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Thread: A new engine for fall---

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    7,479

    Default A new engine for fall---

    My heart rate and blood pressure have returned to normal, now that I am completely finished with my version of the Nemett Jaguar. I don't WANT to build anything else until fall.
    Then I want to build a totally new engine that is not a modified version of some one else's design. Oh, it will still have all the standard things, --piston, con rod, crankshaft---you get the idea.
    ---I am very interested in the gearless engines, just because of how different they are. I have also learned from Malcolm Stride and whoever (Mr. Webster, I assume) designed the Webster engine. I really like that cantilevered crankshaft design as used in the Lynx and the Webster--it so greatly simplifys the crankshaft manufacturing. There is also the big plus that with a gearless type engine and an "atmospheric" intake valve, no camshaft or camshaft bearings are required.
    I won't build another engine with a wet sump and splash oiling, because it is simply too difficult to keep track of the oil level once the sump is all buttoned up. I have been doing some research, and in addition to "sealed for life" ball bearings, one can also purchase "sealed for life " needle roller bearings and sleeves. In my mind, these would be almost perfect--sealed ball bearings for the crankshaft and sealed needle roller bearings for the big and little ends of the con rod.
    I probably won't try and use cast iron rings again. I have proven to myself that yes, I can make them, but it is a very "chancy" operation, and even when working at their best, they don't give the compression that a Viton o-ring does.
    I have proven to myself that old style points type ignition is both cheaper and far less susceptible to damage than the new electronic ignitions, but they are bulky and take up a lot of room compared to a magnet and pick-up, so the jury is still out on which I will use.
    --I like the hit and miss style of engines, because there is a bit more neat mechanism available to see operating, and the real big plus is that these engines run extremely cool because of the fact that when in "miss" cycle they constantly circulate room temperature air thru the cylinder which keeps it cool.
    --I would use a cast iron cylinder, and possibly a cast iron piston, as this will be a slow revving engine so the inertial weight of the piston won't be that big a deal.
    ---After designing and building the "Rupnow Engine" and seeing that it wants to levitate at any speed above 50 RPM I will definitely find a way to balance the crankshaft with bolt on weights.
    That all for now. If any of you fellows know of any real nifty "gearless" mechanisms, please let me know. I have plans here for the Philip Duclos style gearless engine, also for the old "star wheel" type as seen on full size hit and miss engines, and the nifty one that Myrickman posted on Modelenginemaker forum. I would be interested in any other gearless designs that I am not aware of.----------------Brian rupnow
    Brian Rupnow

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    north bay area
    Posts
    4,810

    Default

    man, you are ADDICTED!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Lol

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Central Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,199

    Default

    An elbow engine perhaps?
    Precision takes time.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    1,840

    Default

    Maybe try something more exciting, like a jet engine.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    1,840

    Default

    With an afterburner.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
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    Default

    Maybe I'm retrograde (I think that's the word.) The engines which interest me predate the jet engine by about 100 years!!
    Brian Rupnow

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Lower SE Michigan, USA
    Posts
    1,546

    Default

    Brian,
    My Olds is a gearless design, using a star-wheel type of "cam". See: http://www.deboltmachine.com/id2.html for details, but no closeup pics. Can send those to you if necessary.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ashburton, near Christchurch New Zealand
    Posts
    6,128

    Default

    Brian, if you want to build something a little different take a look at the principles of the monosoupape aero engine of WWI, just one cylinder of course. It has ports for induction and a single valve for exhaust.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    USA MD 21030
    Posts
    3,700

    Lightbulb

    From a total off-the-wall brainstorm, I came up with a few crazy ideas.

    As I contemplated alternative fuels, such as vegetable oil, I tried to think of other ways to cause a confined explosion, and I considered the principle of a gun. So you might be able to rig up an automatic loader that would take blanks from a belt, like a machine gun, or even pick them from a loose pile, insert each one into the end (breech) of a cylinder, lock, and fire. The bore would have a piston instead of a bullet, and would connect to a crankshaft.

    This might cause too much pressure too quickly to be practical, but perhaps each blank could cause a larger chamber to fill with pressurized gas, and then that would be used like a steam or compressed air engine. It could be similar to a hit or miss engine in that a low pressure in the reservoir would cause the next charge to be inserted and fired. Practical - no, loud and annoying - probably, but unique - BINGO!

    For a small model engine, maybe caps as used in toy pistols could be used, if you can still get them.

    I have heard that a gas engine can be modified to "burn" water by replacing the spark plug with the klystron of a microwave oven, and using it to vaporize a small amount of water that has been injected into the "combustion" chamber or cylinder. Of course you can't extract more energy from water than you use to vaporize it (or to create oxygen and hydrogen), unless somehow you can create even a tiny fusion reaction. Otherwise, this will really be an electric motor, although not using the traditional electromagnetic methods.
    https://answers.yahoo.com/question/i...5214112AAVet77
    http://www.keelynet.com/energy/microeng.htm
    http://lofi.forum.physorg.com/Microw...gine_5884.html


    Perhaps there are other materials that could be used as fuel. What about using dust (coal or dry grain, like flour) to cause an explosion:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dust_explosion

    Or could you use Ammonium Nitrate, or even ammonia? There was a hydrogen car that ran on 95% ammonia:
    http://www.greencarcongress.com/2007...en_engine.html
    http://www.voxsolaris.com/nh3driver.html

    Well, enough craziness for one post. Maybe this will generate some useful ideas.
    Last edited by PStechPaul; 07-16-2014 at 08:37 PM. Reason: microwave water engine links

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Kansas City area
    Posts
    4,967

    Default

    There have already been engines that used gunpowder for fuel.

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