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Thread: long-term rust protection of bare metal

  1. #11
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    Dec 2007
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    Montvale, NJ
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    If you really have no plans for these parts for 10 years, just roll on a quick, thin coat of exterior latex paint. I would feel better stripping that and painting over the panel rather than putting oil or other rust preventative on it.

  2. #12
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    Mar 2008
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    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
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    Jim--Don't put oil or wax on the body parts. It will cause unbelievable problems when you do finally get to painting them. Spray them with a catalyzed epoxy primer. Old style laquer based primer won't stop moisture from rusting the parts but the newer catalyzed epoxy will protect them long term.---Brian
    Brian Rupnow

  3. #13
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    Thanks, fellas!

  4. #14
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    Jan 2003
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    Chilliwack, B.C.
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    Yeah, that's what I meant- epoxy catalyzed primer. ha ha- I didn't realize that ordinary primer would not be a barrier to moisture in an inside environment. I've seen cars with only primer running around for years, but never thought to check for rust formation.

    You might be better off just spray painting yourself using a combination primer/paint. Color won't matter. You'll be sanding it away later anyway, so you don't want too good of a coating- consumer grade spray paint might be just good enough.
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

  5. #15
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    Sep 2008
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    Central Kentucky
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    Epoxy primer is great stuff and the first thing I do to any body panel or repair is to spray it with epoxy primer, the stuff is expen$ive but it can't be beat for corrosion protection! A couple of tips for using this type of primer, it needs a rather rough surface to adhere properly so I scuff the bare metal with 180 grit paper and then apply two coats allowing it to become dry to touch before applying the second coat. If a finish is not applied within a day or so, this varies with brands, it will need to be scuffed with sandpaper and another coat applied before any topcoating is applied including conventional primers. If left for any length of time, certainly years, it should be topcoated with another primer such as lacquer or one of the polyester filler primers within a couple of hours, no scuffing needed if coated in that time frame. If left for weeks, never mind years, it becomes EXTREMELY hard making it very difficult to sand and causes difficulty in getting topcoats to adhere. If something like even simple lacquer primer is applied around two hours after the original application it will adhere quite well and is then easily prepped for painting even after being left for long periods of time, old uncoated epoxy primer however is a absolute nightmare to properly prep for finish painting!

  6. #16
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    Jan 2005
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    Ct
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    Boeshield, no?
    Len

  7. #17
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    Dec 2015
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    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
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    Along the idea of the paint as a long term protective layer what about regular ol' Tremclad? It would have the advantage of being easily stripped later on and it's a low cost option as far as paints go.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
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    Six years ago I used a Omni's MP series Epoxy Primer to "seal" parts of a car I am restoring. Its has been out in the weather, outside and has a little fading, no rust. This stuff works great. I use black (MP172) to seal all metal. I put filler over it and high build primer using gray. When sanding and I start seeing black I stop. If I cut though the black I re-spray the MP to reseal. Filler on metal introduces moister and it will leach to the top coat. You will also find MP is a 'harder" primer, meaning it is hard to scratch in storage.

    When you come back to working on it, scuff it with a 3M pad (make sure you get the corners) and paint. (see dry times)

    Also OMNI is a PPG cheaper paint. So far I have used a full family of PPG product over this without problems. A good paint salesmen can tell you what will work.

    Product Sheet: http://www.automotivepaintandequipme...%20Primers.pdf

    Remember a good paint job is in the prep.

    PS Metal is porous, wax and oil will have to be remove before paining! My only other offer is to vacuum sill the parts in plastic.
    Last edited by outlawspeeder; 12-18-2016 at 02:27 PM.

  9. #19
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    Sep 2007
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    North Carolina
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    Quote Originally Posted by outlawspeeder View Post
    ..................... Its has been out in the weather, outside and has a little fading, no rust. This stuff works great. ....................
    This is why it's nice when people fill in their location. "Out in the weather" isn't very impressive if you live in Phoenix.

    Steve

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    Lower SE Michigan, USA
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    You guys gave me a great idea:

    I bought one of those Harbor Freight HVLP spray rigs as recommended by Flylo, he said that he knows a fella who painted a couple of airplanes with one. I have some paints of various colors on the shelf here, so what better to practice with? At worst, I'll have to sandblast the parts when it comes time for a final paint job. That's if I live that long, at my age I want to play with the car, not spend several years with it in the shop. :-)

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