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Thread: A question for the gun guru's on rifling

  1. #1
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    Default A question for the gun guru's on rifling

    do rifling buttons circularly twist themselves to form the helix when pulled through the bore, IE:does the angular shape of the ridges on the button do it or do they need some kind of mechanism to do it.
    The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

    Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

  2. #2
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    As far as I know, both methods are used. It would depend on the button design itself as to which method is used. There are also different styles of button depending on whether it is pushed or pulled through the barrel blank.
    Jim H.

  3. #3
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    You might want to post a question about guns in the gunsmithing forum.
    I am sure that the people who hang out there would be able to help!!

  4. #4
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    As I understand it, the vast majority utilize the helix angle ground into the button to determine the twist rate. That's why some button rifling shops have a tolerance of plus or minus 1/2" on the specified distance for a complete turn of the rifling. Trying to steer the button with the push or pull rod is problematic since it is a long skinny steel rod and is therefore rather flexible in torsion.

    RWO

  5. #5
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    The buttons self-regulate the twist rate due to the helix ground in to the button. That's why the first inch or so of a button rifled barrel needs to be discarded as it comes off the machine. The 'pusher' is typically free spinning with the button's own motion.

  6. #6
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    This thread caught my eye as in "I always wondered how they do that." So I looked up rifling buttons. They don't appear to have any ground cutting edges. I'm I correct in that they deform the metal and not cut it? Something akin to rolled threads vs cut threads?
    Definition: Racecar - a device that turns money into noise.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by browne92 View Post
    I'm I correct in that they deform the metal and not cut it? Something akin to rolled threads vs cut threads?
    Correct.

    It is an economical way to mass produce rifling.

    Single point cut rifling may be slightly better quality for benchrest rifles, but is a slower process and costs a little more.

  8. #8
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    Here's a bunch of you tubes on manual & machine button rifling https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...ifling+process
    You can lead people to knowledge but you can't make them think.
    "Lead, follow, or get out of the way."-Thomas Paine

  9. #9
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    Thanks guys. I will take it as a yes, that is pretty much what I hoped for.
    The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

    Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

  10. #10
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    I think there is a means of rotating the pull rod as the button is pulled through. While the button does have the "twist" in it, the pull rod is also rotated.

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