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Thread: Want to make a bench grinder arbor

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Denver
    Posts
    168

    Default Want to make a bench grinder arbor

    I've been looking into bench grinders and found a few options:

    http://www.grizzly.com/products/8-1-...-Grinder/G0596

    http://www.grizzly.com/products/10-1...-Grinder/G0597

    http://www.grizzly.com/products/12-3...-Grinder/G0599


    Then I got to thinking since I have a 3hp 3phase motor with vfd, why not make a heavy duty double ended arbor? I can't find threaded rod to use that has both LH and RH threaded ends. I found this but it doesn't say the threads are opposite.

    http://www.mcmaster.com/#threaded-pr...shafts/=od8zb6

    Are there premade rods that can be used for this application? The pillow blocks and guards can be sourced but the rod would be great to find ready made.

    Thanks in advance for the help.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Kansas City area
    Posts
    3,182

    Default

    The McMaster threaded rod will be all right hand threads.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    SW. Michigan
    Posts
    450

    Default

    I was at the scrap yard a few month ago as i looked around for usable steel i saw this old 8" bench grinder with babbitt bearings it had all the guards and grinding rests. I figured i might as well take it so this winter when i get the blahs i will rework it hopefully can use pillow block bearing on it. The price was right

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Eureka, California
    Posts
    210

    Default

    PT Doc,

    In my opinion, the most important part of the bench grinder would be the arbor, its run-out and accuracy. This...IMHO would require you to make it from TG&P shaft with left hand and right hand threads turned on the appropriate ends. Good, accurate collars and bearing fits would be paramount as well. These are the things that make a smooth running grinder, no matter how large. I built a 10" grinder from scratch, paying attention to these details and it worked out very well.

    Make sure you don't over-speed the wheels with your frequency drive!

    Stuart

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Denver
    Posts
    168

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by atomarc View Post
    PT Doc,

    In my opinion, the most important part of the bench grinder would be the arbor, its run-out and accuracy. This...IMHO would require you to make it from TG&P shaft with left hand and right hand threads turned on the appropriate ends. Good, accurate collars and bearing fits would be paramount as well. These are the things that make a smooth running grinder, no matter how large. I built a 10" grinder from scratch, paying attention to these details and it worked out very well.

    Make sure you don't over-speed the wheels with your frequency drive!

    Stuart
    By picking the right pulley size I would be ble to not over drive the wheels that I choose.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Eureka, California
    Posts
    210

    Default

    Doc...sort of true, but remember, if one wanted to, the drive (VFD) could be programmed for a max output of probably 400 Hertz. The stock motor will run at nameplate RPM at 60 Hertz so it's not out of the question, pulley size or whatever, to scatter those big wheels all over the shop. Not likely with half a brain but it could be done.

    Stuart

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Cheyenne Wyo
    Posts
    643

    Default

    I made my buffer with collet ends and nuts, then the arbor stays with the wheel. Think of the business end of a Dremel tool. Not commercially available... but once you true the wheel on it's arbor it stays that way.
    I'm here hoping to advancify my smartitude.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    N.E. oHIo
    Posts
    465

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PT Doc View Post
    Then I got to thinking since I have a 3hp 3phase motor with vfd, why not make a heavy duty double ended arbor?
    You need a copy of this book: http://www.amazon.com/Spindles-Works...e+series+books


    Rex

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    551

    Default

    FWIW, Grainger sells motor shaft arbors for grinding wheels with RH and LH threads and for 1/2" and 5/8" motor shafts.

    http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/sha...rue&Pid=search

    RWO

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Bremerton Washington
    Posts
    5,007

    Default

    You got a lathe? Can you borrow one?

    Bench grinder arbors are much better if purpose machined. Nuts, washers. and pipe spacer on threaded rod does not cut it. Besides being lame looking and ugly (not a problem with me) they will not perform well (a big problem with me). A threaded rod arbor will be crooked, run out of balance, and a re-mounted wheel will require heavy dressing to true it up.

    Square shoulders, machined flanges, accurate bearing fits, true running RH and LH threads, and a smooth diameter to center the wheel on are all vital attributes for a good grinding arbor. The bearings can be pillow blocks (bronze or ball) or in a machined housing. It could be a monument to home shop fabrication or a simple belt driven arbor in bearings in the same fashion uor grandpas made theirs.

    I bet I made a million bench grinder arbors over the years - well 50? 30? something like that. I made one for my dad in sealed housings. It was a monster made to his design to fit a 16" wheel he scrounged. We got it all set up but before we mounted the wheel, I "rung" it - tapped it with a screwdriver handle. Clunk! Not "ding" but "clunk." It was cracked. Rats. We had an arbor but no wheel. Too bad. A wheel that size would go for $200. I still got the arbor and bearings.

    Anyway, you can buy heavy pattern RH and LH nuts but the arbor and flanges if not store bought as arbor components have to be made.

    But it starts with a machined arbor.
    Last edited by Forrest Addy; 09-05-2013 at 02:09 PM.

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