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Thread: Water resisting with Caulking

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Tiers View Post
    Question: If you DO use dish soap etc, then, if the "tooling" of the material causes it to spread out at all, does not the dish soap etc prevent the material from adhering and thus make a loose edge that is a point of failure? Seems as if ai ren into that.
    I don't really know to be honest. When I redid my bathroom a couple years back I wanted to make sure the time and effort I put into the rest of the reno wasn't lost to a ****ty caulking job. I'd never been good at it, so I went searching for tips and tricks to get better. Spit on the finger and a light touch is what worked for me. a light coating of dish soap on the finger was something I read at the time too, but to be honest I can't remember if i'd tried it or not. The spit DID work, water didn't. Water maybe wet, but it's not a good lubricant. Your finger is just a form tool to tool in the fillet. The spit helps your finger glide over the top without sticking. Key to the whole process I found is having the right amount of caulk to tool. Too much makes more of a mess than too little. Using your finger will allow for slight variations that a rigid tool will not.

    As with anything I don't think there is a magic tool or process for it, it's just practice. I made a couple really ****ty beads that I removed, before I got better and good enough to call it finished. I am by no means an expert, or even implying I really know what i'm doing, just sharing what worked for me. Learning how to run a continuous bead of caulk is a skill much akin to feeding tig filler wire. It just takes practice

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Tiers View Post
    Question: If you DO use dish soap etc, then, if the "tooling" of the material causes it to spread out at all, does not the dish soap etc prevent the material from adhering and thus make a loose edge that is a point of failure? Seems as if ai ren into that.
    I believe that's exactly why you use dish soap, etc. If you watch the video in post #2, spraying the bead with dish soap prevents the material from sticking to the exposed surfaces that the calk isn't already touching so when you "tool" it, it sticks only to your finger, or Popsicle stick and NOT to the surfaces that have dish soap on them. It shouldn't affect the areas that already have made contact with the caulk, but it prevents the caulk from sticking to additional surfaces as you "tool" it.
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  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
    I believe that's exactly why you use dish soap, etc. If you watch the video in post #2, spraying the bead with dish soap prevents the material from sticking to the exposed surfaces that the calk isn't already touching so when you "tool" it, it sticks only to your finger, or Popsicle stick and NOT to the surfaces that have dish soap on them. It shouldn't affect the areas that already have made contact with the caulk, but it prevents the caulk from sticking to additional surfaces as you "tool" it.
    Just to clarify, you're not suppose to spray the bead, you get a little soap on your finger tip. Same thing with the spit. You don't go horking all along the bead of caulking, just lick your finger tip a bit then tool it.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
    Just to clarify, you're not suppose to spray the bead, you get a little soap on your finger tip. Same thing with the spit. You don't go horking all along the bead of caulking, just lick your finger tip a bit then tool it.
    I think you are. It won't affect the bead or the surface the bead is already in contact with but it will prevent the caulk from sticking anywhere else. Watch the video in post #2. You can see the caulk refuse to stick at all except to the Popsicle stick. I'll have to try it myself some day -- spray soapy water on and then run your finger or forming tool like a Popsicle stick.
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  5. #35
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    Oh, I can now run a good bead as long as I want it to be.... But that is with the tube, un-tooled. I am now told that is a lousy (ok "inferior" ) way to do it, and I never had good results with the bogus "water" idea.

    Not sprayig the bead makes more sense, since if the "tool" pushes some material ahead and spreads it out, it presumably may not be "soaped" and will stick OK. Having it deliberately not stick due to spraying the area then means you need some way to remove it, seem to be potential problems there. Not sure that "water" would have been any better as far as allowing it to stick, so sounds like a "potato, potahto" issue to some extent.
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  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
    I think you are. It won't affect the bead or the surface the bead is already in contact with but it will prevent the caulk from sticking anywhere else. Watch the video in post #2. You can see the caulk refuse to stick at all except to the Popsicle stick. I'll have to try it myself some day -- spray soapy water on and then run your finger or forming tool like a Popsicle stick.
    I watched it. 2 different techniques. In the video he's removing the excess. I'm not, I'm talking about not putting any excess on in the first place. I'm just forming whats already there into a nice fillet. Think machining vs forging. Both probably acceptable depending on the look you're after.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Dubeau View Post
    I watched it. 2 different techniques. In the video he's removing the excess. I'm not, I'm talking about not putting any excess on in the first place. I'm just forming whats already there into a nice fillet. Think machining vs forging. Both probably acceptable depending on the look you're after.
    Yea, well if you're able to only apply just the right amount of caulk in a nice and consistent bead then you're all set.... For the rest of us, we're clumsy bastards and need to do something different.
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  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
    Yea, well if you're able to only apply just the right amount of caulk in a nice and consistent bead then you're all set.... For the rest of us, we're clumsy bastards and need to do something different.
    That's the part that take the practice ha ha, I'm not really that great at it. I tried the scrape away excess style like shown in the video, only I used a credit card corner, but no soapy water (didn't know about that trick at the time). He's doing a sink in the video with a smooth continuous edge, but I tried it on a tiled tub surround. When you hit the grout lines it looks like ****, which led me to try and find a better way.

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