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Thread: OT, anyone want to settle an automotive spindle debate?

  1. #1
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    Default OT, anyone want to settle an automotive spindle debate?

    part in question:
    http://www.dennysdriveshaft.com/p456...lor.html#photo

    The debate is (A) whether D supports the weight, or (B) the cap screws passing through f/k support the weight.

    I'm in the A camp, because 'D' is a tight fit that requires pulling it in with the screws, which are smaller in diameter than the holes in the flange. something like 8mm bolts through 10 mm holes (WAG)

  2. #2
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    That's not even a debate. Stub "D" sockets into the spindle and bears the bulk of the weight of the truck. The bolts in effect only restrain it against lever/bending forces. That's how they were designed.

    Doc.
    Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

  3. #3
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    If you pull the bolts out will the weight dislodge the spindle? If so then the bolts are supporting some of the weight. If you removed the D feature would the spindle still function just being held on by the bolts? I think the bottom line is that they both play a part in supporting the vehicle. You will find that D is in shear and the bolts in tension. Remove either and it will fail.

    lg
    no neat sig line
    Last edited by larry_g; 01-10-2017 at 03:30 PM. Reason: add info

  4. #4
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    I am in the both camp. Two types of loads (up and down and sideways), two types of support. JR
    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

  5. #5
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    Default

    A and c support the weight with bearings installed

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by larry_g View Post
    If you pull the bolts out will the weight dislodge the spindle? If so then the bolts are supporting some of the weight. If you removed the D feature would the spindle still function just being held on by the bolts? I think the bottom line is that they both play a part in supporting the vehicle. You will find that D is in shear and the bolts in tension. Remove either and it will fail.

    lg
    no neat sig line
    I'm with Larry on this one. I think if one would examine the interface between D and the steering knuckle very carefully you would find some clearance between the two, they are not a press fit.
    Without the clamping force securing the spindle to the knuckle the assembly would fail. Normally these two surfaces clamped together would carry the load.
    In a high load impact scenario the pilot (D) would ensure little to no movement between the two. Probably why both methods are used in this critical application.
    Home,down in the valley behind the Red Angus
    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

  7. #7
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    Both

  8. #8
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    Neither. The friction between the flange and what it's bolted to is taking all the load. Once the bolts are tight you can remove the boss and not notice.
    Now when the bolts are rattling loose it's nice to have the boss otherwise you might shear off the bolts. It's very convenient for locating the spindle as well while tightening the bolts.

  9. #9
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    Yes Larry's post has nailed it, there's two types of forces going on - the supporting factors are not jack squat without each other, but both combined are rock solid...

  10. #10
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    Agreed with ikdor above. Its commonly called a clamping load here stateside.
    "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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