Page 12 of 157 FirstFirst ... 210111213142262112 ... LastLast
Results 111 to 120 of 1568

Thread: What did you machine today?

  1. #111
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    USA MD 21030
    Posts
    5,550

    Default

    I am "currently" working on an electric tractor conversion, which has involved some machining. Here is a picture of it after taking it apart, cleaning, painting, and partial reassembly, showing approximate locations for the battery box and 3 phase 1 HP electric motor:



    This shows how I was machining the rear axle bearing support so I could install a flange mount ball bearing to replace the old worn plastic bushing. I have the end mill held in the milling machine Jacobs chuck, and the MT2 shaft kept getting loose.



    I got the job done, but it was more difficult than it should have been. Now I have proper mill holders and future work should be much easier. This is the finished assembly. I filled in with epoxy to support the flange better:



    Something else I did was to bore out a bronze sleeve bearing to fit the steering column. The original plastic bushing was worn and sloppy. This was the first time I used the boring bar set and is perhaps an unusual way to do it:


  2. #112
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska
    Posts
    1,440

    Default

    I recently purchased a brand-spanking-new CNC Mill. It came with a 4th axis but in its current state, before mounting a chuck, a fixture needed to be fabricated to which a 4-jaw chuck can be mounted. "Hold-down-devices" were also needed thus all had to be fabricated.

    The dividing head had a tapered center hole so I decided to use that as the reference off which everything would be centered. A "spindle-hub" was fabricated and threaded (6TPI). The tang fit perfectly in the center hole. Deep "groves" were cut in the spindle hub which would be used to clamp the back of the spindle securely against the face plate. Miniature "clamping-bars" (X 3) were fabricated from 4140 each having a lip that is to slip into the grooved spindle. Additionally, vertical 3/8" slots were milled in each bar so that bolts would have room to move when bolting the clamping-bars to the 4th axis faceplate and spindle body. On the reverse side of each clamping bar, a horizontal 5/8" groove was milled approximately 1/2 the diameter of the cutter deep into each clamping bar. Three pieces of 5/8" round 4140 stock were cut to accommodate each grove. The function of the round stock and grooves is to serve as a pivot-point when securing the clamping bars. When the round stock is in place, there is a greater distance between the faceplate and the clamping bar than the distance from the lip of the bar when resting against the wall of the grooved hub so when bolts are tightened, each bar will pivot on the round stock without the round stock becoming displaced and the opposite end of the bar will clamp firmly against the hub.

    Lastly, three T-Nuts were fabricated from 4140 and these fit perfectly into the three T-Slots. I drilled and tapped each for 5/16" dia bolts.

    Following are three images. The first image is the 4th axis w/o fixtures. The second is the 4th axis with all fixtures attached, and the third image is of the 4th axis sporting the 4-jaw chuck. That's what I did today.

    Harold







    Last edited by hwingo; 10-23-2013 at 03:55 AM.
    For those having fought for it, Freedom has a flavor the protected will never know.
    Freedom is only one generation away from extinction.

  3. #113
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    6,911

    Default

    Harold, not sure if I should focus my attention to the machining subject matter of your pictures or the quality of the photos themselves.
    Nevertheless very nice work.
    Photos from a phone will never look the same again.
    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

  4. #114
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska
    Posts
    1,440

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Willy View Post
    Harold, not sure if I should focus my attention to the machining subject matter of your pictures or the quality of the photos themselves.
    Nevertheless very nice work.
    Photos from a phone will never look the same again.
    Good Morning Willy! Let's see ...... you are in BC so it's just about as dark there as it is in the Great Country of Alaska. I've been up since 0530 hrs and we can actually see stars for a change. It has rained everyday for nearly three weeks. There may have been a brief reprieve for an hour or so but in the main it's rained every day. Even at 1500 feet elevation, we are floating off the side of the mountain. Our ground is saturated.

    Well, I just couldn't pass up the opportunity to shoot some B+W and these subjects are perfect for B+W work ...... of course if one can control reflected light and pesky "hot spots". I was presented with two challenges:

    1. fabricating everything needed to make my 4th axis usable in my setting
    2. running the gauntlet while attempting to exercise Command & Control over my vision for these images

    At least the fabricated parts are working.

    I appreciate the shout-out. Have a great day.

    Harold
    For those having fought for it, Freedom has a flavor the protected will never know.
    Freedom is only one generation away from extinction.

  5. #115
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska
    Posts
    1,440

    Default

    My neighbor recently had an issue with his Honda 4-Wheeler. The rear-end came apart while riding and the rear tire became lodged against the body. Having diagnosed the problem, and because he is a weldor, his answer to most everything is to either cut it out or cut it off then weld a suitable replacement. In this case, the internal attachment between the frame and the rear-end housing had failed. Having done a bit of searching, he found an old frame which was then cannibalized. He cut out the needed section and set about figuring ways of cutting his current frame and then re-attaching with the cannibalized part. It was a daunting task that would include a great deal of expended effort but it could be done.

    I suggested an easier “fix”; use a hole saw to cut out the area containing the damaged internal part and replace with newly fabricated parts. This would mitigate what amounted to an unnecessary need for complete frame disassembly.

    When this project began, I had not considered posting to this thread so photographic documentation didn’t begin until most preliminary work had been completed and parts had been fabricated. Regardless, I can post an “after-action-report” with supporting photographic documentation.

    Step 1: It was decided to first surgerize the cannibalized section and use the surgerized section as a template for parts fabrication. More over, this would be of benefit serving as a “dry run”. The first “order-of-march” was to fabricate a drill-guide to ensure that the hole was cut on-center as much as could be since cutting would be done with a hand drill and hole saw. The hole was cut thus removing the internal threaded area that had been damaged.








    Step 2: The next step was to fabricate a part serving to replace metal that had been removed since a large hole was created during removal of the damaged area. Living in Alaska where much core drilling is done, an old piece of drill stem was procured. The OD was turned to slip-fit into the surgerized hole in the frame, the ID was bored to true inside with outside of the replacement part, and inside was prepared to receive the next fabricated part.

    For those having fought for it, Freedom has a flavor the protected will never know.
    Freedom is only one generation away from extinction.

  6. #116
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska
    Posts
    1,440

    Default

    Step 3: A much smaller, but terribly rusted piece of drill stem was cleaned up in the lathe. The OD was turned to slip-fit into the previously fabricated part. The ID was badly rusted and it was bored to true the inside with the OD and sufficient rust was removed during the boring process to barely have “enough meat” for internal threading at 16 TPI.



    Step 4: The next “call to worship” involved duplicating (with modifications) the part that screwed into the damaged area. Since the original part had metric threads but the previously fabricated part was threaded at 16 TPI a duplicate part was made but threaded at 16 TPI. Additionally, the original part had the equivalence of a ½” hex recess which was used for tightening the bearing-supporting “screw-in plug”. I have no way of reproducing the hex recess so I fabricated a “screw-in-plug” having an integral hex head via mill and dividing head.



    Step 5: The final step was to fabricate the internal locking nut. Though the smaller drill stem was in poor condition, I continued to fabricate the locking nut from this material cutting 16 TPI. For lack of clean material, threads turned out “just ok???”. Well, they screwed on and held together well enough to tighten. A tri-lobed area was cut in the locking nut using the mill and dividing head.





    This concluded parts fabrication. The final process is to cut a hole in the frame, insert the sleeve and weld in place, then insert the threaded collar, position, and weld in place. Finally the repaired frame will be set to juxtaposition and using the internal plug and lock nut everything will be secured as designed. The hole was cut last night and the sleeve was inserted to test for fit. It was getting late so welding will commence today and hopefully culminate with successful completion of the project. This is what I did yesterday in my humble shop.

    Harold
    Last edited by hwingo; 10-26-2013 at 04:50 AM. Reason: added rest of post
    For those having fought for it, Freedom has a flavor the protected will never know.
    Freedom is only one generation away from extinction.

  7. #117
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Columbus Texas
    Posts
    792

    Default

    Well last night I finished up one of the injection mold projects.

    One pass .80 deep 10% step over 6000 rpm 930 or 1320 ipm I think

  8. #118
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Stevens Point, WI
    Posts
    8,192

    Default

    Made a sending unit adapter.





    Andy

  9. #119
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Central Ohio
    Posts
    1,098

    Default

    My humble contribution to this thread is a Lee hand priming tool shell holder. It's only a $5.00 part, that's unobtainable now. I don't feel like spending $30 for a new improved tool, and a $30 shell holder kit. Dimensions are .615 OD X 32TPI for the interested.[URL=http://s558.photobucket.com/user/mcostello/media/leeprimertool.jpg.html][IMG]
    Last edited by Mcostello; 11-02-2013 at 10:59 PM.
    mark costello-Low speed steel

  10. #120
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    31,565

    Default

    Didn't machine a dang thing..... but I did scrape-in a shaper ram, and start in on the ram ways portion of the column.

    I really don't want to do this machine, because I haven't been using the other shaper that is together. But it's in the way. The only path to getting it OUT of the way is to put it together and either use it in place of the other one, or dispose of it to some other chump. And that re-assembly is fairly worthless to do unless I scrape the thing into alignment and with decent contact on it's various ways and sliding parts, replace the bad bearings, etc.

    So I am stuck. I've been avoiding working on this machine for a couple years, with part of it sitting on the workbench, but now I need to use the whole length of the workbench. So first I have to get this thing done before I can do what I want to do. Ugh. I don't even want to take a pic to prove it....
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •