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Thread: OT- Snow Blower

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Virginia
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    1,065

    Default OT- Snow Blower

    I was given a snow blower two years ago, older fellow felt he couldn't depend on it cause he had to run it on half choke. So he bought one new, and gave it to me. Looks standard, Tecumseh motor, 6 speeds, etc. I took the carb apart, shot some carb cleaner through it all and it runs fairly good. I thought I would get a rebuild kit for the carb, started looking around, and Amazon has NEW carbs for under 16 bucks! No brainer there.

    But what else should I be looking at to make sure it keeps going? Never had one before this, and I could kick myself for not! Things usually break when it's not the best time.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Johnstown, Ohio
    Posts
    121

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    Because gasoline is now crap I would make sure to put fuel stabilizer in the gas you use for it.
    Other than that, it's a simple machine with a lawn mower engine. keep it greased and maintained and it will serve you well.

  3. #3

    Default

    Try to use pure gasoline without ethanol and stabilizer. The alcohol causes corrosion with the pot metal

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Medford MA
    Posts
    503

    Default

    There usually are some drive belts to replace periodically

    Get the manual for the machine and see what it says

    Get extra shear bolts for the auger. Also make sure that you have toe right sized wrenches, etc handy to replace a bolt when one goes


    Maybe replace the spark plug

    If there's a fuel filter, replace it?
    Usually there is no air filter o. These machines

    Also, prior to each use, I spray a lot of silicone lube on the business end of the machine to help the snow flow a bit easier.

    Check tire inflation

    And of course the usual stuff for any machine (are bolts tight, etc, etc)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Posts
    7,834

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    Run it out of fuel & use non ethanol available a many airports called MOGAS or many stations as off road gas. You can test but putting water in a jar marking a line at the water level add gas shake then let set & if the water line didn't move means no ethanol as it absorbs water & will raise the water level if ethanol is present.
    You can lead people to knowledge but you can't make them think.
    "Lead, follow, or get out of the way."-Thomas Paine

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Virginia
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    1,065

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    I am a faithful run it out of gas guy, on everything that doesn't get used often. And I use non-ethanol gas in all my two strokes and this blower. My riding mower gets regular gas, cause I use it year round, pulling a trailer hauling wood, feed, etc.

    I was looking for the belt, shear pins, type thing. It's an old model, I'll try to look up a manual.

    Oh, and I'm going to fashion some kind of air filter. Can't believe it has none.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Dracut, Massachusetts
    Posts
    1,571

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    Around here you can't buy gas without ethanol, outside of going to an airport. That is just enough of a hassle to keep me from doing so.

    During the winter when I run my snow blower I use fresh regular gas with some stabilizer/treatments stuff added. When it looks like I'm not going to need it for a while I have started using the canned on the shelf stuff like this:

    https://shop.briggsandstratton.com/us/en/canned-fuel

    though I get a different brand that is available at the local NAPA store. It's a bit pricey to run the thing on all the time. When I am done using the machine for a while, I run the regular fuel out of it and then put some of this stuff in the tank and run the engine for a few minutes to get the carburetor filled. Seems to work fine and when I next need the machine I just add my regular gas to the tank and go. I find first time start ups are a lot easier and no more gummed up carbs. Do the same on my generator.

    I use the premix version of this stuff for my chainsaws, huge improvement as I use them pretty intermittently. I find it worth the extra cost for them to just run them on this stuff, as I don't do a tremendous amount of cutting most of the time.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    144

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    I haven't had any problem with gas being left in small engines over a period of up to a year. I have been using Startron treatment and I put a little more in than the min. recommended. And I usually don't get around to running it out of gas because I am never sure of the last time I will be using the mower, chain saw, log spliter, tractor, etc. Then I realize I won't be using it again but never get around to getting the gas out and starting it to run out. Maybe I have just been lucky, but so far so good.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    148

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    Snow blowers usually do not have air filters, but instead they have a shroud that helps keep them warm and the blowing snow out. I would put the shroud back on before trying to do a air filter. Check your belts as they can age and then break when you really need them. Remove your rake shear pins and make sure your rakes are free. Leave your shear pins out if they are stuck, you probably won't be able to free them easily. Stuck rakes are the main reason the front gearbox gets broken. Consider shimming your blower wheel if it doesn't throw snow well. The kits use a reinforced rubber material and you attach it to the blower wheel to reduce the clearance to the housing. Especially helpful if you often have wet snow or slush. Mike

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
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    2,504

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    Quote Originally Posted by tincture500 View Post
    Try to use pure gasoline without ethanol and stabilizer. The alcohol causes corrosion with the pot metal
    I don't know about corrosion but this idea of using gas without any ethanol has been related to me more than once in the past. At least two folks with a lot of small engine background from their work also said that the ethanol led to the gas going stale in the carb sooner and promoting earlier "grungifying" of the carb to form the green sludge. Now that green DOES suggest copper from the brass parts being leached out so it stains the old gas and when it evaporates fully the remaining oily sludge. That used to happen with the old "pure" gasoline though. But it did tend to take longer for it to occur.

    I've personally got three engines here now that have issues and need rebuild kits (or new carbs). These are all seasonal use engines and all used fuel stabilizer. Based on the info about possible ethanol issues I'll be going with the higher grade gas from here on out to avoid any ethanol and see if that brings me back to the old days where these seasonal engines did not cause this sort of issue.

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