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Thread: Need your wisdom: facing a thin piece in lathe

  1. #1
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    Default Need your wisdom: facing a thin piece in lathe

    Hey Folks,

    I have a dilemma and could surely use your wisdom. I have fabricated an arbor for a new diamond wheel. The diamond wheel will be used on my bench grinder to sharpen cobalt, high speed steel, and carbide lathe tools. The arbor is fabricated from aluminum. Itís .645Ē thick with a 5/8Ē hole in the middle.

    One side was faced true and then cut off using a parting tool, hence, only one side has been faced true with the spindle. I would like to true the face of the opposite side. The arbor is so thin that I do not have a way to chuck the piece square with the spindle and *know for certain* that itís square with the spindle. Hopefully Iíve said that right. I am using a 4 jaw chuck therefore I will need to indicate. There must be a way to hold the piece in the chuck and true the face and be assured that when faced, the new face will be square with the opposite face.

    I canít remember where I read a thread on holding a thin washer in a lathe chuck so as to enlarge the hole. I assume I would need to do something like that.

    How would you go about accomplishing this?

    Harold
    For those having fought for it, Freedom has a flavor the protected will never know.
    Freedom is only one generation away from extinction.

  2. #2
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    Default

    Glue the 'good' side to a faceplate?

  3. #3
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    I would put a piece of barstock in the chuck that you turn to diameter and with a square shoulder, say 1" diameter starting material. Then clamp the washer against the shoulder with a length of tube and a live center in the lathe tailstock. Then face the washer. Then you grab the OD of the washer and relieve the area where the tube clamped the part.

  4. #4
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  5. #5
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    Not sure i completely follow you, but if i dont have a set of soft jaws i can re-bore or face for the step i need, i'll use hard jaws and milling parallels between the work piece and face of the chuck... Thats with a three jaw, might be alittle tough to do that with a four jaw.

    I'll turn the chuck so the jaws are 12, 4 and 8 o-clock, lay one of the parallels on top/across the bottom two jaws, set the part, hold the second parallel on the bottom of the 12 o-clock jaws and snug everything up...

    _

  6. #6
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    Another way would be set your part against the face of the 4 jaw chuck and use four 1/2 inch pieces of square stock between the part and chuck jaws and use the end of a bore bar to face part.
    jimsehr

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Artful Bodger View Post
    Glue the 'good' side to a faceplate?
    After posting my problem, I thought about using glue. Perhaps chuck another piece and face that piece then use crazy glue to glue the true side of my part to the newly faced piece. I would assume that would get me close if not right on. Once glue has set, face the part.

    1. As long as the trued faces are glued together, assuming they are in even contact across the surface, would it really make any difference if the part I need is actually centered? It wouldn't seem really necessary.

    2. How would I get the two pieces apart?

    Harold
    For those having fought for it, Freedom has a flavor the protected will never know.
    Freedom is only one generation away from extinction.

  8. #8
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    ...
    2. How would I get the two pieces apart?
    Cyanoacrylate's (super glue) will melt if placed in boiling water or heated.

    But be warned, using super glue may pose a problem if your work piece gets too hot during machining.


    .
    Last edited by Mike Burdick; 07-17-2013 at 03:12 AM.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by hwingo View Post
    Hey Folks,

    I have a dilemma and could surely use your wisdom. I have fabricated an arbor for a new diamond wheel. The diamond wheel will be used on my bench grinder to sharpen cobalt, high speed steel, and carbide lathe tools. The arbor is fabricated from aluminum. It’s .645” thick with a 5/8” hole in the middle.

    One side was faced true and then cut off using a parting tool, hence, only one side has been faced true with the spindle. I would like to true the face of the opposite side. The arbor is so thin that I do not have a way to chuck the piece square with the spindle and *know for certain* that it’s square with the spindle. Hopefully I’ve said that right. I am using a 4 jaw chuck therefore I will need to indicate. There must be a way to hold the piece in the chuck and true the face and be assured that when faced, the new face will be square with the opposite face.

    I can’t remember where I read a thread on holding a thin washer in a lathe chuck so as to enlarge the hole. I assume I would need to do something like that.

    How would you go about accomplishing this?

    Harold
    Why do you need to indicate it? If you're only making a facing cut, it shouldn't matter if the OD is running true. The Artful Bodger's reply would be the easiest to do and probably the most accurate since it doesn't put any stress on the part. Super glue works well and acetone will dissolve the glue when you're done.

    p.s. I see the thread was updated while I was posting...
    Last edited by elf; 07-17-2013 at 03:20 AM. Reason: thread updated

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by elf View Post
    Why do you need to indicate it? If you're only making a facing cut, it shouldn't matter if the OD is running true. The Artful Bodger's reply would be the easiest to do and probably the most accurate since it doesn't put any stress on the part. Super glue works well and acetone will dissolve the glue when you're done.

    p.s. I see the thread was updated while I was posting...
    Elf, you actually asked my additional question more succinctly than I. That's right, why would I need to indicate if I am only facing? You answered my question with a question which means we were thinking along the same line. We will know in a minute if this works. I just went into the shop and luted the two pieces together. I will wait another 4 or 5 minutes and begin taking light cuts until it either falls off or it is faced.

    Harold
    For those having fought for it, Freedom has a flavor the protected will never know.
    Freedom is only one generation away from extinction.

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