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Thread: O/T: Welding hard pads onto dozer blades?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by CPeter View Post
    I have a little John Deere Dozer that i plow snow with. I would love to put calks (that is the correct name for those pieces of steel) on my machine, but it would really tear things when I use it otherwise.
    CPeter

    My snow plow fleet:
    That's a fine looking homestead you've put together. Is that a 1010 sporting a Lord loader I see?

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by CPeter View Post
    I have a little John Deere Dozer that i plow snow with. I would love to put calks (that is the correct name for those pieces of steel) on my machine, but it would really tear things when I use it otherwise.
    CPeter

    My snow plow fleet:
    Is that crawler a 40?

  3. #13
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    Mar 2005
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    Montana
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    I heard some of the grousers were welded on cross ways of the tracks so the Cat won't skate on a icy side hill.

    Hal

  4. #14
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    Nov 2007
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    NW, Montana
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    As per willys photo, half inch re-bar in 2 inch sections welded on in a 1-2-1 pattern will do the trick.

    Bones

  5. #15
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    Ah, come on. This is a machinist board. Retractable studs, mill a pocket in the thread sections. Servo motors for precise control of the amount of protrusion. Battery powered, with solar recharging. Wireless control, WiFi or whatever. I could whip it all out in an hour or two with the stuff in my scrap drawer.
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  6. #16
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    I wonder if the bolt on rubber pads for working on pavement would help on ice. They are large & I bet they would or larger angle pcs bolted to the outer edge of the shoe so it won't side slip & you could take them off in the spring.
    You can lead people to knowledge but you can't make them think.
    "Lead, follow, or get out of the way."-Thomas Paine

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
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    616

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    Ah, come on. This is a machinist board. Retractable studs, mill a pocket in the thread sections. Servo motors for precise control of the amount of protrusion. Battery powered, with solar recharging. Wireless control, WiFi or whatever. I could whip it all out in an hour or two with the stuff in my scrap drawer.
    I could use something like that for my lawn mower. I get it stuck at least twice a month in the Spring.

  8. #18
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    Aug 2004
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    Sunny So Cal
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    Great responce, I figured there were some cold area folks here.

    CPeter. I like that photograph. Looks inviting and well maintained. Nice camera work also.

    The cleets , shoes or grousers. I was thinking of a bar that would be welded to both faces of each (or a variety) track blade. So now that I have seen all the correct ways of doing it. Mine wouldn't keep the tractor from sliding.

    Wish I had some land. Im jealous.. Well, just so I could get a tractor of course. Thanks, JR
    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

  9. #19
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    Oct 2005
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    British Columbia
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    Quote Originally Posted by flylo View Post
    I wonder if the bolt on rubber pads for working on pavement would help on ice. They are large & I bet they would or larger angle pcs bolted to the outer edge of the shoe so it won't side slip & you could take them off in the spring.
    Most guys around here in the forestry industry usually just weld on short sections of grouser bar because 95% of the time they are in mud, dirt, or bouncing off of granite boulders all day and they need durability and traction. I don't think rubber pads would fill either of those roles very well. I think bolting something onto the edge of a track shoe would be hard on the shoe as they can break. Not only that but track shoes don't come with holes on the outside edge and drilling holes in that stuff would not be a picnic.
    The grousers are only really needed when roading a machine from landing to landing as the compact ice/snow from logging truck traffic can be quite hard.
    However even the weight of a D8 won't penetrate the ice without ice grousers of some sort and skating sideways off the road happens quickly enough to warrant their use. It gets real expensive fast when your machine is upside down next to the road and more often than not that ride over the bank can be a 100 footer!

    However there is a bolt-on solutions available that works well. Not sure what the total cost of ownership difference would be between the weld-on grouser bar vs the bolt-on, but like I mentioned earlier most stick to the weld on option around here.

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  10. #20
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    One has to love those "Track Claws". They have all the features of indexible tooling, but for tractors. I bet they make a fortune off of those tool holders.. er, I mean mounting plates.

    Dan
    Measure twice. Cut once. Weld. Repeat.
    ( Welding solves many problems.)

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