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Thread: What did you machine today?

  1. #1291
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    Kendal, On
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    1,484

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    Puting some precision "scratches" in a nice new job. @7:00 on a Friday night..... Almost home time.

  2. #1292

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    A hand wheel that just had bolts to turn it. I ordered some threaded knobs, and threaded some rods on the lathe. Simple project, but it is so much better than the bolts.


    Last edited by junkaddict; 02-16-2019 at 10:57 PM.

  3. #1293
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    Dec 2008
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    Made some quick and dirty drive hubs for a yarn skein winder last night. Milled from square scrap and faced the backside. They ain't pretty, but they'll work.

    Should be able to get the rest of it completed this weekend minus the drive motor and yardage counter/controller. The plan is to be arduino based, but I'll have to fire up the noggin and do some thinking for that part. I havn't done any "practical" arduino projects yet, nor wrote any custom code, so It will be a learning experience. But, that's the whole reason I got one (and all the other related electrical stuff), so.....

  4. #1294
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Watford, UK
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    435

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    Dan: Was going to suggest an optical gate that a protrusion on the wheel breaks every time it turns but that would only give you a rev count and not yardage since the diameter would change as the yarn winds over previous windings. You might have to have some sort of wheel that the yarn passes over (and turns) and then count the revs of that. You could tell direction of travel as well if you used two gates with a slight offset between them so that gate 1 fires before gate 2 if winding on and the reverse if winding off. There's also rotary encoders that may do this in a more compact package. Just some random thoughts for you....on the off-chance they're useful

  5. #1295
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    Dec 2008
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    Kendal, On
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cenedd View Post
    Dan: Was going to suggest an optical gate that a protrusion on the wheel breaks every time it turns but that would only give you a rev count and not yardage since the diameter would change as the yarn winds over previous windings. You might have to have some sort of wheel that the yarn passes over (and turns) and then count the revs of that. You could tell direction of travel as well if you used two gates with a slight offset between them so that gate 1 fires before gate 2 if winding on and the reverse if winding off. There's also rotary encoders that may do this in a more compact package. Just some random thoughts for you....on the off-chance they're useful
    To calculate the yardage I was planning on having an input into the controller based on the position of the arms. There are marks (well not yet, but there will be) on the arms for 1, 1.5, and 2 yards. I bought some hall effect sensors, and was planning on counting that way, but an optical sensor sounds interesting too. Never thought of that. The offset gate idea also sounds great, and I'll file that away for future uses. This electrical land is all new to me. So much to learn.....and so many possibilities.

    Would an optical sensor be more reliable than a hall effect sensor? I just looked them up (in between typing this all up), and I think I could make one work, and it might be easier to implement. Where and why would one use one over the other? (can of worms maybe?)

    The wife (and her friends) are keeping keeping me busy with things to make, and products to "invent" for her yarn dyeing business. This is a small niche market and some products already exist, but there are a few things that I've thought of to do different and help streamline her process and make it more efficient. I want to start doing small batch runs of products and see how they sell. Maybe it works out, maybe it doesn't, we'll see. A skein winder was actually not something that I was interested in doing at all, as there are already a few small companies making them already and I hate "copying" people unless I can think of a different way to do it (I have). But she need's one and with a lead time of 2-4 weeks, and $1500 I opened my big mouth and said "I can make that..." you know how it goes..... She won't get the fancy controller yet, it's a planned upgrade (parts on on the slow boat), but I hope to have at least an armstrong model working by the end of the weekend. I think I've got a mechanical counter somewhere she can get by with until I figure out the magic pixie version. She's got a couple big shows coming up and there's yarn everywhere in the house waiting to be skeined up, as that's one of her major bottle necks right now (the other being a full time job). She's tried employing child labour this week on March break, but it turns out a 4 and 6 year old cannot be reliably trusted to run an umbrella winder lol .

  6. #1296
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Watford, UK
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    I'd love to tell you how I have lots of experience with both ways and can tell you the pros and cons....but to be honest all I've got is a collection of random knowledge acquired by osmosis and some ideas because it sparked some curiosity of the 'Hmm, now how would you do that?' variety.

    My colleague always used to joke about rearing his own child-labour back in the days when there was any money in building 10, 20 PCs for a customer. His eldest is something like 12 and there's no sign of cheap labour yet. These things seem to take a lot of maturing before there's a return of investment!

  7. #1297
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    Nov 2017
    Location
    Watford, UK
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    I've got one of those irritations that has been annoying me for too long. Finally got it fixed. The shower hose needed replacing a while back and the new one didn't quite sit snug in the tapered holder so it flopped from side to side. Tried ordering a cheap replacement clamp but that turned out to be too small instead. So I decide to extend the taper of the hose end so it would slide further in and make proper contact with the tapered holder. Easy job, but a few minutes work! Yeah, the naivety still hasn't worn off! Main issue was that the high quality (hey, I paid five bucks for it, it must be good!) G1/2 die was tapered on both sides for a considerable amount of the die. Cut a 2mm relief between the shoulder and the thread and it still wasn't full depth. In the end, I had to dig out a 55 thread tool that came bundled with the lathe and hand turn the thread to depth. I say "hand turn" in that I literally turned the spindle over by hand and encouraged the carriage to follow the thread by putting light pressure on the wheel. Why? Well, I'll be honest that I couldn't be bothered to look up the thread tpi and then change the gear set....and there was only about 8 thou to take off. Anyway, here is the not-particularly-impressive item I'm so proud of





    The taper isn't as bad a match as it looks in the pic. The start is a little too small but that's from all the sanding I had to do because it seems my top-slide leadscrew is bent.

  8. #1298
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Scunthorpe,North Lincolnshire,UK
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    30

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    Did some playing yesterday and today, I had a Duplex D27 Toolpost Grinder, which I'd adapted to fit my Colchester Master 6 1/2" Roundhead, but the motor expired and none could be had at a sensible price, other than a complete setup, which again was eye wateringly dear, so....

    I thought about modifying some other motor, but all that could be used from my collection was a 'JCB' 13mm Pistol Drill, I had previously made a toolpost clamp for said drill to drill division plates held in the lathe.

    I proceeded to remove the chuck, but it didn't seem to play ball, until I spied an Allen socket deep inside the chuck, it took a bit of reasoning to realize it was LH, then it was easy.

    I made a crown pulley from some 2 1/4" 6082(H30), which gave me approx 2:1 pulley ratio, and the drill running at 2,700rpm seemed about right for 150mm Dia wheel.

    BUT I don't have grinder guard yet, so used the chuck guard down for safety.

    All this faffing about is to grind down a 10.0mm hand reamer to re-purpose for re-bushing a pair of 1 1/2" SU carburettors from an old Spitfire(Triumph) not plane.

    I'm grinding the reamer with a longish 6mm pilot, then I'll have to re-sharpen the flutes to 9.5mm Dia on my Clarkson MkI, for the replacement bushes supplied.

    Below are a few Pics including some of a re-purposed Drill Grinding Chuck to clamp a set of bike fork yokes, to turn down a spreader nut, that didn't want moving.



















    Added a couple of pics of my mod to the Colchester, my cross-slide screw is worn,

    but I'm reluctant to tear it to bits at the mo, so slackened the backlash adjustment slightly to give full free travel.

    That means that sliding travel is uncontrolled accuracy wise, (cross-slide won't maintain positional accuracy even with a feedscrew clamp).

    Hence the new to me Cross-slide clamp, works wonders, keeps the slide still and very accurate, DRO doesn't indicate any movement, and diameters are consistent, really pleased.
    Last edited by rotorhead; Today at 08:52 AM.
    Chris Wright. (UK)

    Colchester Master 6-1/2", Elliott Rapidmil, Clarkson T&CG Mk1+.

  9. #1299
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    NE Thailand
    Posts
    1,090

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    Eeeee by 'eck.
    Sunny Scunny!
    Nice work Chris,
    regards from NE Thailand.

  10. #1300
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Scunthorpe,North Lincolnshire,UK
    Posts
    30

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    Thanks Thaiguzzi,

    with a name like that I presume you're in Moto-Guzzi bikes then.
    Chris Wright. (UK)

    Colchester Master 6-1/2", Elliott Rapidmil, Clarkson T&CG Mk1+.

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