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Thread: Workshop Projects.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2017
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    New Jersey
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    Default Workshop Projects.

    I picked up a Chas Parker 974 vise a while back. I decided to clean it up and make it work smoothly again. I also slapped on a coat of paint on it and made a video about it.

    I hope you guys like it. It was allot of fun rebuilding and cleaning this old soldier up and putting it back in service in my home shop.

    -Bruno


    Oh and the video.

    12x16" Delta 3d printer (Built from scratch)
    Logan 825 - work in progress
    My Blog - http://engineerd3d.ddns.net/
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    Dracut, Massachusetts
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    Wow, that's like a museum grade clean up. Nicely done. The last old vice I got (used from CL) got the grease washed off it and went straight to the edge of my welding table/workbench.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Texas
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    10,847

    Default

    Nice rebuild job. It looks really good.

    I appreciated seeing the friction device for the handle. I wonder if I can retrofit my vises with such a device. I need to figure out a way to drill a hole and tap it without messing up the handle. Perhaps I can put some shim stock in there and stop when my drill hits that shim.
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  4. #4
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    Nov 2006
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    durban s africa
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    Default

    Nicely done. I have two questions. If I were to service a vice with bad jaws, how would I get a cross hatch pattern on the jaws without owning a shaper.
    Could you explain the friction device. Would a standerd thrust bearing hold up or would it get crushed?
    Thanks for the video.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Kendal, On
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    751

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    Nicely done. I have two questions. If I were to service a vice with bad jaws, how would I get a cross hatch pattern on the jaws without owning a shaper.
    Could you explain the friction device. Would a standerd thrust bearing hold up or would it get crushed?
    Thanks for the video.
    Cock your vise to the side 45* and use a single point engraving cutter in a vertical mill.

    For horizontal grooves, you can grind all but 1 flute from a tap and side mill with it. I've got a 3/8"-16 I've done that too, and use it once in a while for putting finger grip grooves on odd shaped hand apply gauges for checking fixtures I build at work. Works great.

  6. #6
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    May 2017
    Location
    New Jersey
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alanganes View Post
    Wow, that's like a museum grade clean up. Nicely done. The last old vice I got (used from CL) got the grease washed off it and went straight to the edge of my welding table/workbench.
    I wanted to do the same, but realized that once I tore it down it was fairly easy to stone the sides and wire brush some of the body and flap wheel the jaws to clean it up nicely. In for a penny and in for a pound, I decided to paint it while i was at it. Funny thing is that the paint cost 1/2 as much as what I paid for the vise. I paid $20 for the vise and $10 for a quart of paint. I still think I am ahead on this one and now have a nice tool to use that is a pleasure to use and looks good (at least for a while).
    12x16" Delta 3d printer (Built from scratch)
    Logan 825 - work in progress
    My Blog - http://engineerd3d.ddns.net/
    Youtube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVY...view_as=public
    Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/engineerd3d/?hl=en

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2017
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    New Jersey
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by plunger View Post
    Nicely done. I have two questions. If I were to service a vice with bad jaws, how would I get a cross hatch pattern on the jaws without owning a shaper.
    Could you explain the friction device. Would a standerd thrust bearing hold up or would it get crushed?
    Thanks for the video.
    I do own a shaper now but did not use it in this application as the jaws were fine, however barring that I do not have one and I needed to machine the cross hatch on a set of jaws. I have done it in the past with little more than a marker to mark the surface and a set of triangular needle files. The outcome is not perfect, but its good enough for the task.

    I thought about a thrust bearing in the vise, and I may upgrade to one at some point. I doubt it would crush, the O-Ring is in there for only one reason, to provide a positive feel on the handle and reduce slop. It is in there to be crushed.
    12x16" Delta 3d printer (Built from scratch)
    Logan 825 - work in progress
    My Blog - http://engineerd3d.ddns.net/
    Youtube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVY...view_as=public
    Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/engineerd3d/?hl=en

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Stevens Point, WI
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    Nice rebuild, looks great! First time I ave ever seen the brake shoe type lock, very interesting and good looking design!

    With mounting the vise to the bench, normally the reason they offset the bolt pattern is so the base can be slid way up to the edge of the bench. If you clamp a bar in the vise vertically it should clear the bench edge.
    Andy

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    NW Illinois
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    It is too pretty to use. Now you have to buy an new vise for dirty work.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
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    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
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    Default

    That's a fine vise and a fine restoration job.

    For future videos though either bypass the wire wheel and similar work or at least speed up the work segment by 4x. I valued the little breaks you took to explain things and noted how well it worked at the reduced speed. But watching you actually doing the wire wheel work was not adding anything to the video other than run time.

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