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Thread: Drilling Oil

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ezduzit View Post
    Interesting post.

    Found this thread while searching for the proper cutting fluid for milling and turning stainless that is to be welded.
    Sorry for thread necrophilia but didn't want to start new thread.
    I have used olive oil or olive/canola-mix for a while in drilling, tapping and reaming because I have some sort of allergy and get a nasty rash immediately if using "normal" cutting oils or sulfurized gear oils.
    Seem to work as well as average cutting oil. Wipe clean after use and occasionally give the tools a squirt of WD-40 or way oil and wipe clean to prevent polymerization and getting your tools "varnished"

    But the canola oil makes the shop smell like the local burger joint french fries...

    I think next time I have some nasty stainless to tap I'll try this handy lard packed in a tube:
    https://www.prisma.fi/fi/prisma/muurikka-silava-110-g
    Last edited by MattiJ; 01-11-2017 at 02:59 PM.

  2. #12
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    Just yesterday I saw a recommendation in an old Model Engineer, by Tubal Cain, I think, to use rape seed oil for tapping.

    You'll probably have to settle for the PC renamed canola oil, and hope they haven't bred all the good stuff out of it.

  3. #13
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    I use bacon grease a lot in the shop. It works really well, and doesn't spill because at room temp it is a paste. Lard is also good and it has less salt. In a number of videos I've made it shows me using it, always generates interesting discussions.

    Some people worry about it going rancid, and I'm sure it will. I just keep the stuff in the fridge and when I need more in the shop I just grab it. Butter will last a fair while sitting on the counter in the house.

    I've found that bacon grease smokes a lot less than the Rocol RTD I have in the shop. As for tool life, I've never really paid that much formal attention, but I do know that bacon grease significantly improves surface finish and reduces tool wear in general.

    Cutting fluid is rather pricey. I use to just garbage bacon grease. What's not to like?

  4. #14
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    When I first started metal work threading oil was whale oil, temaxol I think the name, distinctive smell.
    Swarfega green for Ali btw
    Mark

  5. #15
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    Here is a recent study from NIST:
    http://nvlpubs.nist.gov/nistpubs/nbs...cpaperT204.pdf

    I think that at the dawn of the industrial age the driving force to use mineral oils in cutting fluids has been price. 100 years ago vegetable oils and animal fats were expensive. Thanks to today's agriculture subsidies and and intensive farming you get extra virgin grade olive oil cheaper than mineral based cutting oil.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by enginuity View Post
    Butter will last a fair while sitting on the counter in the house.
    Speaking of: Indian "Ghee" or sort of clarified butter would probably also work well. And it stays good in room temperature for ages. I had a jar of clarified butter in a cupboard for probably over 3 years and it would have been still edible with only a slight rancid smell.
    For shop use I think its even worse than "french fries oil" because it has a very appetizing nutty and caramel-like aroma.

    Clarified butter..drool... that's have to be good for tapping

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by mattthemuppet View Post
    peanut oil would probably be no good as it has a much lower flash temperature than other vegetable oils. Olive oil is similar but not quite as bad.
    I think you have that backwards. Peanut oil actually has a higher smoke point (and thus a higher flash point) than many other oils. And about the same to as much as 50C higher than the very generic "vegetable oil" depending on brand and quality of the vegetable oil vs peanut oil. That's why it's favored for high temperature flash frying. There's only a few somewhat special cooking oils that have a higher smoke and flash point than peanut oil.

    I had a jar of clarified butter in a cupboard for probably over 3 years and it would have been still edible with only a slight rancid smell.
    I think you'd find that the "slightly rancid smell" would multiply rapidly once heated and if you actually used it. So it had been "gone" for some time before that 3 year point.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by yf View Post
    As any old time blacksmith will confirm, if sulfur is present, iron will not be weldable. I Don't know about non ferrous.

    Black old fashioned cutting oil is sulfur based, says right on the jug.
    .
    ??? you're not welding the oil (i hope). The sulfur that makes welding next to impossible is that alloyed into (free cutting) steel....at least I've never heard of the sulfur in oil being an issue for welding

    I'd grab any mineral oil if I was out of cutting oil instead of vegetable.....I don't know what ones will dry and what ones will rot so don't really want to take the chance
    .

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mcgyver View Post
    ...
    I'd grab any mineral oil if I was out of cutting oil instead of vegetable.....I don't know what ones will dry and what ones will rot so don't really want to take the chance
    I think nearly all of them do. All it takes is having "double bonds" in the molecule, and I think that is very common.

    I have read of putting olive oil in a clear bottle in the sun, with a strip of copper in it. Supposedly after "some time" of that, it will no longer polymerize. I have no clue whatever if it is true, but it may be that the metal ions catalyze some reaction that uses up the double bonds.

    Likely if you wash off the oil, there will be no issue.
    1601

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  10. #20
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    I tried vegetable oil once. It was an inexpensive, store brand and I don't remember what vegetable it came from. I wound up with a sticky, gummy mess that was hard to clean off of my lathe. I tossed the bottle and never tried it again.

    Perhaps some specific type would be better, but I am hesitant to try it again.
    Paul A.

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