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Thread: Interesting (and awsome) cutting technology

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by IanPendle View Post
    Hello,


    Whilst the above is all amazing technology, what I found most amazing was that someone is capable of producing a 1mm drill with through coolant and a 30:1 ratio of depth to diam. That's VERY impressive!

    Ian.
    That is what I found amazing. I would love to see a video on how they manufacture such a drill. Even without through coolant. I use 1mm drills sometimes and am always astounded at how robust they are drilling in steel. But how do they get a hole in one of those suckers! That is way beyond this farmer/hacks comprehension.
    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Bulliss View Post
    I worked on a Mitsubishi plunge EDM once that used pulses to help the flushing. You couldn't see it move, but could feel it and the numbers for the Z position on the screen were a blur. Apparently when first introduced the feature worked great until ballscrews started to wear out. Mitsubishi added a routine to lift the head a few inches every couple of minutes to help oil things, which solved the problems and we never had an issue. When I last saw the '97 vintage machine a few years back it was still happily bouncing away.

    Wow - that's incredible, they were false brinelling due to fretting away without lube at the contact points,,,

    picking the head up once in awhile would solve that - im just surprised the internal bearing case mounts don't also gain clearance and stuff, proof is in the pudding though if it works it works...

  3. #13
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    Default Very nice ,but about time

    Quote Originally Posted by IanPendle View Post
    This is about machining, but with equipment and technology which is unlikely to be seen in the home shop. It relates to small scale sliding head lathes (modern-day equivalent of 'screw machines'). I thought is was fascinating technology. They are both manufacturer's promos, but are short (3+ mins.):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7HdMaJ_9Kus

    Showing LFV (low frequency vibration) turning for chip breaking plus drilling a 1mm hole 30 mm deep with through coolant.


    If you want a clearer animated explanation of LFV turning,then look at this:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2tpgc_pHRl4

    And NO, I don't sell any of this stuff, so I don't think I'm breaking the rules on here.

    Ian.
    Every lathe hand hes been doing a similar thing manually since the beginning of time when cutting and drilling stringy material. I have edited programs on cnc lathes to do this ,it is a tedious and time consuming editing process. Of Course the example shown is better and much more sophisticated because the pulsing and reverse feeding seems to be syncronised wirth the spindle rotation.This seems to be an easy and no brain machine level programing straregy and it should have been done long ago. Edwin Dirnbeck
    Last edited by Edwin Dirnbeck; 01-05-2017 at 10:37 AM.

  4. #14
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    So, as I see it, the LFV (Low frequency vibration) feature is primarily for chip breaking?
    Pretty snazzy way to eliminate long stringy chips and bird nests.
    HAAS has an SSV feature (Spindle speed variation) on their lathes to eliminate chatter.
    Also pretty snazzy.
    SSV link: HAAS SSV feature

  5. #15
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    Miyano is my favorite CNC lathe manufacturer by far. From what I understand after they went bankrupt, Citizen (yes, the same company as the watch company) moved in and took over the business and combined them into one company. I program and setup Miyanos almost exclusively.

    The vibrating technology is probably just the servo oscillating the ball screw. I would think that it would be hard on ball screws over the long term.

    Regarding the control - I'm amazed at how sophisticated they are becoming. Miyano and Citizen use something they call superimposition. With one turret Miyano can thread using 2 spindles threads of 2 different pitches. Or you can thread on one spindle and turn on the other. The sub spindle follows the turret, then adds or subtracts the appropriate moves to complete the G code. It's kinda wild to see. It's super easy to program - you just program each spindle as if it was single, then just apply the code and the control does the rest.

    Here is a video starting at the time showing this:

    https://youtu.be/7hfDnxt8Jp0?t=163

  6. #16
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    Hello enginuity

    ".........I program and setup Miyanos almost exclusively....... It's super easy to program - you just program each spindle as if it was single, then just apply the code and the control does the rest....."

    I'm in awe! I think that your idea of "easy" is considerably in advance of mine. I don't think that I could sleep at night considering all the myriad collision possibilities of those multiple spindles, axies, tools etc.

    Seriously, does the LFV turning scale up to larger machines/parts' or is it limited to small parts at high revs.?

    Ian.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edwin Dirnbeck View Post
    Every lathe hand hes been doing a similar thing manually since the beginning of time when cutting and drilling stringy material.
    Yup - it's really quite easy to do on a lathe just pause once once in awhile depending on material type and stuff but the deep hole drilling cannot compete with what they are doing that's for sure,

    I wonder what power consumption is when they are in "pulse mode"? has to take quite a bit more power tossing a servo motor back and forth like that so many times a second and also the table...

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by enginuity View Post
    Miyano is my favorite CNC lathe manufacturer by far. From what I understand after they went bankrupt, Citizen (yes, the same company as the watch company) moved in and took over the business and combined them into one company. I program and setup Miyanos almost exclusively.

    The vibrating technology is probably just the servo oscillating the ball screw. I would think that it would be hard on ball screws over the long term.

    Regarding the control - I'm amazed at how sophisticated they are becoming. Miyano and Citizen use something they call superimposition. With one turret Miyano can thread using 2 spindles threads of 2 different pitches. Or you can thread on one spindle and turn on the other. The sub spindle follows the turret, then adds or subtracts the appropriate moves to complete the G code. It's kinda wild to see. It's super easy to program - you just program each spindle as if it was single, then just apply the code and the control does the rest.

    Here is a video starting at the time showing this:

    https://youtu.be/7hfDnxt8Jp0?t=163
    That's incredible. We've got a nakamura tw-20 here and I'm the only one who knows how to program and run it (nobody else wants to step up and take initiative). I really only run it as a 2 axis lathe via fingercam as I don't yet know how to program all the other fancy stuff it can do. I've learned it completely on my own time/dime as an "investment" in myself, but with my other job requirements etc I just don't have the time right now to take it farther. I'd love to get into it a bit more, but I'm petrified of crashing it because I know it would never get fixed. I do get your "easy to program" comment though, as it's the way I view how I do mill programming now. Been doing it so long that it's second nature, but it sure wasn't when I started.

    Re: coolant through tools. We've got a 1/8" (and bigger) carbide with coolant through holes, and it's awesome. 5100rpm/15ipm into 4140 no spot, no peck, and you're left with a perfect hole for a nice tight fit for a dowel on location within a thou (or better). When we got into these high performance drills it was a game changer for us. No more spot, drill, chase/bore, ream for dowels. Just pound one of these drills in and bam, done. Perfect dowel holes (took a bit of trial/error with speeds and feeds, but I pretty much have it down now with only the occasional surprise). There really is some cool tech out there in the manufacturing world now.

  9. #19
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    I would guess that the small drills with coolant holes might start as a flat bar of larger size with two holes drilled near the edges. Then it would be drawn through dies until it reaches the size needed, perhaps also twisting it into the rough helix shape. The final operation would be machining the required shapes of the cutting edges, lands, and grooves. Larger drills might have one through hole for coolant, but the small one in the video appears to have two, and the holes probably follow the twist through the thickest cross-sectional areas.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by PStechPaul View Post
    I would guess that the small drills with coolant holes might start as a flat bar of larger size with two holes drilled near the edges. Then it would be drawn through dies until it reaches the size needed, perhaps also twisting it into the rough helix shape. The final operation would be machining the required shapes of the cutting edges, lands, and grooves. Larger drills might have one through hole for coolant, but the small one in the video appears to have two, and the holes probably follow the twist through the thickest cross-sectional areas.
    These ones are powdered metal, formed with helical mandrels inside, then sintered. As far as I've been told, thats how they do most of them. I have seen a video years ago, of a blank that was twisted, forming flutes with coolant holes through. Must not have been carbide as I can't imagine carbide responding well to being twisted like that. That's about all I can remember of it though.

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