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Thread: OT - Most realistic Model Railroad craftsmanship I have ever seen

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    You would think that farmers would too. But they don't. Not a single drop of paint is ever applied to a barn after it is a single day old. And they just rot.
    My BIL is a farmer. The buildings and grain bins are on a 2 year rotating schedule. And let me tell you, it's a chore. It takes about a week for two guys with airless sprayers to cover everything (including themselves) in aluminum paint. Not sure what kind of half-assed farmers you have out in Texas but the farmers I know take good care of their barns, buildings, and equipment. It's a point of pride. All equipment gets washed after it comes out of the field and before it goes into the field. Barns and grain bins are sprayed, foundations sealed with tar, roofs checked for leaks, etc. on a regular schedule.

  2. #42
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    I wasn't talking only about Texas. I have traveled between here and Iowa many, many times. Rotting barns all along the route. Some of the ones I saw in Jefferson County, Iowa and the surrounding counties were only standing by a miracle. I actually saw several collapse. Well, I wasn't there at the time, but they were up one week and on the ground the next. And these were ACTIVE farms that were growing corn by the ton. The farmers just put up new ones when the old ones collapsed. No pride there. I have seen similar sights across the South and at least partially up the East coast. I have wondered if there was an insurance angle. I'm sure the high humidity doesn't help.

    I am sure that Texas has it's share. But then, I would bet that all the other states do too.

    I have to be fair. Hats off to your BIL!



    Quote Originally Posted by Fasttrack View Post
    My BIL is a farmer. The buildings and grain bins are on a 2 year rotating schedule. And let me tell you, it's a chore. It takes about a week for two guys with airless sprayers to cover everything (including themselves) in aluminum paint. Not sure what kind of half-assed farmers you have out in Texas but the farmers I know take good care of their barns, buildings, and equipment. It's a point of pride. All equipment gets washed after it comes out of the field and before it goes into the field. Barns and grain bins are sprayed, foundations sealed with tar, roofs checked for leaks, etc. on a regular schedule.
    Paul A.

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  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    You would think that farmers would too. But they don't. Not a single drop of paint is ever applied to a barn after it is a single day old. And they just rot.
    You've lived near Houston too long. They don't wash or paint anything over there. I can smell Houston when I'm within 50 miles of it.

    Who said anything about farmers/barns anyway? We were talking about the diorama in the video.

  4. #44
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    Folks were not painting stuff that much during the depression. Mu grandfather was an independent paint supplier, and he went broke then, not enough sales.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  5. #45
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    I really enjoyed and was impressed by the video. As a youngster, we always had a "Christmas Garden" with electric trains and various buildings and scenery. My German grandfather would make houses out of cardboard with cellophane windows and lights inside, and he had a waterwheel in a sink in the basement, connected to a system of belts and pulleys that went through holes in the floor to power some of the animated displays, like a lumberjack sawing a log, or a carousel, Ferris wheel, etc. I wish I had some of those items, or even pictures of them. He died in 1959 when I was just 10 years old.

    I got my first train set around 1956, a Fleischmann set my uncle brought back from Germany. I still have it.







    The last time I put together a train layout was probably when I was in High School, 1963-1966. Here is a track plan for that, which barely fit on a 4' x 6' platform:


    I've been wanting to set up some sort of layout to run my trains again, but it just seems like it would take a huge investment in time that I no longer have. I guess I had a lot more energy 50+ years ago, and my only responsibilities were school. Also, I don't have a good place to set up. I have thought about running track on shelves and through walls, or maybe have a platform that can be hung from the ceiling and lowered down to operate.

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    The farmers just put up new ones when the old ones collapsed. No pride there. I have seen similar sights across the South and at least partially up the East coast. I have wondered if there was an insurance angle.
    Bet there was. Around 20 years ago I'd visit a friend's home in the hills of Oakland CA - very much an upscale neighborhood, nice house, decent sized front and back lawns, and a rickety, half-collapsed garage in the back.

    I once asked him when he was going to tear it down and build something that was safe to park in. He responded that he wasn't - he'd wait for it to fall down, probably in a windstorm, and let the insurance pay for the new garage. And that's what happened a few years later. I bet he saved $10K in the deal.

    -js
    There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by PStechPaul View Post
    The last time I put together a train layout was probably when I was in High School, 1963-1966. Here is a track plan for that, which barely fit on a 4' x 6' platform:


    I've been wanting to set up some sort of layout to run my trains again, but it just seems like it would take a huge investment in time that I no longer have. I guess I had a lot more energy 50+ years ago, and my only responsibilities were school. Also, I don't have a good place to set up. I have thought about running track on shelves and through walls, or maybe have a platform that can be hung from the ceiling and lowered down to operate.
    My father had a simple "loop" on a 4x8' sheet of plywood painted green (IIRC). I remember playing with it in our crawl space. He also had stacks and stacks of "Popular Mechanics" magazines so I have a fond memory of playing with the train set and looking through Popular Mechanics magazines. Then later when I had our first kid, I built my first track (See the reflection of our hobbies thread). I used Anyrail software (https://www.anyrail.com/en) to help layout the track using standard track pieces. I'd say just laying out the track in a virtual environment is almost as exciting as the real deal so I'd suggest downloading the trial and put your design above inside of it. It shouldn't take too long, and I bet it will bring back plenty of great memories.
    Work hard play hard

  8. #48
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    I never did see the "hanged man", nor did I quite get the allusion to the depression and hangings. Some possible meanings are probably not too cool....
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Tiers View Post
    I never did see the "hanged man", nor did I quite get the allusion to the depression and hangings. Some possible meanings are probably not too cool....
    Spoiler alert, don't read any further if you want to find it yourself:

    at about 8:46 below the trestle.

    I think the reference to it being the depression speaks to the hopelessness people had and that some were in desperate enough situations to take their own lives.

  10. #50
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    Do any of your train layouts have humps in them. A hump is a pimple of a hill (a hump) that a shifter engine
    pushes a draft of cars up and over and as each car is going over the top, it goes from being pushed to trying to run
    away down the hill. As that happens a trainman pulls the cut lever allowing the car to take off down the hill. In a
    tower you have a humpmaster (some guy) controlling all the switches steering the car onto whatever track he wants.

    This is the way you take a bunch of cars designated for different destinations and put them in the right place.
    John Titor, when are you.

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