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Thread: Interesting (and awsome) cutting technology

  1. #1
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    Default Interesting (and awsome) cutting technology

    This is about machining, but with equipment and technology which is unlikely to be seen in the home shop. It relates to small scale sliding head lathes (modern-day equivalent of 'screw machines'). I thought is was fascinating technology. They are both manufacturer's promos, but are short (3+ mins.):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7HdMaJ_9Kus

    Showing LFV (low frequency vibration) turning for chip breaking plus drilling a 1mm hole 30 mm deep with through coolant.


    If you want a clearer animated explanation of LFV turning,then look at this:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2tpgc_pHRl4

    And NO, I don't sell any of this stuff, so I don't think I'm breaking the rules on here.

    Ian.
    Last edited by IanPendle; 01-05-2017 at 03:24 AM. Reason: correction

  2. #2
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    Wow! I didn't know I was so advanced. My 47 year old lathe vibrates also. The Russians were way ahead of the Japanese.
    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

  3. #3
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    Feb 2015
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    Interesting.

    So the primary advantage is less load on the cutter and workpiece via air cuts? If so, that's pretty clever.

    So how is the "vibration" induced? Through linear motion on the cutting axis? Or in the case of the spindle through some frequency control?

  4. #4
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    Hello,

    BF and VTNC,

    Sorry, I can't give definitive answers - this was something that I just stumbled across. As someone who has fought chatter all my life, I thought that the harnessing of 'reverse chatter' (so to speak - my phrase!) was interesting and rather inventive. I think that it is ultimately about chip breaking on stringy chipping materials, particularly at these sizes . On these machines, for diameter turning, you would have the option of moving the tool or the work piece axially (sliding head), but on grooving or parting off, the radial movement is the only one amenable to reciprocating motion (I think).

    Whilst the above is all amazing technology, what I found most amazing was that someone is capable of producing a 1mm drill with through coolant and a 30:1 ratio of depth to diam. That's VERY impressive!

    Ian.

  5. #5
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    I'm impressed! Any CNC machines using this this?
    Last edited by flylo; 01-05-2017 at 08:50 AM.
    You can lead people to knowledge but you can't make them think.
    "Lead, follow, or get out of the way."-Thomas Paine

  6. #6
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    I hope they have a "normal" finishing mode so your parts not all cobbled up and irregular when done.

    lets also hope their not pulsing the leads back and forth or else the ballscrews will last about 15 minutes lol

    but yeah it is interesting

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Black Forest View Post
    Wow! I didn't know I was so advanced. My 47 year old lathe vibrates also. The Russians were way ahead of the Japanese.
    I think there is a difference between controlled vibration and shake, shimmy and rattle.

    JL.............

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by A.K. Boomer View Post

    lets also hope their not pulsing the leads back and forth or else the ballscrews will last about 15 minutes lol
    I worked on a Mitsubishi plunge EDM once that used pulses to help the flushing. You couldn't see it move, but could feel it and the numbers for the Z position on the screen were a blur. Apparently when first introduced the feature worked great until ballscrews started to wear out. Mitsubishi added a routine to lift the head a few inches every couple of minutes to help oil things, which solved the problems and we never had an issue. When I last saw the '97 vintage machine a few years back it was still happily bouncing away.
    George

  9. #9
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    Isn't this a version of peck drilling? Stu

  10. #10
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    This is sort of like peck drilling to break chips and clear the hole. More sophisticated in oscillating the tool within a single revolution of the machine spindle though.

    The machines shown were sliding headstock or "Swiss" type lathes. Swiss machines usually run at very high rpm's, 5,000+. To coordinate several oscillates per part revolution is going to take quite a controller. A further complication is CNC Swiss machines may have a couple tools in the cut simultaneously.

    FYI: They're called Swiss machines because the sliding headstock type were developed to make tiny screws, etc for the Swiss watch industry.

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