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Thread: What did you machine today?

  1. #1211
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Tropical Milwaukee, Wisconsin
    Posts
    445

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    Bridgeport Shaper Head Pinion Gear replacements.


  2. #1212
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    2,452

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    Very nice!

  3. #1213
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    29,727

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    Very nice indeed.

    I need to get a grinder capable of cylindrical grinding, and a surface grinder.... Good ground surfaces look so nice, and they are needed for some things.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  4. #1214
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Watford, UK
    Posts
    342

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Burch View Post
    It's a bit lacking in loveliness, but it works. Now all I have to do is train myself to send Morse with paddles, using my left hand while writing something different in the log with my right. It will be interesting to see how/if a 74-year-old brain is up to the task!
    I think you'll find that it has a certain industrial-chique je ne sais quois to it.....and if the 74 year old brain can cope with making it, I'm sure it'll adapt to using it soon enough.

  5. #1215

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Burch View Post
    Finally finished all the machining on my home-brew Morse paddles.
    The base and bridge were milled from mild steel, the pillars and adjusting screws were turned from 316 and the shafts from aluminium, and the finger pieces carved from a local red pine called Rimu. The bearings are miniature sealed ball bearings.
    It's a bit lacking in loveliness, but it works. Now all I have to do is train myself to send Morse with paddles, using my left hand while writing something different in the log with my right. It will be interesting to see how/if a 74-year-old brain is up to the task!
    Your brain will be just fine, in fact once I used a Iambic key I never wanted to go back to a pump key. You'll find yourself adjusting things getting the key dialed in how you want it, but after a week or so going back to a pump key will feel wrong in some ways. Did for me anyway, though I haven't done any cw for years now I'm afraid.
    Only real comment is those return springs look quite strong, you might find you can run even weaker ones if it feels better and improves sensitivity for going really quick.

    Zahnrad, nice gears, wouldnt expect anything less from you

  6. #1216
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    durban s africa
    Posts
    1,271

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    I feel real STUPID but what am I looking at?.Morse paddle?

  7. #1217
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Watford, UK
    Posts
    342

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    It's a fancier (read: harder to use but faster once you get the knack) morse code transmitting key. It's only obvious if you already know the answer

  8. #1218
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Kendal, On
    Posts
    1,272

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    -.-. --- --- .-.. / - .... .- -. -.- ... / ..-. --- .-. / ... .... .- .-. .. -. --.

  9. #1219
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    East Coast, USA
    Posts
    6,984

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    It will actually work, unlike a 2500 baud modem.
    Work hard play hard

  10. #1220
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    616

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    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    I feel real STUPID but what am I looking at?.Morse paddle?
    Apologies, Plunger. I should have been more explanatory.

    Back in the 1800s, the first telegraphists used the up-and-down or "straight" keys which are still common today. Many of them developed "glass arm", or Occupational Over-use Syndrome (OOS) as we would call it these days. So someone came up with the idea of using a sideways movement instead, and that reduced the problem. Paddles are the most recent (though decades old) iteration of the sideways idea.

    Depending on which of the two paddles is squeezed, a signal is sent to either the dot-maker or the dash-maker in the transmitter, which then forms the actual dot or dash that is transmitted. This has several advantages, not least that the correct dot:dash ratio of 1:3 is automatically achieved—something that's surprisingly hard to do on a straight key.

    If both paddles are squeezed simultaneously, the electronics send alternating dots and dashes. This has given rise to these paddles becoming known as "iambic keyers", from the term for the poetic metrical foot called an iamb—an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed one, such as "The CURfew TOLLS the KNELL of PARTing DAY".

    Despite my having been a ham since 1964, I still have great difficulty in decoding Morse at any sort of useful speed, so I'm not looking to up my sending speed with this gadget. Hams consider it only polite to reply to a call at the same speed, so if I were to speed up my sending I would understand even less of any response!

    Cheers (or "73" in Morse abbreviation parlance),
    Mike.

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