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Thread: WTB Die Filer

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    SW Michigan
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    Default WTB Die Filer

    I need a good working or repairable die filer. Thanks!
    You can lead people to knowledge but you can't make them think.
    "Lead, follow, or get out of the way."-Thomas Paine

  2. #2
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    Jan 2003
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    Deep in the Heart of Texas!
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    I've got most of the parts to build one. That project has been on my To-Do List for years. After getting an air file, the project kept loosing priority.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    Madison Wisconsin
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    I was looking for a die filer several years ago, and found several. Unfortunately they were outrageously priced, and files were hard to come by. I decided to see if a a Scroll saw could be modified to do the job. After looking around for a while I found some 1950's era Delta catalogs. I was surprised to find the Delta 40-440 scroll saw could be purchased with a die filer attachment. (It's really nothing more than a different blade holder.)
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Delta-24-In-...cAAOSwBOtY8pdM

    I purchased one at a local used equipment dealer for next to nothing and have been using it ever since. It's not as robust as a commercial band filer, but it certainly does a good job for what I do.
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Do-All-Verti...8AAOSwZVlXuzPn

    If you do decide to check them out look for one with the variable speed drive. It's basically an adjustable sheave that gives infinite speed control. The less expensive models use a stepped pulley system for speed control.

    The attached links are for examples only. I have no affiliation with either party.

  4. #4
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    Jan 2003
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    3,631

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    Die filers...yeah.

    25 years ago I bought a high end die filer (don't recall the brand name right now) that had been consigned to a local machinery dealer by a large manufacturing company. Given new technology die filers were rapidly becoming obsolete then. This seemed like winning the lottery at the time. All the available accessories were included, several types of over arm file supports, magnifying lamp, lots of new files, etc, even a stool that matched the stand. The machine could do anything, the stroking could be changed to various orbital paths so the file backed off on the upstroke. All sort of adjustments like that. Over the years occasionally I'd turn it on just to hear it purr totally vibration free. In all the time I actually only used it once to do a non-precision squaring up of a drilled hole.

    Last year I decided as wonderful a machine as it was it was taking up shop space. So I decided to sell it. It was on CL for 4 weeks with only one nibble. Lowered the price to a hundred bucks which was less than the value of the files. It still didn't sell for another week.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Independent principality of Sinquefieldia (formerly Missouri in the USA)
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    25,253

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    The usefulness of a die filer is directly proportional to the goodness (sharpness) of the files you have.

    I have quite a number of files, as in close to 100. They all FEEL sharp. however. when I recently wanted to file a corner out (for a V-type drill and reamer turret tool) the first file I used was getting no-place at all. I located an apparently identical file, and tried it. Same cut and coarseness. The second file did the job so fast I almost overshot the mark, where the first file was just "not cutting it", literally. Both files felt about the same when checked with the thumb, a test that usually works well for cutters.

    With sharp files, you will find a decent die filer to be useful for some things that are just hard to do otherwise.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    940

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    Quote Originally Posted by DR View Post
    Die filers...yeah.

    25 years ago I bought a high end die filer (don't recall the brand name right now) that had been consigned to a local machinery dealer by a large manufacturing company. Given new technology die filers were rapidly becoming obsolete then. This seemed like winning the lottery at the time. All the available accessories were included, several types of over arm file supports, magnifying lamp, lots of new files, etc, even a stool that matched the stand. The machine could do anything, the stroking could be changed to various orbital paths so the file backed off on the upstroke. All sort of adjustments like that. Over the years occasionally I'd turn it on just to hear it purr totally vibration free. In all the time I actually only used it once to do a non-precision squaring up of a drilled hole. Last year I decided as wonderful a machine as it was it was taking up shop space. So I decided to sell it. It was on CL for 4 weeks with only one nibble. Lowered the price to a hundred bucks which was less than the value of the files. It still didn't sell for another week.
    I had a similar experience. Mine was a very nice All American brand with dual overarms and variable speed. Owned it about 15 years, used it twice for minor jobs. Put it on CL for $400 bucks and sold it the next day to some newbie who wanted to make some kind of plastic forming dies. Good luck.

    RWO

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    5

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    I have a Butterfly Die Filer I would sell. Very heavy. In perfect condition. It has the overarm for filing and for scroll saw. The table can tilt. I have a number of files, maybe 30 or so. And if someone wants to pick up, you can get the cabinet it came on.

    I'm in North Carolina so not next door for the original poster!

    Jacques

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    SW Michigan
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    Bought & flew a 1936 from Angier, NC & a Bonanza from Greensboro, be a long flight on a die filer but thanks!
    You can lead people to knowledge but you can't make them think.
    "Lead, follow, or get out of the way."-Thomas Paine

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Posts
    7,898

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    Quote Originally Posted by projectnut View Post
    I was looking for a die filer several years ago, and found several. Unfortunately they were outrageously priced, and files were hard to come by. I decided to see if a a Scroll saw could be modified to do the job. After looking around for a while I found some 1950's era Delta catalogs. I was surprised to find the Delta 40-440 scroll saw could be purchased with a die filer attachment. (It's really nothing more than a different blade holder.)
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Delta-24-In-...cAAOSwBOtY8pdM

    I purchased one at a local used equipment dealer for next to nothing and have been using it ever since. It's not as robust as a commercial band filer, but it certainly does a good job for what I do.
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Do-All-Verti...8AAOSwZVlXuzPn

    If you do decide to check them out look for one with the variable speed drive. It's basically an adjustable sheave that gives infinite speed control. The less expensive models use a stepped pulley system for speed control.

    The attached links are for examples only. I have no affiliation with either party.
    I have 2 of those saws I've tried to give away, any chance of pics of the file attachment?
    You can lead people to knowledge but you can't make them think.
    "Lead, follow, or get out of the way."-Thomas Paine

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Independent principality of Sinquefieldia (formerly Missouri in the USA)
    Posts
    25,253

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by projectnut View Post
    I was looking for a die filer several years ago, and found several. Unfortunately they were outrageously priced, and files were hard to come by. I decided to see if a a Scroll saw could be modified to do the job. After looking around for a while I found some 1950's era Delta catalogs. I was surprised to find the Delta 40-440 scroll saw could be purchased with a die filer attachment. (It's really nothing more than a different blade holder.)
    .....
    The reverse works too. Put a saw blade in the filer and you have a saw. The original filer I had (and sold years ago) I looked up the patent for, and the patent showed it as both a filer and a saw.
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

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