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Thread: superglue and total loss.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Default superglue and total loss.

    My experience living in a generally remote area in the highlands is to when buying shop sundries, is to buy in smallest bulk packages. This both saves and wastes money. I buy all types of glue and have found Gorilla and superglue do not have a reasonable shelf life considering the overall cost. Buying it locally is usually much more expensive. You would not believe the amounts of such glue I end up finding has gone completely solid in the container only to be thrown out.. I bought some a few years back I mean about six years plus and it took up after advice a very small area in my refrigerator all bottles clearly marked out in a poly bag. Having been used to them becoming solid and the fact the could not be heard to swish about in their little container bottles, I just left them assuming that all the effort to check them etc would prove to be fruitless expenditure of my time and energy. I was very surprised when Bron told me she had used some quite recently in fact I was dumfounded. I did a trial test on one bottle the only one of about six that had ever been opened. It worked as good as new. So I feel like I won a watch at the fairground. Alistair
    Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

  2. #2
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    Jan 2006
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    I have not personally done this but have been told that Superglue will keep much longer if kept in a ziplock bag and in the freezer. Gorilla glue is very sensitive to moisture so any type of humidity will set it off. Inside a bag and in the freezer might also extend it.

  3. #3
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    Yep, I have a mini-fridge on the bench for superglue and Loctite, they keep for at least a couple of years without gelling in the bottle (closer to three so far, no deterioration), and it's a handy spot for a beer or two

    Dave H. (the other one)

  4. #4
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    For CA glue I've got some in unopened bottles that are approaching 5 years old and when removed from the fridge and up to room temp work just as good as when new.

    There are a couple of tricks to doing this. First off take note that it is humidity that ruins the CA glue. So be sure to let the bottle warm up to room temp before opening it. And don't put opened bottles back into the fridge. Or at least if you do then take some precautions such as putting them into a good sealed jar along with some active silica gel so the air in the jar is bone dry. Again though be sure to let the whole jar warm up to room temp before opening it. So this trick is really only good if you know you won't use the opened bottle for some time and can afford the delay at the other end.

    The CA glue does not freeze at normal fridge temperatures so you can also put it into the freezer for even more assurance of a good long life.

    What DOES kill CA glue is junk coming back into the bottle. Dust and other foreign matter gives the glue something to crystalize onto. For this reason I always buy the glue in the 1/2oz bottles and live with the slightly higher cost. Even then I use teflon tubing as a tip extension and take care to form a drop on the end of the tube which then wicks to the work when applied. Over time though we are not always that neat and a blob of crud builds up on the end of the tube. Being teflon it usually simply pulls off and I carry on. In some cases I have to trim the end or even replace the small tube. But the tube does a lot to save the glue that is in the bottle. The size is something like 28Ga or 32Ga ID teflon tubing as used a lot in electronics.

    Hope that helps you.

    As for the polyurethane glue (which is what Gorilla Glue is) I know it's hellishly sensitive to moisture in the air. So anything you can do to cut off the supply of humidity will help. Again a well sealed bag or other container along with a good size pack of freshly baked silica gel so it's keen to suck up moisture could well give you a lot of extra storage time.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2002
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    Texas
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    The super glue that I purchase usually comes in sealed tubes that must be punctured to open. I find that they last for years with no real precautions. I do store them in a air conditioned environment, my shop.

    After I open them I also store them in the shop, but I store them in a vertical position with the opened end UP and the cap on securely. They generally last six months to a year stored like this.

    I buy them 10 or 12 tubes at a time on the web.

    I also store other types of adhesive in that same manner, well capped and vertical. It seems to work for most. Since I have a number of prescriptions, I use the empty plastic pill containers for this and many other storage uses in the shop.
    Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 07-15-2017 at 12:01 AM.
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hopefuldave View Post
    Yep, I have a mini-fridge on the bench for superglue and Loctite, they keep for at least a couple of years without gelling in the bottle (closer to three so far, no deterioration), and it's a handy spot for a beer or two

    Dave H. (the other one)
    Until you mentioned that you keep a couple beers in that fridge I was going to say it's costing you a lot more in electricity to run that fridge than the glue is worth.

    JL....................

  7. #7
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    Jan 2003
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    Deep in the Heart of Texas!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hopefuldave View Post
    Yep, I have a mini-fridge on the bench for superglue and Loctite, they keep for at least a couple of years without gelling in the bottle (closer to three so far, no deterioration), and it's a handy spot for a beer or two

    Dave H. (the other one)
    Ditto on the mini-fridge except mine is not on a bench. I built a special shelf on a wall to hold the fridge. Bench top space is at a premium around here.

    Plenty of room to have water, pop and beer along with shop adhesives, rubber tape or anything else that deteriorates quickly.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
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    Atlanta, GA, USA
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    All of this stuff about cyanoacrylate glue in the refrigerator sorta works, but the REAL answer for keeping cyanoacrylate glue liquid for a long time is as follows. I use bottles of the thin watery type and keep it on my workbench for YEARS! You have to understand that cyanoacrylate glue is set off by water in one form or another (vapor or liquid) that is a catalyst that chemically causes it to harden. Keep moisture away from cyanoacrylate glue and it will last almost forever!

    Here is how I keep cyanoacrylate glue in my shop. I put my bottle of glue in a large mayonnaise jar (with a good lid) with a large package of silica gel (a desiccant that absorbs moisture from the air). Silica gel is cheap and easily available. Just Google "buy silica gel" and scan through the available options and sources. I got mine in an aluminum container that fits inside the jar with the glue. It has a little color dot that changes color when the silica gel is saturated. No problem, just put it in an oven at a temperature slightly over 212 degrees to drive the moisture out and you are ready to go again. As long as you keep the glue in the jar with the silica gel and the cap on tight, It will last for years.

    One other recommendation. Make the application of cyanoacrylate glue more precise and controllable by sticking a hypodermic needle on the bottle applicator end. These come with a tapered plug-in base that fit into medical syringes and these tapered bases fit onto my bottles perfectly! I also use a Dremel tool and abrasive disk to cut the pointed tip off. Hypodermic needles come in many diameters so pick one that suits you. I get mine at the local pharmacy and they are cheap. I guess at the age of 76 I don't appear to be a druggie so I have no problem.
    Last edited by Planeman41; 07-15-2017 at 02:19 PM.

  9. #9
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    Farm and ranch supply stores typically have these needles too.

  10. #10
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    Mar 2015
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    Super glue will last very long time if you KEEP MOISTURE AWAY. The ziplock bag, and the freezer = very dry air. It's not the temperature that does it, I don't think.

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