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Thread: OT - Most realistic Model Railroad craftsmanship I have ever seen

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeLee View Post
    That was by far the most realistic model railroad I've ever seen. Where do you even buy all that stuff??? I've been in some model and hobby shops before but never have I seen anything with such detail. The cars being weathered and the buildings. A bit congested though.
    Love the illuminated Cracker Jack sign !!

    JL..............
    You can buy the generic materials and even a few basic buildings. Figurines you position and paint too. But beyond that you design and build it yourself.

    The imagination just for the concept of a "town" of that size is nothing short of staggering.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCRider View Post
    You can buy the generic materials and even a few basic buildings. Figurines you position and paint too. But beyond that you design and build it yourself.
    I'd make similar town also but my next weekend is booked

    Amazing is understatement for that model!

  3. #13
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    I am happy to see that this thread has generated some interest. I felt a bit foolish posting it considering that this is a website for machinist discussion, but with hindsight I think maybe a machinist can better appreciate the attention to detail, precision, and forethought that went into this creation.

    I was particularly fascinated by the 'Cracker Jack' electric sign. Did you guys get the implication Selios was making? The sign is intentionally defective as if some of the lights were burnt out or the ballasts were defective. The 'Cracker' word doesn't light up at all and the others just flicker. I remember seeing signs like that way back when I was a kid. Wasn't that easy to replace bulbs in those big signs so some would stay out for a long time till they could get around to fixing them.

    Willy, I agree that there don't seem to be any dedicated hobos but if you look carefully you will see a man sitting on roof obviously hiding from the boss *LOL*

    From Wikipedia :

    The F&SM uses the same initials as Sellios' company and is co-located in the FSM company office. It is a stylized model railroad set in 1935 in a fictional area of New England during the Great Depression. It is characterized by cluttered scenery, colorful billboards and signs, simulated dilapidation, weedy sidewalks, heavy weathering and artistic license.

    Active in the hobby since he was 13, Selios' first influence in the hobby was John Allen who took a novel, whimsical approach to model trains. Allen's influence can be seen in Selios' work which favors fantasy over the prototypical. Sellios began construction of the F&SM in April 1985. He dedicates approximately three months per year to the endeavor, with the remaining nine dedicated to design and production for his business selling model structure kits. Sellios' F&SM is a large diorama occupying a space measuring approximately 1,600 square feet (150 m2). Sellios' model railroad has become one of the most recognized over the years, with several features in Model Railroader and an episode of Tracks Ahead. Selios has a large following of model train enthusiasts in the United States, where his exaggerated, caricature style is emulated by hobbyists and cottage industry "craftsman kit" makers.

  4. #14
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    Unbelievable --- trains probably coal stoked with a little auger and the room even has that coal smell

    seriously what powers these? do they vary or are most just electric in the grid/tracks?

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Tiers View Post
    Some rolling stock looks newer than 30's, but..... Yowza.

    And then

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hR5P...k#t=115.123375
    I have to wonder, how do you keep all that track clean????
    I remember back wen I used to play with model railroad the biggest issue was keeping the brass rail from oxidizing, well actually it couldn't be prevented just required frequent cleaning. When it did oxidize your train would stop dead or jump due to loss of electrical contact. I used to use a gritty rubber eraser to clean the rails, but with that size layout and some sections of track that are out of sight and probably out of reach how do you prevent this???
    It looks like some of the track is nickel plated so I guess that helps.

    JL..................

  6. #16
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    I've always been fascinated by model train layouts. Used to go to the model shows as a kids with my dad, and we have a enough HO track at home to get it out every once in a while and run the trains. Never had enough space to setup a layout permanently. Still have it all and more, as dad has picked up a bunch more trains, cars and track at various yard sales over the years. Hopefully my kids will take an interest in it and we can setup a semi permanent layout in the basement. Until then I've really lost interest in it myself, as I just don't have the time, but can certainly appreciate the amount of effort and detail that go into them. If we ever build one it will have a giant trestle. I've always just wanted to build a giant trestle for some reason.

  7. #17
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    If you run on the track regularly it generally stays clean. Just like full scale does.

    I suppose if you went whole hog, you'd have a rail grinder train with wire brushes. Brush fires optional.......


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z487VFV-Nhs
    Last edited by J Tiers; 04-21-2017 at 01:51 PM.
    1601

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  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeLee View Post
    I have to wonder, how do you keep all that track clean????

    It looks like some of the track is nickel plated so I guess that helps.

    JL..................
    Nickel silver rail instead of brass. Keeping a railroad free of dust is still constant chore.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Tiers View Post
    If you run on the track regularly it generally stays clean. Just like full scale does.

    I suppose if you went whole hog, you'd have a rail grinder train with wire brushes.......
    No rail grinders but they sell track-cleaning cars...

    http://www.aztectrains.com/
    Regards, Marv

    Home Shop Freeware - Tools for People Who Build Things
    http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

  10. #20
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    If anyone is ever in Northern Germany, it's worth visiting Miniatur Wunderland in Hamburg. If you want to see anything else in Hamburg you'll need to stay at least a second day, because it takes a whole day to go around all the layouts. 15,400 metres== 9 5/8 miles of HO track!
    Last edited by Mark Rand; 04-21-2017 at 06:14 PM.

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