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Thread: How not to store quenching oil.

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Central Texas
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    I have 5 gallons of Texaco Quenchtex A in an old galvanized milk can. Works great because I can flip the lid over if there is a flash and immediately douse the flames. I bought it about 30 years ago and still good as new.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Long Island
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    1,879

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    Quote Originally Posted by Willy View Post
    Anyone here that won't admit to at one point in time using a styrofoam cup for gasoline is a liar.
    Never tried that. When I was 15 I tried etching my first circuit board. I placed the circuit board and ferric chloride in an aluminum pie pan. After
    a minute or two I decided there was way too much fizzing going on in the pan. I picked up the pan, ran down the stairs, through the kitchen
    past my surprised mother, and out the back door. The bottom fell out of the pan just as I got to the driveway.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Stevens Point, WI
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    6,589

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    Putting gas in a plastic cup on top of a fire (log) and waiting was a favorite past time.
    Andy

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Kansas City area
    Posts
    4,987

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    I have 5 gallons of quenching oil in an aluminum turkey fryer pot with a stainless wire basket. It has a flat lid that is on most of the time to keep dirt out. Picked it up at a yard sale for $20 with burner. I use the burner to melt and alloy lead.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
    Posts
    2,489

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    Quote Originally Posted by RichR View Post
    Never tried that. When I was 15 I tried etching my first circuit board. I placed the circuit board and ferric chloride in an aluminum pie pan. After
    a minute or two I decided there was way too much fizzing going on in the pan. I picked up the pan, ran down the stairs, through the kitchen
    past my surprised mother, and out the back door. The bottom fell out of the pan just as I got to the driveway.
    Nice catch! ! ! !

    I worked at a place that made marine SSB radios for a couple of years back in my youth. My main job was the circuit board shop. Yeah, Ferric Chloride and aluminium REALLY do not like each other....

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    8,787

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    Number one lesson on safe containers see the series ( breaking bad) that is some education to be had. Alistair
    Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Virginia, DC suburbs
    Posts
    1,741

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    Quote Originally Posted by RichR View Post
    Never tried that. When I was 15 I tried etching my first circuit board. I placed the circuit board and ferric chloride in an aluminum pie pan. After
    a minute or two I decided there was way too much fizzing going on in the pan. I picked up the pan, ran down the stairs, through the kitchen
    past my surprised mother, and out the back door. The bottom fell out of the pan just as I got to the driveway.
    Second that - excellent save.

    Re: quenching - While in Taipei, Taiwan years ago, I visited "Machine Shop Alley". It's a part of the city that seems to contain all the small machine shops. There were many shapers in operation, to my surprise, and dozens of shops specializing in one thing or another. One old wiry guy was working in a little shack that would probably have fit in the bed of a full-size pickup truck. He was making the tool bits for those pneumatic hammers used to bust up sidewalks. The guy must have been in his 70's, but he worked quickly and had obviously been doing it for a long time. Using tongs, he'd stick a blank in a blower-fed fireplace, then remove one that had been soaking there. Then he'd pivot over to a motor-driven hammer, step on a pedal, and whack the red hot blank into the desired shape. Lastly, he'd quench the part in a 5 gallon bucket of water, then throw the result in a pile of finished bits. What caught my attention was when he lit a cigarette from one of the bits after removing it from the water.
    -M

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Dracut, Massachusetts
    Posts
    1,568

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    Quote Originally Posted by BCRider View Post
    Not worth trying to clean them out when I can by "virgin" cans for a buck each. The big box outlets may not have them but the "proper" paint stores stock them in droves.
    Ha! It never occurred to me to try buying a new can. I had a couple that Had latex paint in them that we had gone through in one use. So they were clean enough that I just sprayed them out with a hose, which got it plenty clean for my purposes. If I ever need replacements I'll hit up the paint store. Sometimes great ideas are the obvious ones.

    Thanks!


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