Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 33

Thread: Turn a Drill Press into a Dedicated mill?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ashburton, near Christchurch New Zealand
    Posts
    6,236

    Default

    I am sure if you look through model engineering hobby magazines of post WWII Great Britain you will see any number of clever projects being completed with the milling done on light weight machines and lathe attachments few of which with the power or rigidity of that drill press.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
    Posts
    2,679

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Weston Bye View Post
    Unlike the rest of these guys, who give opinions based on hearsay and reasoning, I actually did it once - following the Rudy model. Suffice it to say that the drillpress survives and serves to this very day, returned to its original condition and purpose, the rest of the components scattered to the corners, shelves, boxes, nooks and crannies of my shop, (hopefully untraceable to the folly of the original construction) and validating all the opinions given to this point in this thread.
    EDITED RETRACTION=

    I wrote a reply based on the idea that you were lambasting us for being negative. But upon proof reading my reply and your post I see that you are actually in agreement. So sorry if you saw the first post before this edit.

    As someone that also tried it I nod in agreement when You Tube'ers reach the same conclusion. But it's just an idea that simply will not go away! ! !
    Last edited by BCRider; 08-12-2017 at 06:00 PM.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    9,163

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BCRider View Post
    hat's all fine and good. But I tried it with the same drill press that he's asking about and it was an outright iron clad failure. ...snip....I have no idea what the "Rudy model" is
    His looks like a decent drill press - there's a take up for clearance on the quill - what he locks the quill it with. Those offshore ones without that ability make imo a poor drill press and are unusable for what he's doing (as you found out) as you can't clamp the quill

    I don't know what he's doing to lock the taper arbor in. Without some mechanism to deal with that, this is something that shouldn't be done imo just for safety reasons. You most definitely can knock our a morse taper with lateral force

    Quote Originally Posted by The Artful Bodger View Post
    I am sure if you look through model engineering hobby magazines of post WWII Great Britain you will see any number of clever projects being completed with the milling done on light weight machines and lathe attachments few of which with the power or rigidity of that drill press.
    Lots of great pieces for sure. I've ME back to the 30's fairly complete and don't remember seeing it in the drill press. There are numerous pieces on milling in the lathe....If you don't have a mill, look to the lathe as Dan suggests.
    Last edited by Mcgyver; 08-12-2017 at 06:14 PM.
    .

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Springfield Mo
    Posts
    180

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by danlb View Post
    In all fairness, people have been doing it for years. In 1954 Popular Mechanics provided plans that would allow you to do milling safely on a drill. The article is at https://books.google.com/books?id=Au...epage&q&f=true . It's not quite as involved as people think.

    For a maker space, they might be enough for people to learn on till you can get some good equipment.

    Dan
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but didn't that PM article entail building an entirely new spindle that was just powered by the drill press mechanism? I'm sure it works, but that's a lot of effort for relatively little reward

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    San Antonio TX, USA
    Posts
    1,792

    Default

    I'm definitely speaking from experience. I use it alot as a mill and I've done quite a few difference projects on it. Plus the XY table with digital calipers on it is very handy for drilling a series of holes where I want them, relative to an edge or a feature.






    like using a small flexy crappy lathe, it teaches you the basics, teaches you good technique (because you need all the help you can get to do anything) and is pretty forgiving when you screw up.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    San Antonio TX, USA
    Posts
    1,792

    Default

    in case you were wondering, it's an LED light that goes in the trunk lid of my Outback, so that the ground behind the car is illuminated when the trunk is open. Love it to bits.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    SF East Bay.
    Posts
    4,406

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by epicfail48 View Post
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but didn't that PM article entail building an entirely new spindle that was just powered by the drill press mechanism? I'm sure it works, but that's a lot of effort for relatively little reward
    The PM article calls for making an extension that is supported by an arm, like an end mill holder with a long shaft. The arm supports the extension and takes care of the side loads. The extension passes through a bushing in the arm that lets it move up and down with the chuck.

    The article is pretty short ( one page) and the design is simple. One could probably make it in a day, maybe two. An X-Y table would probably take longer to make than the "milling arm".

    Dan
    Measure twice. Cut once. Weld. Repeat.
    ( Welding solves many problems.)

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Medford MA
    Posts
    515

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PlanlosChannel View Post
    ...This settles it I will just continue to store them until my buddy and I open our non profit public maker space. We want to have one open to help out our local kids that have nothing better to do than grow weed...
    Probably a much better use of the drill presses...

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    160

    Default

    I have "milled" with a drill press. Its just not made for it. None of mine are anyway. However I have removed metal by cranking an XY vise under a mill clamped in the chuck. Notice I put milled in quotes. My biggest drill press is a floor model with a 16" throat. Its also my worst drill press. Its got a lot of flex and a lot of run out. That being said most of the drill presses I have seen really have to much run out to be decent mills. Anything under 1/4" would probably be at constant risk of snapping off. I have seen a few very heavy industrial drill presses that would probably make fair mills. The problem is they cost as much as a middle weight mill, and more than a lot of small mills. Even when I find one of those at an equipment auction they often sell for more than a decent small mill.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    308

    Default

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RDLmFl_zDf0

    Whenever this subject comes up I post the above vid and let you make your own conclusions. I've experienced the same failure with side loading the JT taper.

    lg
    no neat sig line

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •