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Thread: OT- Snow Blower

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    Independent principality of Sinquefieldia (formerly Missouri in the USA)
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    24,048

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    Willy is right.... try to melt any of it and it will plug up fast. Some seem to plug up with wet snow.

    Basically why I bagged it and use a shovel. Slower, but when the machine is not cooperating, it may be faster, and not much more work than fighting with the machine.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    West Michigan
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    112

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    As has been said don't waste your time trying to configure an air filter. Snow blowers & snowmobiles (older ones anyways) don't need them and performance can actually be hindered. Actually, never seen an outboard with one either.

    Another thing to look at is the scraper blade and skid shoes. Check for wear and adjust according to the type of substrate you will be clearing (gravel vs pavement).

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
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    261

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    Quote Originally Posted by Robg View Post
    Hey Machine - I have the exact same snow blower! I bought it used 20 years ago when I moved to the house I'm in now which has a driveway long enough to park about 6 or 7 cars bumper to bumper and still be able to access the detached garage at the end. Anyway, I had problems with it after a while where I had to keep the choke on half way or it wouldn't run right, always figured I'd look at the problem later and then winter was over and didn't get to it. The primer bulb quit working so I got a new one and when I went to put it on, I found the hose was cracked at the bulb connection. So, nice vacuum leak & the need to run rich with the choke. Fixed that and now all is well. I also don't have much luck with it when spring approaches and the snow gets heavy & wet. So I don't use it then but soon it's spring anyway.
    Hey that's cool you had one too. I mean it was a neat little snowblower. I really liked the tracks because I like anything with tracks. And I thought about keeping it and putting a much bigger engine on it. I thought it would be a hoot to squeeze a 10hp Honda motor on it. I'm sure it would have shot snow into the next county if I did that. But I thought it would probably make short work of the little gearbox it had between the impeller and auger, which obviously was only designed for the half the power. Being up in Canada I suspect it works ok for you most of the year. But heck up in the great white north I'd think you'd want one like this...


  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Virginia
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    1,037

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    Well I've never had a carb ice up. I run my lawn mower pulling a trailer to move split wood around, run my wood splitter and have run my generator all in the same kind of weather, all of them has an air cleaner.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
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    261

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    Quote Originally Posted by Willy View Post
    Heck I've tried and if anything it made the chute more prone to plugging. However it would thaw out quick when the snowblower was not actively being used. But go ahead and devise a system and let us know how it works. I think there is a reason you don't see this approach being used successfully in commercial applications. Personally I think a non-stick coating would be a more effective solution to prevent ice from bonding to the chute.
    If you already tried it, I'll take your word for it when you say it doesn't work. I think I did see where there are certain snowblowers that do have that feature though (if memory serves). I never did bother trying as I could see multiple easier and simpler solutions. Either get a much more powerful snowblower or simply use a blade for my tractor. I decided to get a plow for my tractor and it's been perfect. Plus the plow doesn't have an engine I have to fuss over and change the oil, clean the carb, worry about stale gas/ethanol etc. And I can leave it outside all the time and it doesn't take up any valuable storage space in my shed or garage.

    As always, YMMV.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    516

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    That's why I leave the shovel outside. Cold metal means the snow is less likely to stick. Maybe I should leave the blower outside for a few minutes before I start it.

    There's a non-stick spray that works pretty well. My blower's a little underpowered, especially in the wet heavy stuff, but the non-stick spray helps quite a bit. I think it's called snow and ice repellent.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Preston, Connecticut
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    626

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    I saw this neat turbo charged snow blower at the Cranberry Flywheelers show in 2013. Maybe this would do the job?



    Errol Groff
    Errol Groff

    New England Model Engineering Society
    http://neme-s.org/

    YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/GroffErrol?feature=mhee

  8. #28
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    Nov 2003
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    Virginia
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    That will never work, it has an air cleaner.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Upstate NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by Willy View Post
    Using exhaust heat to warm the chute is akin to pissing on hell as there simply is not enough heat available to warm the chute enough considering the amount of cold material passing thru the chute.
    If that worked, every manufacturer would do it. On the large (48 inch and up) tractor-driven snowblowers we sell, one company used to install replaceable Delrin sheets in the chute area- those machines never clogged.

    I live in the snow belt and a common hack when moving wet snow is to spray the chute with wax or even cooking spray to keep the snow from sticking. It works well, but you will have to reapply cooking spray fairly often.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Kendal, On
    Posts
    578

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    Crazy carpet is a near perfect material to line the chute with. Easy to cut, and pop rivet on. Cheap enough to replace on a yearly basis if you blow a gravel driveway. Use banding strap as a "washer" on the other side to add some strength along the edges.

    I bought one of those china carbs for my 8hp Tecumseh, but have yet to finish putting it back together. Came down with the flu over the weekend, and only got out of bed to go hold down the couch. We'll see how it works this week if I get a chance to go play with it.

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