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Thread: OT:Any Wood Cookstoves out there

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    Missouri
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    26,205

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    The wife of one of my father-in-law's friends cooks on a woodstove (no clue what brand) and makes the very best pies and cookies. They don't seem to be the same goodness when baked in a gas oven, even though my wife makes VERY good pies.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Edmonton Alberta
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    827

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Smith View Post
    Yes, have that identical Esse Ironheart. In use for coming up ten years now although not in the summer months. Nearly every year we've had to replace the steel baffle in the firebox however last one that was supplied was substantially thicker steel and is lasting well. The fire box is not as airtight as it might be which is what results in overhot burning and sagging firebox baffles.
    One thing that amused me was the false door with the logo "The Ironheart" is actually cast aluminium!!
    We use ours only winter as well,have had no issues with baffles so far maybe this one has thicker baffle.We use ours for heat and mostly the oven which bakes very consistent.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Kirkland, Washington
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    1,755

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    I spent Christmas in a Forest Service cabin near Crystal Mountain in central Washington State. It had a wood
    cookstove. A friend and I managed to turn out a turkey dinner with all the trimmings even though we'd never
    used one before. I treasure the memory. Oh - the turkey was great, too!

    metalmagpie

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    West Sussex UK
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    223

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    @TTT, I love the oven for cooking with, as it gets very hot I find it's great for roasting meat especially venison which we seem to live on. My wife however only does baking and she will tend to use the electric oven as she prefers it's predictability.

    @metalmagpie That sounds great. Was it Jack Kerouac who wrote about a winter fire spotting up a mountain in Washington State? I remember it was a vivid book.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Kendal, On
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    798

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    Helped a buddy get a Findley oval out of his basement a couple years ago and was offered it for free, but didn't really want it at the time. Really wish I would have taken it now, as it was in pretty decent shape and would have been great in the shack out back. My Great Uncle used to have one in his house and they cooked on it all the time. Also have an Aunt and Uncle who have one in their cottage and also use it all time for heat and cooking.

    I heat my house with a woodstoves (one upstairs, one down) and cook on them all the time. I love waking up to the power out in the winter and cooking breakfast and making coffee on it. Also roast hot dogs on sticks and make smores with the kids once in a while. Going to do that tonight now that I think about it. They think it's a blast.

  6. #16

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    Look up lehman's hardwares website.
    Last edited by micrometer50; 01-12-2017 at 03:44 PM. Reason: misspelled

  7. #17
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    north bay area
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    4,835

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    My wife and i and 4 kids lived off grid for about 30 years with a great old cookstove. Kids all grew up and learned how to cook and bake with that stove. Can't beat a good cookstove with dry hardwood, Cooks your'e food, heats the home, heats hot water, drys clothes etc, all on the same wood.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    SW Michigan
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    And I used free slabwood when I had the sawmill & always had plenty of free wood.
    You can lead people to knowledge but you can't make them think.
    "Lead, follow, or get out of the way."-Thomas Paine

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    1,697

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    Flylo, is that 1929 GE frige a sulfur dioxide unit? Seems to me that freon 12 was not used much until after WW2.
    Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    SW Michigan
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    I may be wrong but I thought it was ammonia as I've had gas fridges that were ammonia & if they sat & wouldn't chill we'd just turn them upside down for a couple days & they always worked. The GE may be different I don't know.
    You can lead people to knowledge but you can't make them think.
    "Lead, follow, or get out of the way."-Thomas Paine

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