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Thread: OT- Help me understand GFIC in a garage

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichR View Post
    I know GFIs have been a requirement for a long time. I'm not aware of any requirement to feed an entire panel from a single GFI.
    Correct, my reply could have been worded better. You don't have to have all outlets on one, but as that is the cheapest option... A better option is RCBOs where you get the RCD (GFI) and breaker in one unit. Each circuit then gets its own RCD/GFI.

  2. #22
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    In response to the OP, does not even take water on the floor of your garage, even just bare damp concrete is enough of a conductor to be of concern...

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinstripe View Post
    Correct, my reply could have been worded better. You don't have to have all outlets on one, but as that is the cheapest option... A better option is RCBOs where you get the RCD (GFI) and breaker in one unit. Each circuit then gets its own RCD/GFI.
    Actually, the better option is for each outlet have its OWN GFCI. That avoids having a problem shut down the entire circuit, which leaves you wondering where the problem is. With a GFCI at each outlet, the problem is obvious. And, since GFCIs are not immortal, you never have the entire circuit dead if the GFCI shoots craps.

    Individual GFCIs are not in total much more expensive than the expensive breaker/GFCI unit. So the cost penalty is small, unless you have an awful lot of outlets on the circuit.
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  4. #24
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    My new shop has a GFCI breaker for the ground floor 120V outlets. The 230V outlets don't need protection (per the regs) even if the risk seems at least the same as the 120v outlets. The 2nd story has a wooden floor and does not need GFCI, nor did the lights. I did run everything in conduit (EMT).

    Mike

  5. #25
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    Don't try to run any 120v vfd on a gfci... they won't.

  6. #26
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    Most all my cords are 10 ga with GFIs which add protection. I wouldn't do Main or any GFI breakers. Why don't 240v use GFIs? Because they don't have a ground & neutral?
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  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axkiker View Post
    So can someone help me understand why GFIC is required in a garage. I always thought GFIC was only used around water being I always saw them used in circuits in the bathroom / kitchen. What is the deal with requiring them in a garage ?
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  8. #28
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    Q's for those here that I see are more familiar with NEC than I am.
    Q1:
    My workshop here in Michigan is a room off the detached garage, built ( with 120V electricity) in 1951.
    I have replaced the outlets with the polarized type, and checked the grounds.
    I have added an isolator/ 10 Amp TD fuse unit to the outlets for lathe, table saw etc.

    It does not presently have GFCI.
    It is supplied via underground cable from a 20 Amp 10 KA 1 pole circuit breaker in the Couse Hinds panel in the house.
    >>> Does this detached room with original wiring as updated, need GFCI to comply with NEC?

    Q2:
    My electronics bench is in the basement and is powered with 120 V
    presently from an outlet connected to the original K&T ( knob and tube wiring screwed to the house wooden frame)
    from 1926, no proper ground.
    I have vintage test gear and i like to play around with small electronics, and also power electronics.
    To make all this safer just for me in my retirement,... and I am not really looking to GFCI for this,
    I am thinking to purchase for my bench outlets, a Hammond 171F.
    This is a 115:115V 500 VA isolation transformer with tail plug and receptacle. (C UL & UL listed (File #E211544))
    I would like to get an electrician in to install this properly, fed from the panel, to power an outlet strip above the workbench.

    >>>> Will the electrician be able to install this in compliance with the NEC?

    Thanks

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by flylo View Post
    Most all my cords are 10 ga with GFIs which add protection. I wouldn't do Main or any GFI breakers. Why don't 240v use GFIs? Because they don't have a ground & neutral?
    Because it hasn't been added to the NEC yet. The cast majority of residential is 120v; 240v is usually for dedicated appliances. They are much more concerned with you running extension cords outside from outlets.

    240 still has a ground and you have 120 to ground.
    Last edited by lakeside53; 03-20-2017 at 08:53 PM.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by wombat2go View Post
    Q's for those here that I see are more familiar with NEC than I am.
    Q1:
    My workshop here in Michigan is a room off the detached garage, built ( with 120V electricity) in 1951.
    I have replaced the outlets with the polarized type, and checked the grounds.
    I have added an isolator/ 10 Amp TD fuse unit to the outlets for lathe, table saw etc.

    It does not presently have GFCI.
    It is supplied via underground cable from a 20 Amp 10 KA 1 pole circuit breaker in the Couse Hinds panel in the house.
    >>> Does this detached room with original wiring as updated, need GFCI to comply with NEC?

    Q2:
    My electronics bench is in the basement and is powered with 120 V
    presently from an outlet connected to the original K&T ( knob and tube wiring screwed to the house wooden frame)
    from 1926, no proper ground.
    I have vintage test gear and i like to play around with small electronics, and also power electronics.
    To make all this safer just for me in my retirement,... and I am not really looking to GFCI for this,
    I am thinking to purchase for my bench outlets, a Hammond 171F.
    This is a 115:115V 500 VA isolation transformer with tail plug and receptacle. (C UL & UL listed (File #E211544))
    I would like to get an electrician in to install this properly, fed from the panel, to power an outlet strip above the workbench.

    >>>> Will the electrician be able to install this in compliance with the NEC?

    Thanks
    If it's detached.. today it needs its own ground rod AND a grounded conductor between the panels. But.. unless you modify it you are "grandfathered" to the code at time of install. Doesn't mean it's a good idea though!


    Yes, any competent electrician can install this" to code". Remember.. to comply with NEC code you to have to have an inspection, so the AHJ (inspector) has the last word. None of this is difficult.
    Last edited by lakeside53; 03-20-2017 at 08:54 PM.

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