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Thread: What did you machine today?

  1. #1221
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    durban s africa
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    1,271

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Burch View Post
    Apologies, Plunger. I should have been more explanatory.

    Back in the 1800s, the first telegraphists used the up-and-down or "straight" keys which are still common today. Many of them developed "glass arm", or Occupational Over-use Syndrome (OOS) as we would call it these days. So someone came up with the idea of using a sideways movement instead, and that reduced the problem. Paddles are the most recent (though decades old) iteration of the sideways idea.

    Depending on which of the two paddles is squeezed, a signal is sent to either the dot-maker or the dash-maker in the transmitter, which then forms the actual dot or dash that is transmitted. This has several advantages, not least that the correct dot:dash ratio of 1:3 is automatically achieved—something that's surprisingly hard to do on a straight key.

    If both paddles are squeezed simultaneously, the electronics send alternating dots and dashes. This has given rise to these paddles becoming known as "iambic keyers", from the term for the poetic metrical foot called an iamb—an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed one, such as "The CURfew TOLLS the KNELL of PARTing DAY".

    Despite my having been a ham since 1964, I still have great difficulty in decoding Morse at any sort of useful speed, so I'm not looking to up my sending speed with this gadget. Hams consider it only polite to reply to a call at the same speed, so if I were to speed up my sending I would understand even less of any response!

    Cheers (or "73" in Morse abbreviation parlance),
    Mike.
    Thank you for the explanation. So when I scold my daughter because she is getting sore fingers from texting too much and I tell her that her ancestors never suffered problems like hand over use, I am not totally correct.

  2. #1222
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Sunny So Cal
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    4,521

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    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    Thank you for the explanation. So when I scold my daughter because she is getting sore fingers from texting too much and I tell her that her ancestors never suffered problems like hand over use, I am not totally correct.
    Good Morning SA. JR
    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

  3. #1223
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Concord, California
    Posts
    335

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    Good looking paddle, Mike. Looks like it's not likely to slide around on your table with all that heft.

    I've been inactive for years but still have all the gear in a closet. I mostly worked CW and loved my iambic paddle - vast improvement over the old bug (Vibroplex key).

    One thing: I found the most comfortable paddles were close together so my thumb and forefinger were about 1 cm apart, with the spring tension just enough to reliably return the paddles to neutral position. You might find it more comfortable with thinner paddles and the paddle arms adjusted as close as possible.

    -73, KF6R
    There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

  4. #1224
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    219

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    I finished up my drive dog plate last week for my Grizzly. I started with a backplate I got from Shars the added a steel top plate to it. It was a series of videos to do the build for my YouTube channel. If your interested here is the links

    https://youtu.be/_PYYjCHx9aU

    https://youtu.be/OTH0j5xwXl8


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  5. #1225
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    New Zealand
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    616

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    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    Thank you for the explanation. So when I scold my daughter because she is getting sore fingers from texting too much and I tell her that her ancestors never suffered problems like hand over use, I am not totally correct.
    Alas, no! OOS has been around a long time in various guises, but does not seem to have been taken particularly seriously until the last few decades.

    The advent of word-processing keyboards has caused a big upsurge in OOS, for two main reasons. Firstly, the old-fashioned typewriter required the operator to pause every few seconds to use the carriage return, shoving to the left a big lever on the end of the carriage. With the automatic line feed of an electronic keyboard, typists never need to pause their typing, so don't get that frequent momentary respite. And secondly, with the advent of computers, blokes can now type as well as women, so there is far more use of keyboards than there was even thirty years ago.

    And now with texting, teenagers are the latest victims. And since they are all ten foot tall and bullet-proof, there's no stopping them!

  6. #1226
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Watford, UK
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    342

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    Also the old-school typewriters required actual force to drive the keys down so it forced the operator to have their hands in the correct position (wrists up) in order to apply that force. Now with keyboards that are just little rubber domes no real force (or travel for that matter) is required so people let their wrists slouch down and it means the tendons in the wrist are going round a corner rather than being straight.

    Your texting victims will only get it in their thumbs!

    Incidentally, it's called RSI here in the UK. Repetitive Strain Injury. Also Carpel Tunnel syndrome for the wrists.

  7. #1227
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Watford, UK
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    342

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    Been working on some Delrin for a change. This is essentially a tool clip for a Dyson vacuum cleaner tool.....but I guess you could argue that a lot of the value is in the associated learning curve.




    Everything went well until it dawned on me that the ID and the OD should not be concentric.



    Does anyone have any tips on how to accurately offset a piece in a 4-jaw so that the OD will end up lining up with the OD of the tool it is to hold? I'm figuring I'll need to centre the piece and then use a dial indicator lined up with one of the jaws to measure a 5mm offset....but I'm definitely open to any tips and tricks if anyone has them I did contemplate doing it all on the mill with a boring head but the only short bars I have that fit it are brazed so I don't think they're sharp enough - I used aluminium profile inserts for this on the lathe - and it's probably a good thing to learn eccentric turning on something that has zero chance of killing anyone if I get the offset wrong!

  8. #1228
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    Central Ms
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    917

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    Sounds like you've got it figured out using the 4 jaw and indicating the offset. Just be sure to index the part correctly if that is an issue.
    “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

    Lewis Grizzard

  9. #1229
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    Deep in the Heart of Texas!
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    7,627

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave C View Post
    Sounds like you've got it figured out using the 4 jaw and indicating the offset. Just be sure to index the part correctly if that is an issue.
    I'm glad he does because I don't know what the heck he's doing.

  10. #1230
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    Nov 2017
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    Watford, UK
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    Thanks Dave. Indexing wasn't an issue when the part was concentric - just pick any starting point and the other slot is 180 from that. Once eccentric, the slots will need to be 90° from the thinnest point. I'm hoping I can index based on indicating the jaws of the chuck.

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