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Thread: Look what I found!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    12

    Default Look what I found!

    http://imgur.com/a/V2lkl

    I found an old horizontal mill in a welding shop in Alberta, and brought it home for almost nothing plus about a billion dollars in gas. It doesn't match any of the models on lathes.co.uk under Denbigh, does anyone know anything about it? Looks like it was originally driven from an overhead lineshaft, and has been converted to a 1.5HP motor with a pulley reduction to the countershaft such that there's about 5HP at the countershaft going about 500 rpm. It's got the 3-3/8 overarm, so it's at least older than 1956. The dividing head it came with was made by a company in New York that went out of business around 1925.

    Someone in the past had painted the ways, making it hard to operate, but perfectly preserved the metal underneath. A few good days with some paint stripper, and I have a nearly unworn, 90 year old milling machine.

    I posted my progress with it on another forum but decided to harvest the text and pictures so I could more easily share it elsewhere too, I thought I'd post it here in case someone had more information about the thing. I've had to strip it to it's components to remove the industrial mud that formed from nearly 100 years of dust laying on well oiled surfaces. Every oil hole was clogged, but it all seems to have nicely preserved the thing. It just sat there, unused, preserved by industrial fruitcake, for decades. I took a stab in the dark by comparing to other plain bearinged lathes to try to guess on adjusting the spindle, and decided on 0.0015" side and end play to allow for an oil film. There's a bit of scoring on the thrust surface of the front bearing that seems to have raised some material that I may need to scrape down, 0.0015" of end play gives me 0.0035 or so side play. Because of this I'm using a thicker oil in the front bearing and a thinner oil in the rear bearing. Some guidance there would be greatly appreciated.

    I'm using an iso32 AW series hydraulic oil in the spindle, which seems to be working well. I can't decide on belt tension though. I've gone with just enough tension so there's no slipping while the spindle comes up to speed after the motor turns on, but I'm worried about side-loading that bearing so much. Maybe it's nothing. It's definitely not exceeding the bearing's PV with that tension.

    http://digiex.ca/machining/Denbigh-u...-pre-1956.html

    I've since dissassembled the vertical head and reshimmed the bevel gears to give correct tooth contact and solve a huge howl it used to have. Next thing to do is strip and install the overarm bar and re-cut the rusty taper on the milling arbor. Gotta make an ER chuck for the horizontal spindle too so I can use those same collets in either spindle. I also need to take apart and clean that dividing head, and make a chuck adapter for my chucks, but it's operating like it's new. Barely used. The power feed is too fast for use with normal sized endmills, it's like it's designed for a 16 or more tooth milling cutter. I might put an additional electric motor on it and slow it down.

    Thoughts? I've not seen this model anywhere on my internet searches.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Big Prairie Mi.
    Posts
    1,456

    Default

    Looks like a nice machine. I was looking for a horizontal with vertical head for years. Good machines to have.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    494

    Default

    Great score! This never happens too me- every old mill or lathe I've looked at has been either overworked or under water

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    206

    Default

    It does look cool.

    But, reducing speed via pulley or any other mechanical method does not increase horsepower. It will increase torque.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    Independent principality of Sinquefieldia (formerly Missouri)
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    17,134

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by andywander View Post

    But, reducing speed via pulley or any other mechanical method does not increase horsepower. It will increase torque.
    Most of the time torque is just what you want to have, to *preserve* HP at the slower speed. There is absolutely no problem.

    It does not increase total HP. But it can drastically increase the percentage of available HP that can be applied to the task at hand. That's generally what is wanted, HP decreases as speed decreases, unless you proportionately increase torque. Magically, that's just what pulley reduction does..
    Last edited by J Tiers; 10-22-2014 at 06:49 PM.
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    Hashim Khan

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Essex, UK
    Posts
    143

    Default

    Thanks for the pictures. Your machine looks to be in very good condition, very nice indeed! I am refurbishing a similar machine, identical except mine doesn't have the swivel table. There is very little information available on these machine. There is a Denbigh group on Yahoo but all the machines seem to be much later. My machine was originally powered from a wall mounted countershaft, I fabricated a side mounted arrangement similar to yours. I used a 47mm wide poly v belt on the cone pulleys, no joint so you have to take the spindle out to fit it, it took me about half an hour to remove and replace the spindle, runs well! I spent today cleaning up the table (60 years of dirt on it) It's got a few scars but the ways look OK so I will live with it. I had to rescrape the spindle bearings, quite a lot of scoring, I scraped the front bearing until I had good contact on both the taper and the angled section and then scraped the taper again so it doesn't lock with end thrust. I'm trying the machine with a light hydraulic oil for the spindle but there is a lot running out when the spindle is turning. Your drip feed oiler may be the answer for this. You may need to turn the oilers on a few minutes before you start the machine, to allow some oil to get to the spindle. Dave

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    206

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by J Tiers View Post
    Most of the time torque is just what you want to have, to *preserve* HP at the slower speed. There is absolutely no problem.

    It does not increase total HP. But it can drastically increase the percentage of available HP that can be applied to the task at hand. That's generally what is wanted, HP decreases as speed decreases, unless you proportionately increase torque. Magically, that's just what pulley reduction does..
    I didn't say it was a problem, just that the OP was incorrect in what he posted about horsepower increasing.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Winchendon MA
    Posts
    758

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    I have to ask is that a Ford Ranger that you transported it in, if yes then your's are bigger than mine.

  9. #9

    Default

    Cool looking Mill how much does it weigh,what part of Alberta did you find it!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Metcalfe, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    561

    Default

    Wading through that HP-torque-speed double-talk, it appears we've got a couple of politicians on this forum.

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