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Thread: OT: New battery technology: fiberglass matrix + metallic sodium

  1. #1
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    Default OT: New battery technology: fiberglass matrix + metallic sodium


  2. #2
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    Just when we think that viable battery tech had reached it's limits, they do it again.

    But as I understand it, they are using metallic sodium, and isn't that explosive when exposed to water?
    Measure twice. Cut once. Weld. Repeat.
    ( Welding solves many problems.)

  3. #3
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    Guess It must be ready for production, Professor Good enough

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    Not sure how safe sodium is..... not that lithium is nice either

    You need to keep metallic sodium under oil, because it reacts with water. toss a chunk into water, and it will burn.

    I suppose that is bound to be the case. To get more energy density you need very reactive materials.

    somewhat reputable
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ODf_sPexS2Q

    Family style experiment, with a bigger chunk
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NTFBXJ3Zd_4

    Not recommended to let the vehicle sink in water, I suppose.

    Lithium in water
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vRKK6pliejs
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  5. #5
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    If the cells used water as a basis for an electrolyte and if there were any metallic sodium that would be a real stumbling block. But further down in the link info it does state that there's no electrolyte at all in the "classic" sense. Instead it sounds like they are using some form of semiconductor glass as a separator and solid electrolyte. So no water and no danger.

    Mind you how this will play out in real life with water being so common and damage due to "hold my beer and watch this" moments being so common in these days of no common sense remains to be seen.....

  6. #6
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    Regarding the safety of a sodium-based battery, I don't have free access to the Goodenough research paper, but found another discussing sodium-based liquid anode batteries:

    "Another noteworthy property of this liquid anode is the high degree of safety. It is well known that Na metal reacts drastically with water, posing a serious safety hazard. Here we checked the reaction of Na-BP-DME liquid anode by adding water drop by drop into the Na-BP-DME solution. Interestingly, the reaction is much milder than that of Na metal and no fire was observed during the whole process (Supplementary Fig. 10a and Supplementary Videos 3 and 4). "



    http://www.nature.com/articles/ncomm...and-technology

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    Sometime back in the early 70's, copper was very expensive, making any kind of power cable also expensive. My employer's plant site used a lot of very large power cable, up to 1250 MCM. A local electrical supplier's rep. called on my elec. engr. dept. with a cable salesman in tow. He was offering conventional plastic insulated power cable but with a cheaper sodium conductor instead of copper. We were incredulous at first and then couldn't hold back our laughter. Neither one of them seemed to be aware that water and sodium reacted violently. We never heard from that salesman again.

    RWO

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by RWO View Post
    Sometime back in the early 70's, copper was very expensive, making any kind of power cable also expensive. My employer's plant site used a lot of very large power cable, up to 1250 MCM. A local electrical supplier's rep. called on my elec. engr. dept. with a cable salesman in tow. He was offering conventional plastic insulated power cable but with a cheaper sodium conductor instead of copper. We were incredulous at first and then couldn't hold back our laughter. Neither one of them seemed to be aware that water and sodium reacted violently. We never heard from that salesman again.

    RWO
    I have read about natrium(sodium) based power cables from some book but I tought that they have never been in actual use.

    Natrium based submarine cables would be very interesting. Integrated fault-finding indicator.

  9. #9
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    I dont see how a "glass" an be called an electrolyte. What is the definition of "electrolyte" ?? Look it up .
    ...lew...

  10. #10
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    If you loosen the definition it does not have to be liquid or gel. It can be a glass doped with the chemical??? Or the metallic threads of sodium could be embedded in the glass??? or something.

    It's out of my field of knowledge. I use batteries, I don't design them.
    Measure twice. Cut once. Weld. Repeat.
    ( Welding solves many problems.)

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