Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 29 of 29

Thread: Tractor frame to be milled on bridgeport

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Sunny So Cal
    Posts
    3,650

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Norman Bain View Post
    Have it the OP is enlarging the oil pan hole 3/4" all the way round and cutting off the rear engine mounts.



    Would it be a practical option to drill a series of 1/4" holes around the oil pan hole, then break out the section and finish off with a grinder?

    Dang big job regardless.
    That would work. Clamp a thick plate to the bottom to close the hole then use a mag drill with annular cutter. It will eat. JR

    Here is mine eating some of my welding table.

    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    9,107

    Default

    drive by posting? where'd he go?

    if it really is white cast iron, good luck milling it....its the territory of ceramics and edm afaik.

    I also don't get why if the engine fits now and repairing a crack needs extensive milling. Drill a hole at the end of the crack to stop if spreading and decide if its worth the huge preheat, weld the crack
    .

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Sunny So Cal
    Posts
    3,650

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mcgyver View Post
    drive by posting? where'd he go?
    Go figure right... Umm? This--->



    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    1

    Maybe he is out the with a jig saw as Forrest recommended. In that case he might be a sec before posting again And I agree with Forrest. Id rather put a days worth of work in on the ground than working with that on my BP. JR
    Last edited by JRouche; 09-13-2017 at 11:47 PM.
    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Kelowna BC
    Posts
    400

    Default

    I want to hear more about removing the 3/4 inch by these two methods. .
    Drilling the 1/4 inch holes first then sawing or grinding.
    Using the mag base and annular cutters..

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    5,422

    Default

    The OP posed this question on the 8th, looks like he last returned to check for replies on the 10th. Since no replies came in regarding his question until the the 12th it looks like he may have given up on us so any replies are likely moot at this point.
    Including this one.

    From reading his post carefully it appears that a shop modified the original frame and in doing so compromised the the frame's integrity by using a plasma cutter. From what I gather he has acquired a replacement frame and is hoping to modify it to fit the B series Cummins that now resides in the original cracked frame.

    Rather than court disaster by trying to mill the frame in a Bridgeport to accommodate the Cummins oil pan, would it not be an option to modify or fabricate a new oil pan to fit the frame? After all sheet metal is easier to work with than white cast iron. Then the frame would only need the original engine mounts removed. Perhaps using an angle grinder with the appropriate wheels and coolant.
    Home
    Good judgment comes from experience, and experience....well that comes from poor judgment.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Chester, NH
    Posts
    5,234

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mcgyver View Post
    drive by posting? where'd he go?

    if it really is white cast iron, good luck milling it....its the territory of ceramics and edm afaik.

    I also don't get why if the engine fits now and repairing a crack needs extensive milling. Drill a hole at the end of the crack to stop if spreading and decide if its worth the huge preheat, weld the crack
    We should send help. Maybe he's pinned under a toppled Bridgey!

    I'm assuming he's starting with a replacement frame but I agree milling is not the right solution. The crack on the original can be welded or brazed with the correct prep work and preheat. Alternatively, if it's not true white cast, then a sawzall and/or grinder could be used to enlarge the opening on a new frame. I didn't immediately think of the sawzall, I'd take an abrasive saw over the sawzall - do it outside somewhere with a garden hose to keep things cool and control dust. It will be slow but less physically demanding than working the sawzall. Or maybe I just buy cheap blades for my sawzall and end up fighting it more than I should...

    Actually... I kind of wonder about cutting it with a plasma cutter and then stress relieving the frame. It's a big piece to be sure but it's a good time of year for a big bonfire!

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    9,107

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fasttrack View Post
    We should send help. Maybe he's pinned under a toppled Bridgey!

    I'm assuming he's starting with a replacement frame but I agree milling is not the right solution. The crack on the original can be welded or brazed with the correct prep work and preheat. Alternatively, if it's not true white cast, then a sawzall and/or grinder could be used to enlarge the opening on a new frame. I didn't immediately think of the sawzall, I'd take an abrasive saw over the sawzall - do it outside somewhere with a garden hose to keep things cool and control dust. It will be slow but less physically demanding than working the sawzall. Or maybe I just buy cheap blades for my sawzall and end up fighting it more than I should...

    Actually... I kind of wonder about cutting it with a plasma cutter and then stress relieving the frame. It's a big piece to be sure but it's a good time of year for a big bonfire!
    we're thinking on the same lines, except you preheat before cutting. If it is white cast iron, heat maybe the only practical way to remove material....the guys who did it before likely didn't preheat enough (or at all). I'm reminded of forge base repairs which we looked at getting into - its a different scale than this but similar principles. Picture a 100 ton block of cast steel, 60" high, 8 feet lond and 4' across......while not cast iron, they will readily crack or break in two from the existing crack if not done carefully. Preheat to 600 degrees, oxygen lance out past the crack (now thats a spark show!), start welding while keeping it at 600. Its weeks of 24/7 soaking the part in a tent to get it and keep it that hot, lancing and welding is done with big leveraged arms as you'd cook if too close.

    either prehat to remove material from the new part with the plasma, or do preheat to remove past the crack then start welding
    Last edited by Mcgyver; 09-14-2017 at 10:28 AM.
    .

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    9,107

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Willy View Post
    The OP posed this question on the 8th, looks like he last returned to check for replies on the 10th. Since no replies came in regarding his question until the the 12th it looks like he may have given up on us
    .
    guess you have to be fast on feet in the free consulting business . It such an extreme HSM job its kind of interesting with or without him.....assuming a cracked tractor frame....
    .

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    5,422

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mcgyver View Post
    guess you have to be fast on feet in the free consulting business . It such an extreme HSM job its kind of interesting with or without him.....assuming a cracked tractor frame....
    The free engineering and consulting biz is faced paced and ruthless, if you don't step in immediately someone else, or heaven forbid another forum, will steal your thunder. Let the ideas and opinions flow. LOL

    Yup, doesn't matter at this point whether he's part of the game or not. At this stage it doesn't really matter because as you say it is an extreme HSM project and it deserves all of our full attention, part of the reason I waded in.
    Home
    Good judgment comes from experience, and experience....well that comes from poor judgment.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •