Page 1 of 18 12311 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 176

Thread: DIY slip roller, tubes or solid?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Stevens Point, WI
    Posts
    7,627

    Default DIY slip roller, tubes or solid?

    Looking to possibly build a slip roller. Some of you may have seen the fire ring I made, I made the ring with my brake and bending a slight amount every 1.5-2". I would like to make a slip roller for future fire rings and whatnot. Questions I have are use a tube or solid for the rollers? Anyone have some plans for one or have built their own? I am looking to be able to roll 1/4"x10" possibly 12". I assume if tubes are fine, the wall thickness should be thicker than the material being rolled? Thanks much for any help!
    Andy

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    232

    Default

    Hi,
    For what its worth my 22 Ga. x 24 " Pexto rollers are solid. Guessing about 2" in diameter. ( not close by or I would measure for you )

    Brian
    Toolznthings

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Northeast, PA
    Posts
    1,158

    Default

    I am also going to say solid, but I am not sure. I would think you may need around a 3-4" rollers to roll 1/4" in a 12" section. I would also think about powering it, that is some heavy cranking to roll that thick unless you have it geared down, then it is just a lot of cranking.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    South Texas
    Posts
    987

    Default

    If you are going to make the rolls larger in diameter you could probabaly use tubing. The problem will be that you still need to have some type of bearing and it would probably be easier to make a sold roll of smaller diameter. A larger diameter roll would mean lower forces. a smaller diameter roll would mean the curve would go closer to the end of the strip. rolling after the welding would make it more round.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    gettysburg pa.
    Posts
    889

    Default

    the gearing idea is right. i would look at a roller for making the tires for the old wooden wagon wheels.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Deep in the Heart of Texas!
    Posts
    7,714

    Default

    I too would go with solid rollers. It's often cheaper than cored or thick wall tubing of the same material. You'll want something that's harder than the stock you're rolling or the rollers will scar. The force necessary to bend 1/4x12" mild steel will vary greatly depending on the distance between the outside rollers. The inner roller would need to be able to apply this force and outer rollers would need to support it without much deflection. The force may be any where from several hundred pounds at 12" to several tons at 6" between rollers.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Portland Oregon
    Posts
    712

    Default

    I know a guy that took a HF tubing roller and remanufactured it to a slip roller using the wheel and some home made parts for his. It did have solid rollers as we had a (shared 10') stick of 3" CR steel that we both have used some of. I will see him next month maybe I can get a picture but not any sooner then end of July. We have used it for sheet metal up to 16ga works real well, 1/4" probably would go OK but might be a real workout to crank.

    Mr fixit for the family
    Chris

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    1,141

    Default

    I'm trying to design a roller as well. Only I want to do 1/4"x36" if I can get away with it. I picked up some 4 1/4" solid round at auction last weekend I'm hoping will work. Anyways.....my press brake chart says that 1/4"x12" will take 4.5 tons with a 5" V die. So I'm guessing centers on the rollers need to be a little over 5" to require the same force.
    The real problem is figuring how much roller deflection is acceptable and how big of a roller it will take to minimize that deflection.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    30,087

    Default

    Solid doesn't add a lot to the bending strength after a certain thickness, but it does improve the crushing strength, which you need for rollers...

    Solid.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Northeast, PA
    Posts
    1,158

    Default

    ^^^^ I think that 4.5" may be border line for 1/4" at 36 wide. This one uses 6" for 1/4" at 48 wide. http://metal.baileighindustrial.com/plate-roll-pr-403

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •