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Thread: Tractor frame to be milled on bridgeport

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
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    Kelowna BC
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    499

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    I set up the roller stand to hold the overhang weight, and allow table movement in one direction. Once set up the table moved normally. I don't think I ever got over 500 lbs. Had no crane to lift. Probably had a hand getting it on the table .

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    South Wales
    Posts
    621

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    Sounds a real challenge, some pics would be good, is there no way you could weld it?

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    SE Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    50

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    I know this a machining website, but I think the tub frame from an 1850, 1950 or 1900 would be the best solution. Hard to say from OP but sounds like you're getting a new tub anyway. They are quite a bit wider to allow perkins or Detroit engine to fit. I believe it would bolt on to your 1650 transmission. I have heard, but never seen, that a 5.9 cummins is a near drop in replacement for perkins on 1850. That is likely where the SAE bell housing for your conversion came from
    Last edited by Captain K; 09-13-2017 at 09:06 AM.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Friesland, Netherlands
    Posts
    2,160

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    Captain K,

    Yes, but then we wouldn't get to see the photos of a Bridgeport bolted to a tractor

    Ian
    All of the gear, no idea...

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    SE Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    50

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    Also you don't say where you are. I have an 1850 frame if your close enough to come get it.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Clovis CA USA
    Posts
    252

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    Try a head grinder
    If cost to high then hand scape like would for lathe
    Both will work
    For the holes just pilot type boring bar or if hole out of round use harden drill bushing and a ream

    Dave



    Quote Originally Posted by Grunex125 View Post
    Hi all:
    Heres one for consideration, ideas sure are welcome.

    In a few weeks or so I will be starting on a machining project that is sure to test the rated capacity of my Bridgeport mill. This is not a matter of do or don't it must be done plain and simple. I have on our farm a Oliver 1650 tractor that was repowered with a cummins B series diesel. when the shop originally did the repower they cut the cast iron frame with a plasma torch to make way for the oil pan and had to remove the engine mounts to make way for the bell housing. The problem being is that the heat that was generated from the Plasma torch ultimately set up a stress fracture in the frame and it was cracking and would soon break completly through if we had left it go. Don't get me wrong it's been twenty four years since we repowered, but still...........the crack has been there for a long time and gradually getting worse.

    What I am dealing with is white cast that is 1.250" thick at it's thinnist point, the frame will weigh in excess of 500 lbs, is approx. 7.5 feet long, 14" deep, and 20" wide.

    What I am thinking of doing is lay a couple of pieces of heavy channel iron across the table and secure channel to table and set the frame on top of that and secure into channel.
    I can secure the frame to the table but will depend on using the ram to move from one side of the frame to the other to cut out both sides of the oil pan hole with only slight movement on the y axis. I don't need to be real precise, +,- .050 on all sides but I do need to hog out about .750" on both sides.
    I'm planning on running low rpms with a roughing end mill, and having to reset every 20" of x travel. Because I know heat is what set up the crack originally, I'm thinking of retrofitting a windshield wiper pump and makeshift resivore for flooding with coolant. With the oil pan hole hopefully successfully machined I will have to flip the frame over to machine the engine mounts out.

    Outside of the obvious, heavy, big item and awkward to handle what are some of the pitfalls I should look out for?

    I've been machining for 25 years, but never tackeled anything this big and cast at that, so I'm open for suggestions.

    thanks in advance, pls Google Oliver 1650 tractor to get an idea of what I am about to undertake.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    central MA
    Posts
    161

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    To clarify, are you doing additional modifications to your existing frame that has a crack in it, or are you machining a different frame to fit your modified tractor? If you are starting with a new frame and doing the mods needed by machining rather than what was done with a torch, then i suggest you take the advice from Forrest Addy and rig up some secure counter weights. That, plus your idea for using channel to skid the frame into rough position should work fine.

    Have you considered a weld repair on the existing frame? This might involve adding additional support to the frame, followed by stress relieving the finished job, but might be easier and stronger in the long run.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Northwest Washington
    Posts
    239

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    Could a stitching process be used here?

    https://www.metalock.co.uk/typical-o...stitching.aspx

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    637

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    The OP does not say he is reworking a fresh tub to replace the old; but I think that is the plan.

    OP also does not have enough posts to HSM yet to have permission to post photos.

    Have surfed around some and found this image that I think is similar to the problem space being described. The image is of an Oliver 1550. The OP's is a 1650.

    Have it the OP is enlarging the oil pan hole 3/4" all the way round and cutting off the rear engine mounts.



    Would it be a practical option to drill a series of 1/4" holes around the oil pan hole, then break out the section and finish off with a grinder?

    Dang big job regardless.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Bremerton Washington
    Posts
    5,755

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    WTF!!! Is that IT?? That's a SawzAll and bi-metal blade job. Dress it up with an angle grinder. Take you about 8 hours about the same time as setting it up and cutting clearance on a Bridgeport. If you do a good job it will be neat and contoured as if cast in that shape.

    Balance it out. 8 hours of moderately vigorous had metalwork and $50 of SawzAll blades Vs certain damage to a $3000 Bridgeport.

    A little economical smart sweat VS lazy heedlessness. This is one of those situations where there is no replacement for honest work.

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