.

    In practice, you would keep the size of the cylinder enclosing the section of surgical tubing to something smaller than the expanded size of the tubing. That way it would probably last quite some time, plus having a smaller final diameter it will have more 'pull' when contracting.

    This is a way of getting a pretty good vacuum by using your compressed air system. Probably not super efficient, but very compact and no rings to leak, oil to fill, etc. In and out valves could be simple- the main item would be the pressure side valve to alternately pump, then release, pump, release, etc.

  7. #7

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    A shop vac should work fine for that.
    Craftsman 101.07403
    Grizzly G0704
    4x6 Bandsaw

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by kd4gij View Post
    A shop vac should work fine for that.
    I was wondering about that. K.I.S.S.
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  9. #9
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    Plastic pails with sealable lids don't do vacuum very well. The polypropylene wants to yield and will in hot weather relieving the internal vacuum to a certain extent.

    Oxygen and light is the enemy for long storage items, particularly food. Why not a nitrogen purge? Set a small container of LN2 in the bottom of the pail, fill it with your goods and a dessicant bag, and place the lid (which with a brick on it to make a very low pressure check valve) without sealing it. After a time the LN2 will evaporate diffusing through the contents, sweeping up the air and O2 ahead of it. and escaping the lid. After a few hours seal the pail and you're done.

    Use a food grade black pail and you will be certain of no funny smells or flavors and no light degradation. When properly sealed they are DOA certified to seal tight for food containment.

    Maybe there's a link here: http://www.google.com.bz/search?hl=e....1.a_pbacSaNMc

    If not contact the survivalists. They may be nuts about some things but they have long term food and valuables storage pretty well worked out
    Last edited by Forrest Addy; 10-17-2012 at 08:55 AM.

  10. #10
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    The pail will fold/crease/dent in on itself over time. I forget for what (I think bleeding brakes or sucking oil out of a crankcase) but I tried pulling a vacuum in a pail before, it started to work then I had a mess on the floor.

    This is unless you plan a very little amount of vacuum in the pail.
    Andy

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