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Thread: Band Saw Riser Block

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by olf20 View Post
    Thanks Beazld, that would help!
    You gona get any storm where you live?
    olf20 / Bob
    Bob, no damage here, too far north for that, just fine by me. I 'll take some pics and measurements
    just because it's "new" doesn't make it good or better, just because it's "old" doesn't make it bad or worse.
    It's only paranoia if they aren't really after you.

  2. #22
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    Increasing the centre distance between the upper & lower wheels is fairly straightforward mechanically. But as it also increases the distance between the upper & lower blade guides, isn't more blade tension required to prevent blade flex under cutting load? If anything, all this adding of riser block stuff will tend to make the frame weaker, not stronger. Some of the photos that I see are, what, doubling the distance between blade supports?

    Or is the idea to avoid blade flex by lighter feed pressure?

    Ian
    All of the gear, no idea...

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian B View Post
    Increasing the centre distance between the upper & lower wheels is fairly straightforward mechanically. But as it also increases the distance between the upper & lower blade guides, isn't more blade tension required to prevent blade flex under cutting load? If anything, all this adding of riser block stuff will tend to make the frame weaker, not stronger. Some of the photos that I see are, what, doubling the distance between blade supports?

    Or is the idea to avoid blade flex by lighter feed pressure?

    Ian
    As someone that also does wood working and uses a large bandsaw with deep cutting ability I can say that all the concerns you posted are valid. The blade guide issue is why I posted that there's far more to all this than just the riser block.

    There's no doubt that the 14" saws are not at their best when re-sawing wider boards. The filler block is a bit of a Band Aid to get by when occasionally the owner wants to run off some wider re-sawing and will do so with some care and respect for the lighter nature of this saw compared to the larger and far stiffer saws that normally do deep re-sawing.

    The stiffness of the Delta and similar clones does not support the use of wider blades. More than once I've seen write-ups that say it's pretty much at it's limit with 1/2" wide blades. The frame simply won't support the bending loads needed to tension anything wider to a correct level. And 1/2" is pretty narrow for serious re-sawing. But for that once a year job with a good freshly sharp blade and a lighter feed it can do just fine.

    The only other down side to the riser kit is that the upper blade guide rod is increased in length and would be more prone to flexing when cutting when it's lower to the table for thinner cuts. So all in all a compromise for sure. But with care and some sensitivity to avoid over loading it and keeping the blade sharp they can do fine in the home shop.

  4. #24

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    I have a bunch of walnut that my late brother gave me.
    I started making wooden spoons and bowls. The length
    of the wood is about two feet long. I just want to cut the
    pieces in half, then slab off some 1" thick wood to make
    some spoons. I have way too much to just let it go to waste.
    I'll let the cnc mill surface the slabs to size. This should beat
    using a chain saw???
    olf20 / Bob

  5. #25
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    Jan 2007
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    Northern California
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCRider View Post
    As someone that also does wood working and uses a large bandsaw with deep cutting ability I can say that all the concerns you posted are valid. The blade guide issue is why I posted that there's far more to all this than just the riser block.

    There's no doubt that the 14" saws are not at their best when re-sawing wider boards. The filler block is a bit of a Band Aid to get by when occasionally the owner wants to run off some wider re-sawing and will do so with some care and respect for the lighter nature of this saw compared to the larger and far stiffer saws that normally do deep re-sawing.

    The stiffness of the Delta and similar clones does not support the use of wider blades. More than once I've seen write-ups that say it's pretty much at it's limit with 1/2" wide blades. The frame simply won't support the bending loads needed to tension anything wider to a correct level. And 1/2" is pretty narrow for serious re-sawing. But for that once a year job with a good freshly sharp blade and a lighter feed it can do just fine.

    The only other down side to the riser kit is that the upper blade guide rod is increased in length and would be more prone to flexing when cutting when it's lower to the table for thinner cuts. So all in all a compromise for sure. But with care and some sensitivity to avoid over loading it and keeping the blade sharp they can do fine in the home shop.
    My 14" Delta runs nicely with 3/4" X 103" bi-metal 3-4 Skip tooth blade. It's plenty stiff with a 6" riser. I've often resawed on it for guitar backs, sides and fingerboards. Proper technique gets the job done.

    Anything larger than a 2" X 10" board would require a larger saw perhaps but this saw has served me well for many years.

  6. #26
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    Aug 2010
    Location
    Flint, Michigan
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    Quote Originally Posted by olf20 View Post
    I have a bunch of walnut that my late brother gave me.
    I started making wooden spoons and bowls. The length
    of the wood is about two feet long. I just want to cut the
    pieces in half, then slab off some 1" thick wood to make
    some spoons. I have way too much to just let it go to waste.
    I'll let the cnc mill surface the slabs to size. This should beat
    using a chain saw???
    olf20 / Bob
    If you are thinking of halving 2 foot log sections small enough in diameter to go through your band saw, I'd put your money into a froe and a mall. Much faster going, following the grain, no dangerous exposed blade, do not have to make a sled for the saw, ......just split it out.

  7. #27
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    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
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    That's good to read GNM. I have to admit that my post was not based on personal experience but as I mentioned reports and reviews in magazines from some 20 and more years back when I was researching for my own bandsaw that would provide me with the depth for re-sawing.

    I ended up with a beast of an old thing built by some company back in Quebec for only a few years just after the war.

  8. #28
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    Jan 2012
    Location
    Central Virginia
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beazld View Post
    Bob, no damage here, too far north for that, just fine by me. I 'll take some pics and measurements
    The riser block that came with my 14" Rockwell wood band saw is 6" high. It has locating pins on one end and corresponding holes on the other. Ths kit cimes with a longer blade guide bar, longer bolt and longer blade guard for the back side and an extension for the front blade guard. Looks like it would be relatively easy to fabricate your own.
    just because it's "new" doesn't make it good or better, just because it's "old" doesn't make it bad or worse.
    It's only paranoia if they aren't really after you.

  9. #29
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    Jan 2007
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    Northern California
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCRider View Post
    That's good to read GNM. I have to admit that my post was not based on personal experience but as I mentioned reports and reviews in magazines from some 20 and more years back when I was researching for my own bandsaw that would provide me with the depth for re-sawing.

    I ended up with a beast of an old thing built by some company back in Quebec for only a few years just after the war.
    In that era, 1970's, Delta (Delta-Rockwell) was building a saw that was a good performer. They had their own company stores that stocked all of the parts and accessories that you might see in one of their catalogs. It runs well with blades from 1/8" to 3/4" .

    If you check on eBay or Amazon, you will see that 3/4" blades in 93" or 105" (Delta-Rockwell sizes) are very common.

    I'd be willing to bet that that your "old beast" bandsaw is better built than many of the choices available today.

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