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Thread: Is this knurling tool any good?

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Default Is this knurling tool any good?

    I am looking to buy a budget knurling tool for my clapped out 10x22 lathe.
    I read that the clamp type are desirable for smaller lathes.
    What do you think of this one?
    https://www.amazon.ca/KNURLING-TOOL-...=knurling+tool

    The shank looks pretty short, no?
    Cheers,
    Jon

  2. #2
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    This type is for smaller lathes to eliminate the high forces on the cross slide leadscrew. It should work well on aluminium, not so sure about steel.

  3. #3
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    The "squeeze" force is half that applied by the screw. The full scissors type is twice that. If youre only ever going to do aluminum probably OK but on steel it'll be a tough go. Build your own like that for a quarter or less the price.
    ...lew...

  4. #4
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    Looks serviceable... The wheels might be questionable but they are replaceable. Yeah shank looks disproportionate but you could drill and tap another hole and move it back if you needed more length, or completely make a new one. For ~$50 it doesn't look bad.

    https://www.amazon.ca/NON-KNURLING-T...=knurling+tool

    This one looks to be the same, just cheaper.

  5. #5
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    Whats a full scissor type?
    I was planing on using it for steel so I guess its a bad idea then eh?
    Thanks,
    Jon

  6. #6
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    So for knurling steel a standard knurling tool is needed then?
    I guess I could make up a follow rest of some kind to offset the stress on the headstock...
    Cheers,
    Jon

  7. #7
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    I have a similar one and now it has wear on the pins it will not produce the neat knurls it used to, I now have one of this type (among others)


    Less mechanical joints = less slack = neater knurls, works fine on steel but depending on setup YMMV.

    Paul

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Heron View Post
    So for knurling steel a standard knurling tool is needed then?
    I guess I could make up a follow rest of some kind to offset the stress on the headstock...
    Cheers,
    Jon
    You want a scissor tool, as it takes the pressure off the lathe, and puts it in the tool (in simple terms). The one that Paul shows above is a better style than those linked to amazon. We have one like that at work, and it's knurled thousands of feet of 01. The wheels themselves are wear items obviously, but the tool itself is a good one. KBC might have one that style if you want, I didn't see one on amazon.

    You could buy good wheels, and make your own tool, but I get that sometimes you just want to make things, and not make tools to make things......

  9. #9
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    I owned a scissor-type knurling tool from Enco for awhile. It worked just fine for me - on steel. Aside from that, I have seen some terrible stuff sold as knurling tools. First are the knurls themselves. I had some that I just couldn't make work. I removed the wheels and carefully counted. The wheels had different numbers of teeth! Further, if I set one down on its side on the bench and put a piece of 1/4" rod in the hole, it didn't stick straight up - on either wheel! Needless to say those went straight into the trash.
    So you do need to be cautious.

    Look for tools from Eagle Rock, made in the US. They are affordable and work fine.

    metalmagpie

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
    You want a scissor tool, as it takes the pressure off the lathe, and puts it in the tool (in simple terms).
    agreed - I won't even use my standard one because I don't want that kinda load on my mills bearings,,,

    there was a pic of a grizzly one that came up below the op's link that actually looks a little stouter than the one in the main pic...

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