Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 38

Thread: Water resisting with Caulking

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    East Coast, USA
    Posts
    3,475

    Default Water resisting with Caulking

    So every time I have to caulk something to be water proof/resistant, I always end up making a F'n mess and my caulk beads always need to be redone with many passes and usually wind up looking nothing like the "pro"s. Yea, I've tried laying a very small bead and also wetting my finger, but I still can't get a perfect caulk line... Maybe I should just buy a bunch of caulk and practice until I get it down -- that would be the easy way I guess.. Never through about doing that and solve this problem once and for all but since I only caulk something maybe once a year or two, I'm sure if I master it now, it might not help me in ~2 years from now when I need to caulk something again -- or maybe it would-- like riding a bike?

    Anyway, I'm sure there are lots of people out there that don't see or understand how someone could have so much trouble but I do -- every time. Any suggestions?
    When in doubt, doubt your doubt.
    www.metalillness.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    East Coast, USA
    Posts
    3,475

    Default

    Ok, here is an interesting technique... Never heard of spraying with soapy water.. Maybe that helps remove the excess once the Popsicle stick passes buy pushing the excess out instead of the excess sticking to the sink or counter, or whatever two apposing surfaces you're caulking.. Damn good excuse to fill the freezer with banana pops though... I wonder how well this technique works when one surface is tiled and bumpy when crossing grout lines, etc..

    Link for cripples https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=idzezmW6URU

    Last edited by 3 Phase Lightbulb; 11-13-2017 at 04:31 PM.
    When in doubt, doubt your doubt.
    www.metalillness.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    1,963

    Default

    If it shows, I just place masking tape on both sides, caulk, spread with finger if needed, then remove masking tape.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Kendal, On
    Posts
    765

    Default

    Just like muding drywall, less is more. Put on a small continuous bead, then spit on your finger, and with a light touch form it into a nice fillet. IMO you don't want to be pushing/pulling excess material with your finger. That's what makes a mess. You just want to be reforming whats there. Hence the small initial bead.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    East Coast, USA
    Posts
    3,475

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Burdick View Post
    If it shows, I just place masking tape on both sides, caulk, spread with finger if needed, then remove masking tape.
    That's what I've done in the past but that only works for certain areas. I had to caulk where the cedar siding meets the trim before and that was vertically around ~30 feet and the calk line keeps changing as you run down (or up) each cedar board. I guess the tape would work good on the trim side, but never tried it on the clapboard side -- maybe I should have I also had to calk the exterior finish trim on my garage heater vent cap and had to retrouch it like 3-4 times before it looked OK I probably should have used blue tape on that as well but I know there must be a great way without having to do that. I also don't like the little ridge you get when you pull up the tape -- sometimes it lifts the caulk a little and gives you a tiny wall at the transition which doesn't look very good either. Maybe timing is the answer for that -- when do you remove the tape, immediately or wait a certain amount of time before lifting the tape, etc.
    When in doubt, doubt your doubt.
    www.metalillness.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    North Central Texas
    Posts
    2,273

    Default

    Can't see your video (never can, my ad-blocker I imagine). Post links also, so everyone can see them.

    This is how I lay perfect beads every time:
    Have perfectly clean surfaces with no loose debris
    Cut the minimum size hole in the tube (if the items are a good fit, this is a very small hole - generally the min dia that can be cut w/ a sharp blade)
    Cut the hole straight and NOT angled
    Apply at 90 degrees, pushing the caulk into any voids
    Only apply a tiny bit more caulk then required (takes experimentation at first) - most people put on way too much
    Keep a wet rag in the other hand and immediately clean finger after every wipe (that sounds bad)
    Clean the rag frequently in a bucket of water, if doing a lot of caulking
    After you get a good, consistent fill, do the final wipe in the other direction to ensure there are no voids (the finger will be dampened by the clean/wet rag)

    Really bad areas and big fillets will require another layer after the first has set up.
    If doing exterior caulking for the first time, areas with big gaps will need a first layer to fill all the big voids.
    Last edited by Joel; 11-13-2017 at 04:29 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
    Posts
    2,811

    Default

    For sealing the base line on tile back splashes around counters and around sinks the last few times I've been using Alex One. I found it's far more forgiving then RTV silicone caulking. And it is standing up REALLY well.

    In a perfect world I'd agree with Dan's idea above. But I know how imperfect I am. SO I lay masking tape about 3/16 to 1/4" on either side of the joint. I try for the rather minimal amount he suggests but if I err at all it's on the side of a slight bit too much. The tape makes for the perfect parking spot for the excess that goes around the sides of my finger. Then I peel it up pronto.

    Now Alex One is far more forgiving than RTV silicone rubber. But it does tend to skin over within at most a couple of minutes. So you can't dilly dally or the skin breaks up and makes a hellish lumpy mess. So work smaller lengths of joints or just one side of a window, sink or whatever. Lay in, smooth over then pull that side of the masking tape to remove the extra. Doing all this promptly aids with the edge laying down and rounding over in a very nice clean manner. This also means you need to overlay the masking tape with all this in mind.

    There's no need to wet your finger either. But you do want to make ONE PASS ONLY ! ! ! ! You'll mess it up really bad if you try to go back on it.

    The other good news is that it's very inexpensive as caulking options go. So you don't need a lot of soul searching to justify some practice on scraps first.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    East Coast, USA
    Posts
    3,475

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
    Just like muding drywall, less is more. Put on a small continuous bead, then spit on your finger, and with a light touch form it into a nice fillet. IMO you don't want to be pushing/pulling excess material with your finger. That's what makes a mess. You just want to be reforming whats there. Hence the small initial bead.
    Yes, I think subconsciously I'm trying to push it in while running your finger over it to make sure it's fully compressing and filling whatever void, or corner the caulk goes in. Sometimes it feels like the tip of the caulk gun lifts up a tad while you run a bead so you feel like you have to force it in later when running your finger down -- making a bigger mess. I guess once your confident that the bead you just ran is fully seated and your just reforming and not form-fitting, then you can feel good about just reforming it
    When in doubt, doubt your doubt.
    www.metalillness.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    229

    Default

    There is a thin white "caulk" from DAP that dries clear and seals very well to a lot of different things. It comes only in a squeeze tube to my knowledge, but I use the stuff all the time.

    DAP KWIK Seal Plus

    I used to use DAP Bathroom tub and tile sealant in a similar squeeze tube, that dried white, but I got a tube of this stuff by mistake once and I have been using it ever since.

    Sure, there are jobs where painters caulk is better, and jobs where only firestop caulk is allowed by code, but for everything else I use this stuff. Sealing drains in the bottom of a machine cabinet. Sealing the back of an outdoor dome camera to a wall without an eave to protect it. Making sure water doesn't run in behind a card reader or an outdoor intercom stations. Its good stuff.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Huntsville Ala
    Posts
    5,349

    Default

    For internal caulking, e.g. bathrooms, kitchens, etc. I have found PolySeamSeal to be far more forgiving of a talent deficiency than any other such product. I can usually get a pretty decent bead with it.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •