Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 29

Thread: Bandsaw blade guides

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Lancashire, UK.
    Posts
    247

    Default Bandsaw blade guides

    I have a couple of bandsaws, one built from a kit of castings probably before I was alive.
    Following a bit of use I need to do a bit of revamping.
    The blade is guided at the back of the cutting table by a couple of ball bearings, LJ1/4 which I have got anew, however the sides of the blade are guided by simple pieces of hard leather, sort of a rub guide.
    What could I replace these with, I dont think the machine needs or is worth the effort of fitting ball bearing guides in replacement, I need something 1/4" square section hard wearing.
    I might try some delrin and see if that works, I have some brass keysteel but I think that'd have all the local dogs barking.
    Build it, bodge it, but dont buy it.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Keller, Texas
    Posts
    420

    Default

    I think the delrin will melt. I use HSS lathe tool stock, works good.
    I've also seen micarta (aka phenolic) blocks used.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Huntsville Ala
    Posts
    5,024

    Default

    The older wood saw technology used what was called "cool blocks", which is a phenolic material impregnated with lubricating stuff. All the ones I've seen were on the order of 3/8" cross section. Can you modify the holders to accomodate that size? ....Not that I know 1/4" is not available.

    A google search found this, wherein some are recommending using hard wood ,e.g maple. See here: http://lumberjocks.com/topics/15161

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    north bay area
    Posts
    4,196

    Default

    I'd go with brass, or even Maple guides. Maple end grain is pretty tough, put a few drops of oil on them, they will last for a LONG time.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,474

    Default

    I use "Cool Blocks" as mentioned above. They can be adjusted to an interference fit to the blade, and the graphite lubricates. When the get a bit chewed up by the teeth, I just sand them square and reinstall them. The only problem with HSS blocks is that WHEN (not IF,) the blade gets a bit out of vertical alignment, and the teeth touch the blocks, kiss the blade goodby. You will loose the set of the teeth on one side or other and the blade then consistently cuts crooked, (while it scorches the wood!)
    Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Metcalfe, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    509

    Default

    Lignum vitae would make a good guide, probably a little better than hard maple.Maybe as good as cool blocks, and a lot easier to cut to shape. A pen blank should be enough for a set of guides.

    Dave Cameron

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    north bay area
    Posts
    4,196

    Default

    Agreed with the lignum vitae,, i think it is not only hard and dense, but somewhat oily.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Keller, Texas
    Posts
    420

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Duffy View Post
    ... The only problem with HSS blocks is that WHEN (not IF,) the blade gets a bit out of vertical alignment, and the teeth touch the blocks, kiss the blade goodby. You will loose the set of the teeth on one side or other and the blade then consistently cuts crooked, (while it scorches the wood!)
    I have always set up the thrust bearing to maintain the side guides just behind the base of the gullets, I've never had a side guide come in contact with the blade teeth or the set portion of the blade. My bandsaw came factory equipped with plain steel guide blocks, the HSS works much better.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Kirkland, Washington
    Posts
    933

    Default

    I have tried the "cool Blocks and wasn't impressed. I now use maple with some wax. When making the maple for the guides I made several feet of material the correct cross section. When the guides get worn I switch ends and run some more. When the second side gets worn I throw them away and cut new ones off the prepared stock. I tried the Ball Bearing guides and found them too noisy.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Yorkshire, Centre of the known Universe
    Posts
    1,888

    Default

    Burgess used Tufnol rod.

    Regards Ian
    You might not like what I say,but that doesn't mean I'm wrong.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •