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Thread: Dremel Tool Arbor Thread size? Replacement Screws?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCRider View Post
    For that much? Buy three packs of them and get on with your life.... As has been said it's not worth worrying about the ones with no screws.
    That's what I'm doing. Believe me, this is not slowing my life down very much. It's just a minor inconvenience.

  2. #12
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    All of this could probably have been avoided with the use of a simple device called a "jeweler's apron" made from an old towel and a few thumb tacks. As a long time model builder I have been using one for years. Just fold the old towel in half and tack one edge beneath the front edge of your workbench. When you sit down, simply pull the towel over your lap and up your front. Small parts that slip out of your fingers will fall into the towel and the rough towel and creases will keep them from rolling onto the floor. In addition, the towels keeps your pants and shirt clean of oil, drips, paint, etc and you can wash it out when needed.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Planeman41 View Post
    All of this could probably have been avoided with the use of a simple device called a "jeweler's apron" made from an old towel and a few thumb tacks. As a long time model builder I have been using one for years. Just fold the old towel in half and tack one edge beneath the front edge of your workbench. When you sit down, simply pull the towel over your lap and up your front. Small parts that slip out of your fingers will fall into the towel and the rough towel and creases will keep them from rolling onto the floor. In addition, the towels keeps your pants and shirt clean of oil, drips, paint, etc and you can wash it out when needed.
    That's an excellent suggestion.

    I went up to my second floor shop yesterday and did some reconnaissance on this matter. They are not 0-80, 1-72, 2-56, 1.4mm, 1.7mm, or 2.0mm. The threads are much finer than any of those. It's clearly a proprietary thread and they are not sold separately.

    One alternative to use my approximately 10 screwless arbors collected over the past 40 years will be to drill them with a #51 drill and tap them to 2-56. I have hundreds of those in stock as I use lots of them for my model railroad scratch building.This is slightly larger than the hole in the #409 or 420 ceramic cutting discs that I use, but the screw will readily thread into the center of the disc and can then be attached.

    Life goes on.

  4. #14
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    Apr 2014
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    This is slightly larger than the hole in the #409 or 420 ceramic cutting discs that I use, but the screw will readily thread into the center of the disc and can then be attached.
    If 1-72 will fit, I'd use that over the 2-56 for this reason. You're running those things up 15-30k RPM, you don't want any more stress on them than you have to have.

    I may be worrying about something that will never happen, it's just a rational fear of broken spinning cutting discs.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Puckdropper View Post
    I....

    I may be worrying about something that will never happen, it's just a rational fear of broken spinning cutting discs.
    Broken discs are a given, and that is nothing to do with the screw size etc......
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Puckdropper View Post
    If 1-72 will fit, I'd use that over the 2-56 for this reason. You're running those things up 15-30k RPM, you don't want any more stress on them than you have to have.

    I may be worrying about something that will never happen, it's just a rational fear of broken spinning cutting discs.
    Note my post above. 1-72 won't fit. I'll probably just forget about this project. since it's really just a waste of time. LOL.

  7. #17
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    Buffalo NY
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    The Dremel non-reinforced emery discs do use that small screw to secure to the mandrel.
    Whatever it is, you guys seem to have figured it out. One interesting thing I have found
    with those fragile emery cutting discs, is I started using them with my air turbine die grinder
    that spins 60,000 rpm. I must tell you, they are much stronger and last a lot longer at
    that rpm. Night and day difference. I forget exactly what I was doing, maybe some buggered
    thread repair with them, but they really cut at that speed.
    But for the electric Dremel tool, I have switched to the .035" thick and 1-1/4" diameter fiber
    reinforced cut off discs. I get them from McMaster Carr. They have a 1/8" hole, so I make
    my mandrels using a 5-40 screw, which measures .125" on the nominal. You can buy mandrels
    from McMaster, but I make them from silver drill rod.

    --Doozer

  8. #18
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    Apr 2016
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    USA
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    About 5 years ago I switched to Dremel EZ lock wheels. They're expensive, but they last a lot longer than any regular cutting wheel with the silly screw arbor.



    Sent from my XT1053 using Tapatalk

  9. #19
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    May 2002
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    Texas
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    That jewler's apron sounds like a nice idea, but this is what you really need:



    It makes finding dropped screws easy:



    It was written up in the August/September 2011 Machinist's Workshop. I can't tell you how many dropped screws I have found with it.

    It started with a standard telescoping, magnetic retrieving tool and I added an angle bracket to hold a flashlight head that can be adjusted to any angle. A couple of extra neo magnets and it is done. By adjusting the angle of the light to almost parallel to the floor, small screws, nuts, and other parts will cast a long shadow. That long shadow makes them stand out from the dust and dirt on the floor as well as the tile patterns that are intended to hide dirt. Then, if it is steel, the magnets pick it right up.
    Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 11-15-2017 at 01:20 AM.
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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