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Thread: OT: Gun Safe/Cabinets

  1. #21
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    A 15 minute rating on a gun safe means that it will take 15 minutes with tools normally found in a home garage. The rating may or may not apply to only the door, the door and walls, or the door, walls, top and bottom.

    The rating becomes meaningless if you add specific tools like plasma cutters and angle grinders to the mix.

    On the other hand a security safe utilizes much more of everything. They have thicker steel, in layers. They have layers designed to break drill bits and still more that bind and break abrasive discs. Even so, a security safe will still only hold up to attack for an hour or two. You are expected to have an alarm and police response to stop them before they finish breaching the safe.

    Dan
    Measure twice. Cut once. Weld. Repeat.
    ( Welding solves many problems.)

  2. #22
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    To be able to steal guns, one has to know where they are. To help my neighbor with his new gun safe, we decided to "hide" the safe in plain sight. The safe had to be in the garage so we obtained an old upright freezer and hollowed out the guts. We placed the freezer shell over the gun safe and now it looks like a home freezer in the garage. To the thief who breaks in and is searching, he will not waste his time looking in a freezer.
    Last edited by BigBoy1; 10-11-2017 at 05:49 PM. Reason: Typo!
    Bill

    Being ROAD KILL on the Information Super Highway and Electronically Challenged really SUCKS!!

    Every problem can be solved through the proper application of explosives, duct tape, teflon, WD-40, or any combo of the aforementioned items.

  3. #23
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    A 15 minute rating on a gun safe means that it will take 15 minutes with tools normally found in a home garage......
    Not any of OUR home garages I suspect....

    OK, getting back to the original question..... 3PL, it helps if you think about the room in the safe/cabinet in terms of volume and access paths instead of just the wall space around the edge. And also start with the premise that the comb that attaches to the sides up high to space out the rifles and shotguns is useless.

    In my safes (it called them that on the box ) I went with some wood rails with holes spaced at 1/2" increments. Into holes I screwed long screws that were covered with force fit clear vinyl tubing to organize the guns. On top of that I went with an alternating one muzzle up, the next muzzle down arrangement so they would fit with less lost space/volume. In with this could be "saddles" that are secured by the screws to space out the barrels or stocks for those rifles with scopes. I didn't bother but I don't have many with scopes, it was easier to just lean them out more. I also gave up on really using the whole rear wall. Instead there is only one shotgun that lives back there in one case.

    Handguns are a whole other thing. They are tough to store neatly in a mixed hand and long gun setup unless the safe/cabinet is HUGE. At least if you have more than what fits easily and neatly in the top shelf of something like a 16 gun model.

    In any event don't be afraid to make up your own shelf and separator inserts. Then just glue or otherwise attach some suitable matting or padding to the parts to prevent slivers

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
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    Not a gun safe but a safe safe is one my uncle has. Its a floor safe with a big fat door on it. So then becomes the issue of lifting the door. It has some wacky looking leverage type hinge thing to aid with that. JR
    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

  5. #25
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    I like muzzle down as excess oil runs down. Also I like the sofas that are for gun storage.
    You can lead people to knowledge but you can't make them think.
    "Lead, follow, or get out of the way."-Thomas Paine

  6. #26
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    Dec 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCRider View Post
    Not any of OUR home garages I suspect....

    OK, getting back to the original question..... 3PL, it helps if you think about the room in the safe/cabinet in terms of volume and access paths instead of just the wall space around the edge. And also start with the premise that the comb that attaches to the sides up high to space out the rifles and shotguns is useless.

    In my safes (it called them that on the box ) I went with some wood rails with holes spaced at 1/2" increments. Into holes I screwed long screws that were covered with force fit clear vinyl tubing to organize the guns. On top of that I went with an alternating one muzzle up, the next muzzle down arrangement so they would fit with less lost space/volume. In with this could be "saddles" that are secured by the screws to space out the barrels or stocks for those rifles with scopes. I didn't bother but I don't have many with scopes, it was easier to just lean them out more. I also gave up on really using the whole rear wall. Instead there is only one shotgun that lives back there in one case.

    Handguns are a whole other thing. They are tough to store neatly in a mixed hand and long gun setup unless the safe/cabinet is HUGE. At least if you have more than what fits easily and neatly in the top shelf of something like a 16 gun model.

    In any event don't be afraid to make up your own shelf and separator inserts. Then just glue or otherwise attach some suitable matting or padding to the parts to prevent slivers
    Thanks for the ideas. I didn't even consider just making my own rails/bump-outs to fit everything. The "safe" that I ordered looks like it has pockets on the door for the handguns. I'm not sure if I'll keep them there or not. I currently just wrap each of them in a quality gun towel and put them on the shelves. I usually have to unwrap each one to find the one I want though.
    When in doubt, doubt your doubt.
    www.metalillness.com

  7. #27
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    Here is a picture of the door with pockets. I only have a few handguns but doesn't look like there are many pockets for new ones

    When in doubt, doubt your doubt.
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  8. #28
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    When I bought my safe the best deal I found was at Tractor Supply for a Winchester,it was shipped free to the local store and on sale for $100 off to boot.Moved it in with an appliance handtruck,but I had a buddy help me remove and reinstall the door which made the body of the safe a 275lb load and the door a 175lb load.

    I stuck with the factory shelves and inserts.This is a "24 long gun" safe,not really,it will only fit 24 long guns if the shelves are gone and they are stacked in kinda tight.Reality is it's a 10 long gun with shelves and maybe 6 handguns on the door with pockets.

    This safe has a 1/2" cloth covered MFD on the inside of the door.I took the factory pouches off and screwed in place some cheap Cordura fabric holsters.It was the best I could come up with,since the holsters are designed to fit each model of gun.

    As far as security,like anything it's only going to keep honest people honest.If the mfgs wanted to help the situation they could at least make the outer shell from something like AR500 plate,which would mean the angle grinder trick would take several hours and a few boxes of wheels to open one up.
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  9. #29
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    The video in post #17 says it all: no safe is "safe".

    If you're paranoid about the bad guys getting your stuff, you got to be creative about hiding it. Get a cheap safe and put your cheap replaceable (inoperable) weapons in it. Mod a deep closet by putting a false back in it and keep the good stuff there. My dad kept his firearms behind the hardwood lumber. He had six or seven at any one time and therefore took little room. Or some other dodge - a phony heat plenum in the utility room. A fake water heater.

    Divert some of the energy used to scare yourself to finding novel places and ways of concealment. Give the bad guys something sparkly to find after a little effort so they'll think they committed a successful burglary. Meanwhile, the true valuables are ingeniously concealed in plain sight where they'd never think to look - like under the false bottom of a disused chest freezer in the garage. Clutter the freezer top convincingly - a laundry basket of old clothes and two cans of paint - and it should probably stink if opened. Easy access, excellent concealment, entirely mundane, and easily overlooked

    BTW. If you want to keep a secret, never reveal there is a secret to anyone in the first place. Got buddies coming over to talk guns? Transfer them to the cheap safe before they arrive.
    Last edited by Forrest Addy; 10-12-2017 at 12:02 PM.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forrest Addy View Post
    The video in post #17 says it all: no safe is "safe". Get cheap safe and put your cheap replaceable (inoperable) weapons in it. Mod a deep closet by putting a false back in it and keep the good stuff there. Or some other dodge - a phony heat plenum in the utility room. A fake water heater.

    If you're paranoid about the bad guys getting your stuff you got to be creative about hiding it. Divert some of the energy used to scare yourself to finding novel ways of concealment and diversion: give the bad guys something sparkly to find after a little effort and ingeniously conceal the true valuables in plain sight where they'd never find it - like under the false bottom of a disused chest freezer in the garage or on the back porch. Make sure the freezer stinks when you open it.
    Diversion.... That should definitely work too.. If I leave a trail of $100 bills on the floor inside from door to door then the bad guy will follow the trail right out the back door and ignore everything else.
    When in doubt, doubt your doubt.
    www.metalillness.com

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