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Thread: Masso CNC controller any opinions?

  1. #61
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    If using a milling or laser machine, I would just fire up grbl on an Arduino for controlling, can't beat the price on that. One needs a computer anyway to do CAD/CAM and there is lots of software for sending files and controlling grbl through the computer. If not needing a CAD/CAM, then I would pair up Raspberry Pi and a grbl controller for a cheap, fast, small and easy to use package. But the requirements of different people dictate different means, for example the grbl can't do lathe at the moment.
    Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

  2. #62
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    Why can't grbl work on lathe? It's just a 3 axis g-code controller. Up to you what the axis do. If you are taking threading, then yes, someone needs to write a module to sync feed/spindle. I'm surprised it hasn't happen yet but believe it's mainly because most user have mills or similar. GRBL is some on the tightest code I've seen; beautiful work that will go far.

    What intrigues me about the Centroid controller is that software has conversational mode. I use Conversational Mode daily (Acu-rite 3 axis Millpwer on a BP, but conversational on my model is limited to 2.5 axis) and don't have to resort to G-code or even cad. I typically make 1 through 2-3 parts... most are done before I could have done the cad/G-code cycle. I can punch in a complex part, watch tool simulations and solve geometry (like intersection of arcs, splines etc) on screen. I never have to worry about tool widths, offsets etc.. if I want to change from say a 3/8 to 1/2 inch end mill in the middle of a job, I just change the tool type in a second. Same with tool center, left/right - I just tap the soft-key to change that. Expert g-coders aside, Conversational modes will open up the market to us lessor beings quickly.
    Last edited by lakeside53; 04-16-2017 at 10:37 AM.

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by lakeside53 View Post
    Why can't grbl work on lathe? It's just a 3 axis g-code controller. Up to you what the axis do. If you are taking threading, then yes, someone needs to write a module to sync feed/spindle. I'm surprised it hasn't happen yet but believe it's mainly because most user have mills or similar. GRBL is some on the tightest code I've seen; beautiful work that will go far.
    You are right, it could be used on a lathe by changing the code just a little for the X axis, but the main issue is like you described, no spindle/feed synch and no X-axis tied spindle speed output. I know it is in the works, but might be a long time since "everyone" has a 3-axis 'mill' (routers, printers, lasers etc). The code is truly remarkable, it really makes use of every known trick on an Arduino to get everything working fast.

    And what you said about the conversational part, I'm so used to it on a Heidenhain that I couldn't live without it. Makes it really fast and simple to start carving some (simple) parts that you only have as a draft on paper. Plus the code is easy to read english (localizations aside), unlike G code.
    Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Stevenson View Post
    I can't say a lot but Tormach did look at Siemens and the Chinese controllers but discounted them as having no control over the system. You get what they supply.
    Anyone have opinions on the Siemens 808d? Quality, customer support, user friendly?
    I'm wondering if it's a good alternative to Mach3, Masso, or the generic Chinese controllers?

  5. #65
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    It is a good proven controller but a bit aged now.
    It's biggest limitation is the basic controller is just that - basic.
    Any improvements or extras are paid add ones.
    The closest unit you have mentioned is the stand alone Chinese one which comes fully featured for the model you buy.

    By that I meant if you buy a 3 axis controller it does everything on 3 axis. If you want 4 axis then you have to buy the 4 axis model.
    .

    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.




  6. #66
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    That being said, Masso seems like a nice, standardized "black box". On the surface, it seems to keep most the things I like about Mach3. And it seems to eliminate piecing things together, trying to make softwares work together.

  7. #67
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    And that is why I would like to try Masso, Siemans, or chinese controllers.
    Opinions, anybody?

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Stevenson View Post
    Thats the planet USB board which can be bought far cheaper direct from Planet CNC.

    I have been following this as regards lathe but according to their forum some have problems with it on pitch related issues and the company is very slow to respond.

    The UCCNC 300 also looks promising but lathe isn't ready for prime time yet.
    Problem with all these is the user is still the beta tester. After having spent literally thousands of pounds buying board that never come up to scratch or do what they say and most often just lack support I have come to the conclusion I don't want to be an unpaid beta tester any more.

    With this in mind I recently bought two of these.





    Dedicated stand alone 2 axis lathe controller that mimics a Fanuc 21 system.

    This is a complete stand alone and works out the box once 240v AC is supplied to the built in power supply on the back.
    They are also available for up to 5 axis in lathe or mill version.

    You feed it a program from a USB stick and it outputs to stepper drives or servo drives, VFD and an 8 position tool turret.
    Sockets on the back also take multi-line encoder input for threading on a lathe or rigid tapping on a mill probes and pendants.

    These cost just over 400 UKP each, landed and duty's paid.
    Mine is still a work in progress as the lathe it's destined for isn't ready but the other controller has gone up to Steve Blackmore up at St, Helens, near Liverpool and been fitted to a Denford Orac lathe and is all working.

    The first thread cut was M16 x 1mm pitch [ no actual reason for that size ] but worked out perfect straight out of the box which is something none of the other software - hardware manufacturers has managed to do.



    Next thread was the same but changed from 1mm pitch to 3mm pitch and changed to triple start.



    Only done as a scratch thread to prove it but again perfect and all that was needed was some parameters needed changing on the G76 command.

    The rear of the box, [ no pics at the moment ] has about 10 DB25 sockets on it, all clearly marked to go to the various drivers, limit switches, pendant, encoder, VFD etc It also comes with very long matching cables with plugs at one end and clearly marked flying leads at the other end.

    So all you need is this box, no monitor, computer, keyboard, mouse, windows license or controller license. Manual is in English and not bad but as it becomes clearer the manual is being updated and posted on line.

    I'm an looking at one of the above stand alone control panels for a small cnc (Chinese) lathe I was give, the lathe currently has a faulty control panel on it. John how did the panels work out?

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