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Thread: OT - Most realistic Model Railroad craftsmanship I have ever seen

  1. #31
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    I stumbled across this link in my computer's bookmarks this morning and remembered that I had posted it here some time ago. I thought I would give it a "bump" in the forum for new members who hadn't seen it and those who had but might like another look.

    This layout ought to be in a national museum. It is, inch for inch, probably the finest model railroad layout on earth with regard to period detail and customized craftsmanship.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Puckdropper View Post
    I'd say the hobby is not dying but instead is actually growing. We're embracing new technology with DCC and our local club now has 5 full-time members (that's not family members) under 18.
    i have a soft spot for the hobby, but I can't do everything (or even 1/10 of what i'm trying to do it seems).

    The creator of the that railroad was able to do so in part because of a heck of lot of talent, but also because it was sort of his full time gig. He is or was (not sure) the proprietor of Fine Scale Miniatures (FSM) one the preeminent model build kit companies. The kits he came out with, maybe 100's, were beautiful; great designs, quality wood and the signature bit was tons of very well made lost wax castings. The genre is sort of fantasy clutter, and no one has done it better than him. The thing they did that I didn't like was that the kits were all limited edition. I know why someone decides to market that way, but for me as a buyer, it turned me away (the psych says I want it all, but I can't have, so the heck with it i'll look elsewhere)

    I remember at 14 with a summer job in a warehouse at Yonge and Davisville (now high rises) hurrying over at lunch to George's Trains on Mount pleasant to buy the latest FSM kit, with my meager salary, what fun (family business, pay was well under $1/h). That was back when a hobby store had huge sections cut basswood and floquil paints and practitioners made stuff (or tried to) as nice as what George S. had done by kit or scratch. Nowadays, when the hobby is portrayed it seems more about a bunch of plastic crap kits on a green piece of plywood and a clown with an engineers cap. Anyway, girls and cars eclipsed model trains, and when I returned to hobbies, high school machine shop was fresher in the memory.
    Last edited by Mcgyver; 01-09-2019 at 10:11 AM.
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  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by DATo View Post
    I stumbled across this link in my computer's bookmarks this morning and remembered that I had posted it here some time ago. I thought I would give it a "bump" in the forum for new members who hadn't seen it and those who had but might like another look.

    This layout ought to be in a national museum. It is, inch for inch, probably the finest model railroad layout on earth with regard to period detail and customized craftsmanship.
    Yeah, but the video is just as bad as it was back then. Just as youth is wasted on the young, 4K is wasted on the inept.

    What bothers me is how everyone thinks "old times" needs to look old. It's old NOW but it wasn't old then. It happens in the movies too; Especially western movies in the depiction of the towns.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by CCWKen View Post
    What bothers me is how everyone thinks "old times" needs to look old.
    his style isn't exact recreation, its a bit whimsical. Personally, I really like it. imo the goal isn't a perfect model for the lives of miniature people, its to be entertaining and fun to make and look it. Its a bit like how a painting can really grab you, more than a exact photograph....artist interpretation and all that. of course there won't be universal agreement on that which is why we have different styles of MR's and art (probably not a stretch to compare it to, if not call it art)
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  5. #35
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    I suppose you're right. Artistic license is as rampant as participation trophies.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by CCWKen View Post
    Yeah, but the video is just as bad as it was back then. Just as youth is wasted on the young, 4K is wasted on the inept.

    What bothers me is how everyone thinks "old times" needs to look old. It's old NOW but it wasn't old then. It happens in the movies too; Especially western movies in the depiction of the towns.
    Are you referring to the extensive weathering everything is sometimes given, buildings, rolling stock, etc.? At some time it was brand new, you'd think railroads would protect their investment with fresh paint once in a while.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by CCWKen View Post
    I suppose you're right. Artistic license is as rampant as participation trophies.
    absolutely, a visit to a modern gallery ought to convince one of that. Then again I had one artist explain if you thinking about it, it worked.
    .

  8. #38
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    You would think that farmers would too. But they don't. Not a single drop of paint is ever applied to a barn after it is a single day old. And they just rot.



    Quote Originally Posted by reggie_obe View Post
    Are you referring to the extensive weathering everything is sometimes given, buildings, rolling stock, etc.? At some time it was brand new, you'd think railroads would protect their investment with fresh paint once in a while.
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    You would think that farmers would too. But they don't. Not a single drop of paint is ever applied to a barn after it is a single day old. And they just rot.
    True story.

    "preventative maintenance" only happens if it involves a grease gun. Anything else is just reactive maintenance, and it get's done in the cheapest, most hokey way possible. lol

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    You would think that farmers would too. But they don't. Not a single drop of paint is ever applied to a barn after it is a single day old. And they just rot.
    Actually they don't. 150 year old barns in perfect shape are very common. Barns get into trouble if you don't have animals in them (warmth and the foundation) and don't keep spraying the roof so it doesn't rust.

    Some might say I grew up in one, but really it was just in farm country, not the barn.
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