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Thread: What did you machine today?

  1. #1541
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
    To be fair, they are an oddball size, and jaws are hard to find for it.
    Why? We purchase those fairly frequently. They're not even expensive.

  2. #1542
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    Apr 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
    Pretty great feeling when you can make whatever tooling you need, to make whatever it is you need to make lol. Albeit it a pain in the ass sometimes when you HAVE to.
    Yes, it CAN be! The hardest part is balancing doing so AND getting the customer's parts out the door in timely fashion. I freely admit to still riding the high of figuring out the specifics of making the Gear Shaper Cutters. I cannot even begin to convey how nice it is to be relieved of the dependence upon the five manufacturers of Shaper Cutters. Mostly, it is the independence from their 12 - 24 week wait times for cutter needs. We pushed a job out the door in two weeks that we were given a 16 - 20 week lead time for cutters on. THAT is a GREAT feeling. And knowing that we can make ANY tooth form, ANY Pitch, ANY Pressure Angle, and any combination of them in as little as a day ( if necessary ) is really a game changer for the shop. ( as well as my personal pride )

    [QUOTE=jdedmon91;1251832]What model Fellows gear shaper is that. I cut my teeth on one in my first shop. Eaton had a bunch of hydro strokes they used for years. Just neat machines. The only thing neater is a bevel gear cutter

    It's a 7125A Special. It began life as a Sector Gear Shaper for the Navy. Most of the Sector Gear bits have been removed or replaced with standard bits. Was a complete and utter piece of ****e when it got here. If I had known it's true and actual condition, I would never had let it be delivered. But our back was against the wall with commitments, so we paid the piper and performed a complete re-manufacture upon it. I don't ever want to go through that again.

  3. #1543
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    Kendal, On
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zahnrad Kopf View Post
    Why? We purchase those fairly frequently. They're not even expensive.
    My memory is a bit hazy on the specific details (it's been a couple years) but I recall it's an oddball Japanese chuck with non standard size serration and pitch. I'm sure one could find cheap jaws for it but I was under a time crunch, and being new to the CNC lathe world (still am) my google fu wasn't coming up with anything. Being in Canada wasn't helping the timeline any either. From memory I think it's an 8" chuck with an 11mm tslot groove and 1.5mmx60* serrations and M8 bolts. I'll check on tomorrow when I'm back. It think it was the 11mm slot with m8 bolts that was the hard to find part. Lathe is a Nakamura Tome tw-20.

    Side note while we're on the subject.... How much jaw movement is acceptable? When you clamp/unclamp these jaws they rock back and forth what seems to me an very large amount (~0.05"+). I'll try and get a video tomorrow. I would have thought the moving jaws would be tighter and more restrained than that. But so far the 2 jobs I've used the chuck for over the last couple years have turned out ok lol. Most of what I use it for is bar work on the left spindle every couple of months. It doesn't get used much, and nobody else in the shop is interested in learning how to use it, so it's kind of my baby.

  4. #1544
    Join Date
    May 2015
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    387

    Default What did you machine today?

    This is a replacement shifter linkage for a Honda dirt track car. The rubber one busted


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  5. #1545
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
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    Began a gang tool holder that will fit in a QCTP tool block. I would not do this if the parts were steel or aluminum but they are POM (Delrin is a brand name).

    Estimated time for 500 parts is 316 hours using a 1998 CNC lathe without a tool changer simply a QCTP, this will require 2500 manual tool changes just for the first operation. The part looks roughly like so without the bearing bores shown which are part of the first operation.


    Each end has a bore on the drawing of .500" +0.000 -0.002 X .563" +-0.005" deep on each end, there is a 3/8" through hole for the shaft that passes through the bearings pressed into each end when assembled.

    Each of the 3 OD (for lack of a better term) features have a radius of .114" and as an added bonus are different diameters of 1.344" +0.002-0.000. 1.321" +0.000-.002 and 1.280" +0.002-0.000. There is a radius of .0.200" at the bottom of each feature which are the same diameter of 1.105".

    Milled an aluminum block to fit the tool post holders.


    Put it in the tool post and drilled and reamed holes for the tools to be held by set screws from the chuck, gave each hole a tool number. The hole for the 1/4" boring bar has not been drilled yet it needs a holder to fit in the holder (-:


    80 roughed parts, this took 2 days already including setup.


    I do not like doing repetitive work such as this job, normally I would set up and program a part that does not require any manual tool changes on these machines, then a 20 something year old part changer can run thousands of them with little problem. 5 manual tool changes per part would be chaos for a part changer, my goal is to have zero tool changes so that someone else can run the parts.
    I may be dreaming with this machine however.

  6. #1546
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    Jan 2014
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    In the desert
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    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

  7. #1547
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
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    102

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    Began the last operation on these parts today, only 270 more to go.

    Using a full radius 1/8" wide Topnotch grooving tool, the finish is excellent.

    Each of the 3 radiused diameters is different with a +.002" -.000" tolerance, these parts are very difficult to measure so I suspect that I will have no hair left by the end of this week, the Customer has a CMM however so I have to keep them in the ball park, fortunately they will not measure all 280 parts.

  8. #1548
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    durban s africa
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bented View Post
    Began the last operation on these parts today, only 270 more to go.

    Using a full radius 1/8" wide Topnotch grooving tool, the finish is excellent.

    Each of the 3 radiused diameters is different with a +.002" -.000" tolerance, these parts are very difficult to measure so I suspect that I will have no hair left by the end of this week, the Customer has a CMM however so I have to keep them in the ball park, fortunately they will not measure all 280 parts.
    Whats the form tool look like. Does it plunge in to do all three or are they seperate operations? What does CMM mean.? Nicely done.

  9. #1549
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    Jun 2019
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    102

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    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    Whats the form tool look like. Does it plunge in to do all three or are they seperate operations? What does CMM mean.? Nicely done.
    CNC lathe not a form tool, a single tool follows the toolpath.

    Coordinate Measuring Machine, think of it as a 3 axis mill with a touch probe where a cutting tool would be and will measure a part accurately in 3 axes.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coordi...suring_machine

  10. #1550
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    Nov 2006
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    durban s africa
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bented View Post
    CNC lathe not a form tool, a single tool follows the toolpath.

    Coordinate Measuring Machine, think of it as a 3 axis mill with a touch probe where a cutting tool would be and will measure a part accurately in 3 axes.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coordi...suring_machine
    Sorry read your post a while back and saw a pic of the gang tool and just assumed it was manual.

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