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Thread: two-engine scrapers

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Phoenix
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    Default two-engine scrapers

    Construction has begun on a 67-unit housing development in my neighborhood. I had a look at the two Caterpillar 627G scrapers on the job. I'd never walked around one of these before so was surprised to see that they have an engine in the front, another in the rear.



    There are two throttle pedals in the cab, one for each engine. That must take some getting used to.



    The 627G is a medium-sized scraper. How big to these things get?
    Allan Ostling

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Tonawanda, NY
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    347

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    Good lord, what size lathe do you use that sucker on?!

    (Oh not that sort of scraper! )

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    north bay area
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    Great pics!! Not sure how many yards the bucket is, but yup "Pull and Push".
    When i was 8 or so used to ride my bike out of town to watch scrapers like that working at building the 4 lane hwy #401 in the early 50's.
    Those scrapers were branded "Turnopole" (Spelling.)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    Spokane
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    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch View Post
    Those scrapers were branded "Turnopole" (Spelling.)
    Tournapull, made by the R.G LeTourneau Co.

    Dave

  5. #5
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    Thanks Becksmachine, it was exciting times for an 8 year old to watch these mighty machines bounce along.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    South Texas
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    Two engine scrapers are fairly common.

    RG Letourneau made one with 8 engines and 3 scraper pans and 6 axles. Was used near Longview Texas when building Interstate 20. It may also have been used during the construction of Lake of the Pines in East Texas. It was HUGE! Seems like it was something like 1200 Cu. Yards.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    SW Michigan
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    I've seen the old single engine "pans" as we call them & when full they had to be pushed with a dozer, so this cures that problem.
    You can lead people to knowledge but you can't make them think.
    "Lead, follow, or get out of the way."-Thomas Paine

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Central Ohio
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    909

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    Quote Originally Posted by becksmachine View Post
    Tournapull, made by the R.G LeTourneau Co.

    Dave
    As a side note R. G. LeTourneau was a truly amazing engineer. He had virtually no education (he didn't even finished high school) and learned welding, fabrication, and mechanics in the field. He was a prolific innovator and amassed hundreds of patents during his life.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by kf2qd View Post
    RG Letourneau made one with 8 engines and 3 scraper pans and 6 axles.
    The only reference I have found to this is from http://www.ritchiewiki.com/wiki/inde...trous_Machines. I wish we could see a photo.

    With the development of the Electric Digger series in the 1950s, LeTourneau’s company manufactured the world’s largest motor scrapers.[4] The Goliath, or Model A4, was the biggest motor scraper built to date. This model contained an electric motor in every wheel. Following the Goliath was the development of the LT-360. This scraper, the biggest ever built, included three bowls for a capacity of 216 cubic yards (165 m3). It moved, with the power of eight 635 horsepower engines, on eight wheels that each measured more than 10 feet (3 m) in diameter. LeTourneau’s scrapers never sold in large numbers; they were mostly considered experimental.
    Allan Ostling

  10. #10

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    Thanks to leading me into some research and photo viewing.
    Being a midwest farm boy I really never had the opportunity to see heavy industry until the web and all contributers made it available.
    http://photostp.free.fr/phpbb/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=8607

    It appears LeTourneau has made some interesting behemoth's.

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