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Thread: Video-how to use a tape measure-H Depot

  1. #61
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    In the older vehicles if you lost a belt you just had to drive fast enough for the wind to turn the fan which turned the water pump.
    Andy

  2. #62
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    Just curious... How many of you followed your Father (or mother) into their profession? I grew up being able to ask my Dad anything and thinking he knows how to do everything. When my father bought the family a computer (Commodore VIC-20) back in the early 80's I was absolutely fascinated with it and for the first time my Dad couldn't really offer much help as he didn't have much computer experience. Computers have been my passion and career ever since but I always wondered why I.. Was it because it was something my Father couldn't help me with? Or was it just a coincidence..
    When in doubt, doubt your doubt.
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  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
    Just curious... How many of you followed your Father (or mother) into their profession? I grew up being able to ask my Dad anything and thinking he knows how to do everything. When my father bought the family a computer (Commodore VIC-20) back in the early 80's I was absolutely fascinated with it and for the first time my Dad couldn't really offer much help as he didn't have much computer experience. Computers have been my passion and career ever since but I always wondered why I.. Was it because it was something my Father couldn't help me with? Or was it just a coincidence..
    Skipped a generation with me. My grandpa was the sort of guy who'd fit in here perfectly; my dad was a pastor. I'm really fortunate to have shared my life with both men.

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
    Just curious... How many of you followed your Father (or mother) into their profession? I grew up being able to ask my Dad anything and thinking he knows how to do everything. When my father bought the family a computer (Commodore VIC-20) back in the early 80's I was absolutely fascinated with it and for the first time my Dad couldn't really offer much help as he didn't have much computer experience. Computers have been my passion and career ever since but I always wondered why I.. Was it because it was something my Father couldn't help me with? Or was it just a coincidence..
    I landed in computers *because* my father didn't know anything about them - he was a physicist with Sandia National Labs. His dad did everything during the depression from hard rock mining to greengrocer. My son followed my father into physics, almost into astrophysics which would have been cool for a Kepler (but high energy lasers was still pretty cool).

    I'll add that my father wasn't (he's still here in body but his mind is pretty much gone) some highbrow scientist to me - he taught me how to tune an engine, work on a differential, taught me how to fish, hike and camp; he and my mother made sure that we seldom spent a weekend at home with things from skiing in the winter to touring national and regional parks in the summer. My wife has not found a state park or monument I didn't visit as a kid, and we took our kids to a bunch of them. I wish now that I had found the time to get them out backpacking more, but I spent 20 years travelling with a lot of that time out of the country.

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by vpt View Post
    In the older vehicles if you lost a belt you just had to drive fast enough for the wind to turn the fan which turned the water pump.
    Left a Mint low mileage mint suzuki samurai set up for off road at camp in the UP. We broke a fan belt neat Mass City, tied a rope on but the water pump only turned when the knot hit it but got us to town where they had a gas station/ store/ parts store. The parts store was closed but they said ir you can find it go ahead & we found it & popped it back on with no tools.
    You can lead people to knowledge but you can't make them think.
    "Lead, follow, or get out of the way."-Thomas Paine

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
    Just curious... How many of you followed your Father (or mother) into their profession? ......
    I followed my father in terms of some of my hobbies and interests. Wood working and metal working. But for a living I went into electronics. Trained in telecommunications specifically. Oddly enough my father sort of followed me when he took up some electronics as a hobby later in life in terms of building up audio amps and trying to find the "magic scratch filter" for his old 78 rpm records.

    My father had this thing for BIG STRONG sanding machines for his wood working. Some of my most distasteful memories of woodworking center around breathing in the clouds of dust.... did I mention that he also poopoo'ed any sort of safety gear? So it's a freakin' miracle that I ever took up wood working. But when I did it was all about planes and shavings instead of grits and dust. To this day the ONLY power sander I've got in my wood shop came from his shop which he gifted to me one Christmas after he bought an even bigger one. And I still hate using it just because it's a sander.

    One thing I did inherit or otherwise soak up was the ability to look at something and picture a way to work on it or otherwise see my way through steps to accomplish a job. Like he often did I frequently will build some tool or other item or adapt something instead of driving out and buying the specific tool. Generally I find I can make what I need in less time than it takes to find it on the interwebz or to drive out and back.

  7. #67
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    My grandfather was a core maker at Erie Forge and Steel. My dad started his career by pouring iron by hand in the foundry. Went to night school and worked his way up through the machine shop and retired as a manufacturing engineer. I guess I was born with the gene. Took metal shop in High School, then spent four years in electronics with the Air Force and hated it. Went right back into machining after the AF.
    “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

    Lewis Grizzard

  8. #68
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    The degree filter as applied today would have kept Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Thomas Edison, George Westinghouse, and Albert Einstein from getting hired. How many others have we turned away?

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by garyhlucas View Post
    The degree filter as applied today would have kept Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Thomas Edison, George Westinghouse, and Albert Einstein from getting hired. How many others have we turned away?
    I know of several. One other guy had the degree, but the HR guy didn't even forward the resume' to me, he didn't think the applicant was a good fit for the job. I did not know the applicant existed until he managed to call me. We hired him like a shot, and he was one of the best guys we had.

    One of the worst things that has ever happened is this "rules are rules", "zero tolerance", "follow procedures and never deviate from them" crap. It's as if suddenly all those fussy librarians have taken over.

    Even ISO9XXX, which has its very good points, is often abused. You can be ISO9000 making wineglasses, even if you hit each one with a big hammer after it is set in the shipping box. As long as the hammer is calibrated and the hitting procedure is documented, you are golden.

    While I totally get the point of ISO, it seems to have somehow missed the OTHER point, in an odd way. The assumption is that if you follow all your procedures, you will make good product. And that should be true. Often is true. But focusing on that one thing tends not to necessarily improve the product, but sometimes seems to let it fall to the lowest acceptable level.

    The riles for hiring, and the rules for who can and cannot be salaried, etc, are much like that also. They tend to drive toward the lowest acceptable level of employee, and you have to work hard to avoid that.
    Last edited by J Tiers; 10-12-2017 at 06:59 PM.
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  10. #70
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    I think this is a slightly veiled example of a problem I saw a long time ago in schools. Too many "teachers" only teach by memory. They don't really understand a subject themselves so they make the students memorize the facts and then parrot them back on the tests. No understanding is imparted.

    Math: just remember the tables. But forget any understanding of what is going on.

    History: History is my favorite bitch about teachers. Just memorize the dates. Don't worry about what was actually happening. Just tell me what date this or that happened. I hated history until I finally got a good history professor in college. It was a required course and I was not looking forward to it. But he told the story and it was fascinating. I have loved reading about history ever since.

    Science: Remember the names of the chemicals or just memorize the formulae. Don't worry about what they mean. This spills over to engineering. When you wonder why a bridge collapses or a building burns down, just look at engineering classes in our universities. Memorize, memorize, memorize. But understand nothing.

    Literature: Oh boy! I think one of the best ways of explaining how I feel about the literature classes I took was a short story by one of my favorite authors, Isaac Isamov. Now he was a very prolific author in several areas, so I don't think any one can say his opinion does not count in this discussion. He told a si-fi story about the English author William Shakespeare being transported forward in time. Will, being amazed and curious about his works being the subject of university classes in our day, registers for one such course. And in the story, Shakespeare flunked Shakespeare. Even the author could not understand what the professors were teaching about his own works. Asimov did wonder if his works would ever be the subject of such courses and he wondered if he could pass such a class. Apparently his opinion of university professors ideas mirrors my own. I believe he was using humor to get a very profound point across.

    Etc., etc., etc.

    The last thing that our "teachers" teach is how to think for yourself.



    Quote Originally Posted by barracudajoe View Post
    Several years ago he had to start asking people during interviews if they knew how many 1/8's, 16ths, 32nds and 64ths were in an inch and only about 1 in 25 could answer correctly. One guy went right through them, answering correctly until, just screwing around I asked "how many 124ths", he stopped for a moment then said "You got me on that one, I never got that high in school". We've also given them items to measure and have them write there answers down and then go over them after they leave. One answer I remember was 12 and 3 medium lines (correct answer of course was 12 3/8") A lot of our work is metric and most young people don't seem to even know what that is but I bet if I asked them to divide a kilo cocaine into 4 equal portions, they'd have it down to a fraction of a gram!
    Paul A.

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