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Thread: WTB Die Filer

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Madison Wisconsin
    Posts
    302

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    Quote Originally Posted by flylo View Post
    I have 2 of those saws I've tried to give away, any chance of pics of the file attachment?
    I do not have any pictures of the blade/file chuck. However I do have a link to the 1953 Delta product catalog:

    http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/1141/16785.pdf

    The proper chuck is pictured at the top right of page 52. From what I gather after reading several of these catalogs from the late 1930's through the 1950 is that it came standard on some models and was optional on others. If yours has this chuck it will take up to a 1/4" diameter round file. The files available at the time are pictured on page 53.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    N.E. Arizona
    Posts
    847

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    Thanks for the link. Just saved it.
    Best wishes to ya’ll.

    Sincerely,

    Jim

    "To invent you need a good imagination and a pile of junk" - Thomas Edison

    "I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream. Frustrating!" - Me

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    St. Louis Metro area
    Posts
    520

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    Quote Originally Posted by J Tiers View Post
    The usefulness of a die filer is directly proportional to the goodness (sharpness) of the files you have.

    I have quite a number of files, as in close to 100. They all FEEL sharp. however. when I recently wanted to file a corner out (for a V-type drill and reamer turret tool) the first file I used was getting no-place at all. I located an apparently identical file, and tried it. Same cut and coarseness. The second file did the job so fast I almost overshot the mark, where the first file was just "not cutting it", literally. Both files felt about the same when checked with the thumb, a test that usually works well for cutters.

    With sharp files, you will find a decent die filer to be useful for some things that are just hard to do otherwise.

    I've been buying the diamond coated files,works good!
    Feel free to put me on ignore....

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Posts
    7,584

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    Thanks for the link, I have 2 of these just sitting so that's ideal!
    You can lead people to knowledge but you can't make them think.
    "Lead, follow, or get out of the way."-Thomas Paine

  5. #15

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    I have a good head from an old Oliver die filer with stepped flat belt drive pulley and nice looking brass tag. Weighs 60 or 70 pounds I think. I'd take $25 cash if someone showed up, not too excited about shipping it. If anyone gets to north MN stop by!
    I once thought of making a filing machine from a pump jack I have. It has a pulley drive and vertical stroke maybe 8-10". Just needs a file holder and some sort of work table from an old jig saw or something. It would only work on the outer edge of pieces as there would be no over arm arrangement.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Kirkland, Washington
    Posts
    1,583

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    To anyone considering buying a die filer, I suggest you consider how you intend to get files for it BEFORE you buy the machine. To my knowledge nobody makes them any more.

    metalmagpie

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Rochester Hills Mi
    Posts
    1,313

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    Fly, local Craig's list has a Butterfly die filer in Sterling Heights. Kinda pricy tho. .btw, I never got the NAMES button. Bob.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    332

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    Re: source for die filer files. Pick the file you want, cut off the tang, braze a shank on the other end, being careful to get the shank aligned with the file. Done!

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    8,806

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    Quote Originally Posted by metalmagpie View Post
    To anyone considering buying a die filer, I suggest you consider how you intend to get files for it BEFORE you buy the machine. To my knowledge nobody makes them any more.
    They're still available although I can't swear they are not NOS. Not cheap though.

    Quote Originally Posted by alsinaj View Post
    Re: source for die filer files. Pick the file you want, cut off the tang, braze a shank on the other end, being careful to get the shank aligned with the file. Done!
    You've done this?
    Last edited by Mcgyver; 05-19-2017 at 02:35 PM.
    .

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    332

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    You've done this?

    I remember seeing an article in HSM or PIM showing how to do it. Not difficult. Just make sure the teeth are oriented to cut on the downstroke. If brazing the shank on, take precautions to prevent drawing the temper out of the file (wrap the cutting part in wet paper towels, or similar). Come to think of it, you could tack weld the shank on using mig/tig -- great strength not required. That would reduce or eliminate the annealing problem. With triangular or square files of sufficient size, you could just anneal an inch or so of one end and turn it down to a round shank in the lathe. Another approach would be to modify the clamp on the die filer shaft so you can clamp flat, triangular and square files of various sizes directly on the shaft.

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